Weekly Wow! 04.16.18

© Peter Lik

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, April 16, 2018 –

Richard Sandford – “Ferns and Birch Trees, Acadia National Park, ME”

Patrick Pevey – “African elephant dust bathing with calf, Etosha NP, Namibia”

Alice Cahill – “Devils Tower in golden grass circle, Devils Tower, Wyoming”

Peter Lik – “Island in the Sky, Olympic National Park, Washington”

Alton Marsh – “Moose cow and calf at Schwabacher Landing., Grand Teton National Park, Jackson, WY”

Marina Scarr – “Burrowing Owlets , Cape Coral, FL”

Indranil Sircar – “Leaping Gentoo Penguin, Sea Lion Island, Falkland Island”

From the Archives — In Our Yard

Editor’s Note:  While spring 2018 is struggling to make its appearance through much of the United States, we can already look in our backyards and see the early signs that it’s on the way.  Our backyards are always one of the best places to look for flowers, birds, and occasionally, something larger.  This post by Amy Shutt appeared in 2014, and what she describes sounds like the ultimate back, front, and side yards for observing wildlife.

Story and Photography by Amy Shutt

Alstroemeria psittacina 'Parrot Lily'

Alstroemeria psittacina ‘Parrot Lily’ © Amy Shutt

 

We live on 7.5 acres of land in a little town in Louisiana. Although I’ve only been here for a few years, my husband, an ornithologist, has been living here for quite some time. It’s 95% woods. He gardens the area around the house exclusively for hummingbirds and the rest is untouched. Yep, we are the eccentric neighbors with the overgrown yard with signs designating the ditch in the front as a ‘Wildflower Area’ so the city won’t cut or spray.

I see swamp rabbits almost daily. We have deer…and deer ticks. I have heard foxes in the darkness just off the driveway in the woods. We have enjoyed listening to coyotes howling in unison. Barred owls belt out their crazy calls nightly. Prothonotary Warblers nest in boxes we make for them around the house and in the woods.  Point is, it’s pretty cool out here and we share this land with a lot of critters and plants.  Continue reading

Take Action NOW to Help Make Copyright Small Claims Tribunal Happen

NANPA is working hard with other photography and visual arts associations and the Copyright Alliance to establish a copyright “small claims” tribunal. This court would provide artists and photographers with an easier and cheaper way to protect their copyright without the massive expense of a typical federal court claim. It is a game-changer, if we can get it passed.

That combined effort resulted in the introduction of HR 3945, The CASE Act (Copyright Alternative in Enforcement Act), which is making its way through Congress now. We have gathered many supporters for the CASE Act, but its passage is still not assured. The CASE Act is hitting a crucial junction in the legislative process NOW and we need your help.
NANPA’s representative in on Capital Hill today to help push the bill over this next hurdle, but we need individual constituents to press their congressional representatives as well. Fortunately, it is also easy to do.

Just go to www.copyrightdefense.com/action and you can send a letter to your Congressional representative and Senators in support of the CASE Act. You can get it done in less than 2 minutes. If you have time to give your representative a call or visit them in their office, that is even better!

It has been a grueling process to get to this point, and if we can’t push it over the line now, we may never get another chance. Your help can truly make the difference!

Copyright-Alternative-Small-Claims-Enforcement-Act-10-4-17

#smallclaims #caseact #copyrightsmallclaims #copyrightdefense

Take Action NOW to Help Make Copyright Small Claims Tribunal Happen

 

NANPA has been working with other photography and visual arts associations and the Copyright Alliance to establish a copyright “small claims” tribunal. This court would provide artists and photographers with an easier and cheaper way to protect their copyright without the massive expense of a typical federal court claim. It is a game-changer, if we can get it passed.

Continue reading

Getting the Most Out of Spring

Story and Photographs by Franklin Kearney

 

Sunrise behind Yoshino Cherry tree on Daffodil Hill, New York Botanical Garden Bronx, NY
(HDR compilation of 5 images) © Franklin Kearney

After the last snows have melted and the winds have subsided, it’s once again, a time for rebirth. Much like autumn, spring is the time of year when even people who don’t normally give much thought to nature or photography, suddenly become “nature photographers.” Sometimes, it seems as though there are almost as many photographers out in the fields as there are blooming flowers. But, who can blame them? An endless sea of brilliant red, yellow, pink and green hues can be quite intoxicating.

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President’s Letter – Don Carter – 04.03.18

Don Carter, NANPA President

No rain, no flowers. I guess it was too much to hope for to have two years of wonderful flower photography in the desert southwest. Even with the dry conditions, the desert is a photographer’s paradise, the “sky islands” offer such a unique environment. In southwest Arizona, the desert floor sits at 2400 feet, but you can hike (or drive) to over 9000 feet. The valley floor is surrounded by small clusters of mountains, or islands, which provide the adventurous photographers a cornucopia of opportunities. In the valley, you can see quail, roadrunners, javelina, deer, pronghorn, snakes, of course, and also the beautiful saguaro cactus. The peaks provide cover for bear, ringtail, coati, and some of the best birding in the world.

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From the Executive Director – Susan Day – 04.02.18

NANPA Executive Director, Susan Day

Why should you go to the Nature Photography Celebration?

As the April 9 early registration deadline nears for the Nature Photography Celebration in Jackson, Wyoming, I thought I’d write about questions we’ve been answering lately in the NANPA office.

First of all, it’s a NANPA event; and anyone who has ever attended a summit or regional event knows that they’re fun, educational, inspiring, and you get to hang out with a bunch of friendly nature photographers. Summits are primarily inside at a convention center or hotel, and regional events are outdoor field trips or workshops. Celebration combines the two—indoor presentations plus our schedule allows for free time each morning to photograph and spend time with other photographers and vendors in the field. Or have coffee or drinks together after hours in some of the cool watering holes in downtown Jackson.

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