NANPA News

A Sense of Peace

The remarkably peaceful and tranquil images of noted Central New York landscape photographer Tom Dwyer are being showcased for the month of April at Ironstone Gallery in Manlius, New York.

Tom, whose images have been recognized in NANPA’s annual showcase, is well known for his inviting landscapes of Central New York, the finger lakes and the Adirondacks. His work has been published in NANPA’s annual, Expressions, and its quarterly magazine, Currents. It has also appeared in regional publications Adirondack Life, Adirondac and Plank Road magazines.  Photographers from across the country have visited Upstate New York to participate in Tom’s nature photography workshops.

Tom will be on hand to discuss his approach to landscape photography at an opening reception for “A Sense of Peace,” Thursday, March 27, from 3 to 8 p.m., at the Ironstone Gallery, 201 E. Seneca Street, Manlius, New York (315-682-2040). Light refreshments will be served.

Nature in New Orleans by Lana Gramlich

Curving oaks in fog

Nature in New Orleans: Fontainebleau State Park

Text and Photographs by Lana Gramlich

New Orleans usually conjures thoughts of Mardi Gras, the French Quarter and jazz. As a local nature photographer, I think more about moss-draped live oaks, alligator-friendly bayous and the uncontrollable explosion of nature that only hot, humid climes can provide. Situated on the shores of Lake Pontchartrain in Mandeville, Louisiana, one of my favorite places to shoot is Fontainebleau State Park.

About a 50 minute drive from downtown New Orleans,Fontainebleau State Park sprawls over 2,800 acres. The park is open daily and you’d be hard pressed to find a better bargain than the $2 day use fee (camping is available at different rates). Bernard de Marigny de Mandeville developed the area as a sugar plantation until 1852, making Fontainebleau a historical site, but it’s also an interesting convergence of various ecosystems that offer a wide range of natural subject matter.  Read the rest of this entry »

NATURE’S VIEW: The Lowdown on the Slowdown by Jim Clark

With neutral density filter (c) Jim Clark

With neutral density filter (c) Jim Clark

Variable Neutral Density Filters Expand Horizons for Landscape Photography

Story and photographs by Jim Clark

For years I was a devoted citizen of the basic rules of landscape photography. Images were sharp and focused throughout, and I photographed only during early morning, late afternoon or during days with overcast skies. I wouldn’t have dared to photograph during the mid-day hours when there were clear skies. I did not step outside this zone of comfort fearing somewhere in some international doctrine of nature photography I would be prosecuted to the fullest extent. Yet, I wanted to add a bit more spark to my images. Read the rest of this entry »

PHOTOGRAPHER PROJECT: For Every Fallen Wolf by Weldon Lee

(Canis lupus) captive animal; Kalispell, Montana (c) Weldon Lee

(Canis lupus) captive animal; Kalispell, Montana (c) Weldon Lee

Story and photograph by Weldon Lee

Prejudice is not limited to religion and racial ethnicity. It also finds targets among our wild brothers and sisters, not the least being the gray wolf. Wolf eradication can be traced back to the Middle Ages in Europe. It’s not surprising that it lifted its ugly head again as Europeans began arriving in the New World.

According to PBS, “By the middle of the twentieth century, government-sponsored extermination had wiped out nearly all gray wolves in the Lower 48 states. Only a small population remained in northeastern Minnesota and Michigan.” This came about as a result of wealthy livestock owners wielding their influence over policymakers in Washington, D.C., and demanding a wider grazing range.

In spite of Congress providing protection for wolves under the Endangered Species Act in 1973, wolves are still being killed.

The endangered species protection for gray wolves was repealed in six states. What followed over the last two years was the killing of more than 2,600 wolves. Now the government wants to delist gray wolves in practically the entire Lower 48. Read the rest of this entry »

Snowy Owls by Bernie Friel

DSLR
Snowy Owls: In Minnesota in Record Numbers

Text and Photographs by Bernie Friel

Not only is Minnesota experiencing record cold this winter, (an average January daytime temperature of 8º F) but to warm the hearts, if not the bodies of nature photographers (and bird watchers alike), there has been a record migration of snowy owls into the state. While in most years a few may be seen in far northern Minnesota, this year they have been found at more than 250 locations throughout the state. They have also been found into Iowa and as far south as Kansas. The presence in such great numbers of this bird of the Arctic tundra is thought to be a consequence of the crash in the lemming population (sometimes called the tundra potato chip) in their home hunting grounds, causing them to seek food further south.  Read the rest of this entry »

VOLUNTEERS OF NANPA: Mary Jane Gibson

MJ KananaskisMary Jane Gibson is an advanced nature photographer as well as a naturalist, writer and educator. She specializes in birds. When Mary Jane took up serious nature photography in the late eighties, she installed a backyard stream and a blind and started shooting. Since then, she has designed several other backyard wildlife habitats.  Although Mary Jane currently lives in an apartment in Mill Creek, Washington, she plans to have her next home in the Puget Sound area surrounded by wildlife. She currently is traveling for nature and travel photography as much as possible, both locally and abroad. She has been active in the NANPA Foundation and several NANPA committees.

What is your “day” job?

I no longer have a day job, having retired in 2001 to travel, photograph and participate more fully in volunteer work. I began doing nature photography seriously in 1987, especially birds and wildlife, and although I do not market my work, it is my passion to improve constantly and produce professional quality results. I have grown over the years and learned so much from being in NANPA with its outstanding members, workshops and presentations. Read the rest of this entry »

Photo Contests: A Great Opportunity for Up-and-Coming Nature Photographers

 

North American Porcupine; Kluane National Park, Yukon Territory

North American Porcupine; Kluane National Park, Yukon Territory, Canada

Story and Photographs by Jenaya Launstein 

If you’ve been wondering about photography contests and whether they’re worth your time and effort, the answer is yes! I have really enjoyed and benefited from the competitions I’ve entered over the past few years, and would like to share some of the benefits, along with the considerations you should be aware of.

Entering photography competitions is a great way to develop your skills, and should you be successful, build a name for yourself along the way. There are many popular international competitions out there; Windland Smith Rice International Awards by Nature’s Best Photography, BBC/NHM Wildlife Photographer of the Year, NWF’s National Wildlife Photo Contest and Audubon Magazine Photography Awards, just to name a few.

Many competitions publish the winners’ and finalists’ images in magazines, offering even further exposure. The people who see these images could be potential print customers or even editors looking for talented photographers. Beyond getting your name out there, many photographers enter competitions for the great prizes! Some competitions offer cash awards or gift cards for photo gear, even photography adventures. I have a great collection of camera bags and other accessories now, thanks to these competitions!

There’s no question that winning a big competition will get your name out to many new people and possibilities, however don’t pass up the national and regional competitions. Although smaller, they are a great place to start! You are still getting your name out there, and in many cases you will receive beneficial feedback on your images.

By placing in the youth category of the annual Canadian Geographic Wildlife Photography of the Year competitions, I’ve had several of my images displayed in Canada’s Museum of Nature the past three years. They were also included in a traveling exhibition throughout the country that has resulted in print sales and additional exposure for my photography.

Rocky Mountain Elk; Banff, Alberta, Canada

Rocky Mountain Elk; Banff, Alberta, Canada

In 2011, I won the youth category in the popular NWF National Wildlife Photo Contest. To say I was excited is an understatement! Three years after the contest, I was contacted last month by someone, who had looked through the winner’s gallery, interested in purchasing several of my prints! In 2013, I was named the Youth Photographer of the Year in the Windland Smith Rice International Awards by Nature’s Best Photography. The exposure that is generating for me is nothing short of incredible.

Don’t just stick with your favorite subjects! I’m almost exclusively a wildlife photographer, but in 2012, I entered and won the Grand Prize in the Western Heritage Values photo contest with a picture I took of my dad and brother. The prize included airfare for two to the destination of my choice! I knew immediately where I would go, and a few months later I was photographing bears, moose and more in Alaska and the Yukon Territories. It was an amazing experience and the images I captured there are among my all-time favorites. One of the images I captured was the image chosen as the winner in the Windland Smith Rice Awards.

One of the most important things you must do before entering any competition, however, is to read the terms and conditions thoroughly, and understand what image rights you are giving to the organizers. Even though the contest may have great prizes, the rights they demand may not make it a wise decision for you to enter. The conditions attached to any competition, is the number one factor in my decision of whether I submit any images.

You should also pay close attention to the rules and guidelines of the competition. What type of images are allowed? What are the limitations on processing, cropping, etc? Be sure to follow their instructions for file size, naming, EXIF info and color settings.

If you agree with the terms and understand the rules, I encourage you to enter! You never know what doors it could open up for you. Placing and winning in photo competitions has really helped my career to lift off, even at age 16!

Bohemian Waxwing eating berries; Pincher Creek, Alberta, Canada

Bohemian Waxwing eating berries; Pincher Creek, Alberta, Canada

Now, some of you may still be reluctant. You might think that you’re not good enough yet, or don’t have the best camera or lenses. Don’t let that keep you from choosing a good competition to start with and submitting your best! And if you really don’t think you’re ready yet, keep practicing! Go to a nearby park or natural area and find something to photograph so you can develop your eye. It’s also a great idea to ask other photographers for feedback on your images. Their advice can really help you improve your work. So get out there and create some award-winning images of your own!

 

16 year old Jenaya Launstein, was one of ten selected for NANPA’s 2013 High School Scholarship Program. You can follow her on Twitter.

Snows of the Nile

Snows of the Nile1_Photo by Neil Losin

Nate Dappen at the mouth of an ice cave in the Margherita Glacier on Mount Stanley, Rwenzori Mountains National Park, Uganda.

Responses and Images by Nate Dappen and Neil Losin | Day’s Edge Productions

 

 

How did the idea for this film get started?

Neil came up with the original idea to retrace the steps of older expeditions and recapture their photos to document the disappearance of glaciers on equatorial mountains. At first, we had our sights set on documenting the glaciers on Puncak Jaya (also known as Carstensz Pyramid) in Indonesia. But, as we did more research, it became clear that it would be logistic and financial nightmare to climb Puncak Jaya. So, we started looking elsewhere. I grew up in Nairobi, and my dad had climbed the Rwenzori’s in the late 80’s. So, when Neil and I found out that the first-ever expedition to climb the peaks had photographed their journey extensively, we knew that we were going to Uganda. Read the rest of this entry »

Member Moment: Royal Terns

Gulp-3-0195

 

Member Moment and Photographs by Linda Caden

I made this series of images of royal terns at Huguenot Park, a state park with a wide beach and grassy dunes on the coast of North Florida. The adult terns make nests in the dunes, lay their eggs, and by July most of the chicks have hatched. When we visited there were thousands of royal terns, gulls and other sea birds on the beach. It was a cacophony of sounds!  Read the rest of this entry »

Metamorphosis by Robin Moore

 

Metamorphosis-8307

Story and Photographs by Robin Moore

Metamorphosis spawned out of a conversation I had one day in early 2012 with conservationist Gabby Wild. We were discussing the difficulties of raising concern for the plight of the most threatened group of all vertebrates, the amphibians, and committed to concocting a publicity campaign. We wanted to do something different, something that would make people look twice, or see amphibians in a new light. A few months later, we were in a studio in Los Angeles decorating a body-painted Gabby with live frogs and newts.

In my time as an amphibian biologist and a photographer I have shot (with a camera) a lot of frogs, but this shoot was different. Rather than wading mosquito-riddled swamps or hacking through thick jungle to find and photograph elusive frogs in their natural habitat, I was bringing them into the controlled environment of a studio and shooting them against the canvas of the human body. In doing so, I had to learn a whole new way of shooting. Instead of finding or waiting for the right light, I had to craft my own, and instead of patiently waiting for the action to unfold in front of me, I had to conceptualize and create compositions around a theme. It was both testing and creatively invigorating.  Read the rest of this entry »

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