VOLUNTEER: Susanna Euston

susannaeuston

© Leanna Preston

Susanna Euston is a fine art photographer. In addition to classical landscape images, she explores nature from a point of view that often uses techniques such as intentional camera movement (ICM) (where she moves the camera during exposure), macro or closeup, and infrared. Her goal is to evoke a sense of the energy in a scene, in a tree or flower; or perhaps its movement in the breeze; or to view its radiance up close through a veil of light. Photographing nature in unique ways, whether as an “intimate landscape” or a closeup, is her focus and delight. Susanna’s work is in galleries and exhibitions. She has been published in LensWork magazine, and she is teaching an eight-week course, “Creative Composition in Photography,” which began on September 21 and runs through November 9, at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Continue reading

NANPA Weekly Wow: Sept 26 – Oct 2

Fox Mousing Jump: Peter Pan and His Shadow, Yellowstone National Park © Cindy Goeddel

Fox Mousing Jump: Peter Pan and His Shadow, Yellowstone National Park © Cindy Goeddel

Entry deadline today– Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2016 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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FIELD TECHNIQUE: Autumn—The foolproof season

Story and photography by F.M. Kearney

If there was such a thing as a Super Bowl season for nature photography, it would have to be autumn. Perhaps the best thing about this time of year is that there are no bad days for a shoot. Fall foliage is one of the few subjects in nature that look good in virtually any type of lighting or weather condition.

Fall foliage at Hessian Lake Bear Mountain State Park Bear Mountain, NY

Overcast condition. © F.M. Kearney

Fall foliage around Richmond Lake Clove Lakes Park Staten Island, NY (5-image HDR compilation)

Sunny condition. © F.M. Kearney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colorful foliage and bodies of water are a great combination. Look for reflections along the shorelines of lakes and rivers. I used to think that sunny days provided the best reflections, but as you can see from the images above, stunning results can be obtained in cloudy conditions as well. Although purely a personal choice, I prefer shooting fall foliage on overcast days. However, there is one important thing to keep in mind: a gloomy white sky won’t add much to your photos. In fact, it can be distracting. In the overcast shot, I zoomed in tight to crop it out—placing the emphasis on the multicolored tree line. Continue reading

What is the NANPA Foundation?

Story by Mary Jane Gibson, NANPA Foundation Vice President

February 21, 2015. San Diego, CA. NANPA's 19th Nature Photography Summit. The College Scholarship students, sponsored by the NANPA Foundation, gather on stage after presenting their multimedia production of the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge. The video was photographed and produced during the summit and donated to the refuge for educational purposes. © Mark A. Larson

February 21, 2015. San Diego, CA. NANPA’s 19th Nature Photography Summit. The College Scholarship students, sponsored by the NANPA Foundation, gather on stage after presenting their multimedia production of the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge. The video was photographed and produced during the summit and donated to the refuge for educational purposes. © Mark A. Larson

Whether new to NANPA or an original charter member, you probably have little understanding of the NANPA Foundation – what it does, why it exists, and why it is asking for money. Continue reading

PHOTOGRAPHER PROJECT: Colorado River

Story and photography by Carl Galie

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The confluence of the Colorado and the Little Colorado rivers. © Carl Galie

In April 2015, as I was getting organized for a ten-day raft trip through the Grand Canyon that was planned for September, American Rivers announced its 2015 America’s Most Endangered Rivers List. (See this year’s list, 2016, at: https://www.americanrivers.org/threats-solutions/endangered-rivers.) First on the 2015 list was 277 miles of the lower Colorado River that runs through the Grand Canyon. Three proposals that could impact the river were noted. Continue reading

NANPA Weekly Wow: Sept 19-26

Pholcid spider holding eggs in her jaws © William Tyler

Pholcid spider holding eggs in her jaws © William Tyler

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2016 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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NATURE’S VIEW: Moments (Part I)

When to anticipate them and when to chase them

Story and photography by Jim Clark

sandstone-falls-hdr-photo-08042015-hinton-wv-c-jim-clark_01

At Sandstone Falls, West Virginia, I waited for a bank of low-lying clouds to enter the scene before I photographed it. © Jim Clark

During my childhood living in the remote mountains of southern West Virginia, nature became my addiction. The only way to satisfy my craving was to spend more time outside. I learned about the importance of waiting, listening and observing. After all, I was, at age ten, a hardcore birder, and by simply doing these three things I was able to add more birds to my life list. The more time I spent in the mountains, the more adept I became at reading the landscape, the seasons and the critters.

When I couldn’t be in nature, I read every book I could find about nature and the men and women who made it their careers. I learned that these individuals—Roger Tory Peterson, Rachel Carson and John Burroughs, to name a few—possessed the same skills I was developing: waiting, listening and observing.

Today, through my life-long passion and career in wildlife conservation combined with 40 years of nature photography, I have developed a mantra that always holds true to form: Know when to anticipate and know when to chase a moment. It has worked well for me both as a wildlife ecologist and as a nature photographer.

Knowing when to wait—anticipate—for just the right time to photograph means having the ability to be patient and the intellectual curiosity to determine ahead of time how a moment might play out. I discovered in my early years that the more patient and observant I am, the more knowledge I gain that can be used to decipher, locate or identify an event in future situations. And, by knowing the species, its behavior and habitats, and by understanding the lay of a landscape, I gain an ability to anticipate a moment. Continue reading

From Jersey to Italy

Story and photography by David DesRochers

Budoia, Italy © David DesRochers

Budoia, Italy © David DesRochers

It was September of 2006 when I walked into a Tri-County Camera Club meeting in Nutley, New Jersey to judge my first photo competition. As a member of my own camera club, I had spent the previous six years listening attentively to other judges score and critique our own competition entries, some even offering suggestions on how to improve them. Not all judges are created equal and I didn’t always agree with what they had to say but I developed a thick skin and used many of their suggestions to help improve my own work.   And now it was my turn in the hot seat. Continue reading

NANPA Weekly Wow: Sept 12-19

© Marie Read

© Marie Read

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2016 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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From the NANPA President

cbolt_portrait_jan2014I’ll let you in a little secret: I’m kind of an introvert. A life spent chasing bugs and toads doesn’t exactly translate to an explosive social life. So for the first few years of my career in nature photography, I avoided big photographic functions, preferring to put my head down and focus on the work that had a conservation impact in my home state of South Carolina.

It wasn’t until 2011 that I decided to take the plunge and attend my first NANPA Summit. I was a little over a year into Meet Your Neighbours, an international photo project that I co-founded in 2009, and I needed to recruit more photographers to join the effort. That year, the Summit was being held in McAllen, Texas, and as I rode the bus to the hotel—sweaty and disheveled from a day of flying—I wondered what I had gotten myself into. How could I know that moments later, a series of events would transpire that would alter the course of my life? Continue reading