President’s Letter – Don Carter – 04.03.18

Don Carter, NANPA President

No rain, no flowers. I guess it was too much to hope for to have two years of wonderful flower photography in the desert southwest. Even with the dry conditions, the desert is a photographer’s paradise, the “sky islands” offer such a unique environment. In southwest Arizona, the desert floor sits at 2400 feet, but you can hike (or drive) to over 9000 feet. The valley floor is surrounded by small clusters of mountains, or islands, which provide the adventurous photographers a cornucopia of opportunities. In the valley, you can see quail, roadrunners, javelina, deer, pronghorn, snakes, of course, and also the beautiful saguaro cactus. The peaks provide cover for bear, ringtail, coati, and some of the best birding in the world.

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From the Executive Director – Susan Day – 04.02.18

NANPA Executive Director, Susan Day

Why should you go to the Nature Photography Celebration?

As the April 9 early registration deadline nears for the Nature Photography Celebration in Jackson, Wyoming, I thought I’d write about questions we’ve been answering lately in the NANPA office.

First of all, it’s a NANPA event; and anyone who has ever attended a summit or regional event knows that they’re fun, educational, inspiring, and you get to hang out with a bunch of friendly nature photographers. Summits are primarily inside at a convention center or hotel, and regional events are outdoor field trips or workshops. Celebration combines the two—indoor presentations plus our schedule allows for free time each morning to photograph and spend time with other photographers and vendors in the field. Or have coffee or drinks together after hours in some of the cool watering holes in downtown Jackson.

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Igwazu Falls

This wall of water greets the visitor when emerging from the elevator on the lower level. © Jerry Ginsberg

Story and Photography by Jerry Ginsberg

Water is much on our minds these days. From discussions about climate change to concerns over adequate supplies of drinking water in some areas of the planet, water is a hot topic. Without question, life would not be possible without it. Whole civilizations have risen and prospered on its reliability and several have fallen without it.

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NANPA Weekly Wow – 03.26.18

Black and white image of dust bathing elephant throwing dust over head and over the family herd. © Wendy Kaveney

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2018 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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NANPA High School Scholarship Program – Deadline March 30, 2018!

Milkweed Bug on Flowers © Benjamin Urquhart

 

Encourage a High School Student to Dig Deeper Into Photography This Summer

It is always exciting to hear about the experiences of each class of the NANPA High School Scholarship Program. The 2018 program will take place in Tremont, Tennessee July 2-7 and the deadline to apply to participate is Friday, March 30.

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From the Archives: Seven Tips for Air Travel with Gear by Jeff Parker

Here is a useful post from about three years ago that is just as relevant today as it was then – how to handle your gear when traveling by air.  Enjoy!  DL

 

© Jeff Parker

© Jeff Parker

Story and Photography by Jeff Parker

 

1) Disguise your gear. 

You don’t want your bag to scream “Expensive photography equipment inside!” so make sure it looks like any other bag—or, make it look worse (perhaps you can even have a bit of fun making it look “extra” undesirable).  Cover up or remove any easily recognizable logos like “Canon” or “Nikon.”  A bit of black electrical tape works well.  Continue reading

Very Curious About Moths

Luna moth (Actius luna) photographed on my back porch in Allegany County, NY (USA) © Dave Huth

Methods for tracking down Lepidopterans to explore through photography

Story and photographs by Dave Huth

I photograph creatures and their environments as a way of exploring and understanding the beauty and complexity of the living world. I began photographing moths and caterpillars after explaining to my then-7-year-old daughter how her grandfather first got me interested in nature. My Dad is an amateur Lepidopterist who introduced me to these weird and secretive creatures when I was about her age.

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