From the President- Don Carter

Don Carter- NANPA President

I was reading a thread on a well-known photography website about a landowner shutting down photography on his lands. Why? The story presents two sides but no one really knows why the property is off limits except the owner but are we sometimes guilty of bad or less than courteous behavior? I have seen photographers ignore railway no trespassing signs at Bosque to photograph early morning cranes on a wonderfully located pond, and the pond was drained as the result of these trespasses. Many have seen the chaos that occurs at the Oxbow Bend Overlook during the fall with photographers failing to act in a courteous manner. I could go on and on about these types of stories, and we have all experienced such actions by others and maybe we have been less than courteous ourselves. Continue reading

Viral Images and Photographer Licensing

Story by Sean Fitzgerald, NANPA Past President

Photo by Michael Sechler

A  Manatee Image Goes Viral

An interesting article in PetaPixel raises a whole host of troublesome issues for the modern photographer. https://petapixel.com/2017/09/13/shot-hurricane-irma-photo-went-viral-wasnt-paid-dime/ Michael Sechler, a self-professed “photography enthusiast”, shot a very fine image of a manatee beached out of the water by the tidal surge from Hurricane Irma.

He posted it to Facebook, the image went viral, and then the real fun started. Fox News called. The Associated Press called. Everyone wanted to use the image in news stories, but they all wanted it for free.

Color me shocked. Continue reading

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Story and photography by Jerry Ginsberg

As I have mentioned a time or two, Grand Staircase-Escalante in central Utah is my favorite national monument. This is the case primarily for one reason; variety. This sprawling tract covers close to two million acres, almost as big as immense Yellowstone National Park.  The monument was established in 1996 with the former Escalante Wilderness as its core, primarily as a means of protecting this chunk of central Utah from the prospective strip mining of its extensive coal deposits. At the same time, whether by accident or design, it has the simultaneous effect of protecting some of the most spectacular rock formations in all of the Southwest. Lucky us!

There are several wonderful areas within the boundaries of “The Escalante” so it can be a challenge to decide where to begin. Whether or not you have researched the monument online in advance of any trip here, it’s a good idea to make an initial stop at one of the BLM / multi-agency ranger stations serving the Escalante. They are located in the towns of Kanab and Escalante, Utah. Stopping to speak with a ranger can help to put some of the photo opportunities here in some degree of logical order.

In brief and in no particular order, the prime ‘Do Not Miss’ areas here are:

Curvy red sandstone in Devil’s Garden, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, Utah. © Jerry Ginsberg

Devil’s Garden A tightly packed and surreal playground filed with outrageously eroded hoodoos and arches. My wife, at a willowy 5’9″ is accustomed to her high vantage point. Even in light of that, she is quite struck to be “feeling like Alice in Wonderland” among these remarkable geologic forms. Continue reading

From the President- Don Carter

Don Carter- NANPA President

My favorite time of the year is fall and I’m venturing to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to photograph the beautiful red and gold colors of the season. Perhaps even a wolf, a bear, or a Great Horned Owl may cross my path as I travel through the vast area of the North Woods adjacent to Lake Superior. Pictured Rock National Lakeshore and the Hiawatha National Forest are two of the photographic jewels of the Midwest.

Even though I’m excited about my trip I’m more excited about NANPA’s Jackson Wyoming Nature Celebration next May 20-22. We will have a great lineup of photographers and researchers discussing conservation, the future of photography, and topics related to the greater Yellowstone ecosystem. As a sneak preview, one of our first keynote speakers will be Rick Sammon, Canon Explorer of Light. The NANPA website is being updated and we will start taking registrations mid-October. Mark you calendars now for this great new event! Continue reading

From the Executive Director- Susan Day

Susan Day- NANPA Executive Director

I just returned from the annual American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) conference. Sounds rather dry and dull compared to attending a NANPA Summit, but these meetings are huge (this year’s attendance was 6,000) and are jam-packed with educational and inspirational sessions to help association leaders do their jobs. This was my third time attending an ASAE conference and what I’ve taken back each time is that even though NANPA is a tiny drop in a huge ocean of organizations, thanks to our forward thinking boards and contractors, we are ahead of the innovation curve in many areas. Continue reading

NANPA Weekly Wow: Aug 14-20

“Lilac-Breasted Rollers, Kruger Park, South Africa” © Sandy Richards

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2017 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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NANPA Weekly Wow: August 7-13

“Mountain reflection at sunrise, The Pacific Range, British Columbia” © David Young

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2017 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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NANPA Weekly Wow: July 31 – Aug 6

“Mired/Red-masked Parakeet, San Francisco, CA” © Ben Knoot

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2017 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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NANPA Weekly Wow: July 17-23

“Polar ice fog sunrise, Hudson Bay, Canada” ©Rick Beldegreen

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2017 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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Your Gift in Action

2017 High School Program Participant Hannah Mirando photographs a damselfly during this week’s program. Photo by Andrew Snyder.

You made it happen! The 2017 NANPA High School Scholarship Program concludes today in the Smoky Mountains thanks to your gift to the NANPA Foundation supporting the program. Ten high school students had an intensive week learning about nature, nature photography and the natural history of the Smoky Mountains at the Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont in Tremont, Tennessee. The students’ best work from the week will be shown at a reception today. Instructors Kika Tuff, Morgan Heim, Andrew Snyder and Don Carter led discussions and presentations on topics for the student participants on topics including:

  • Wildlife and ethics
  • Lightroom and editing courses
  • Shutterspeed and camera settings
  • Rules of composition
  • Ethics of manipulation
  • Camera trapping
  • Insect trapping
  • Editing a portfolio

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