Posts tagged ‘birds’

Nature’s View – Top Secrets of Bird Photography, Story and photographs by Jim Clark

What the Pros Don’t Want you to Know

With the professional bird photographers hot on my trail, I’m going to reveal, right now, the top secrets of bird photography. I’m ready to sacrifice myself for the betterment of every one of you who want to photograph birds. All are welcome, but if anyone asks, I had nothing to do with this.

Sincerely,

Jim Clark, uh, I mean Ansel Wolfe Lepp.
P.S. You never heard this from me.

Read the rest of this entry »

Bird Photography at Mono Lake by Marie Read

Wilson's Phalaropes (Phalaropus tricolor) flock at South Tufa, Mono Lake, California, USA

Wilson’s Phalaropes (Phalaropus tricolor) flock at South Tufa, Mono Lake, California, USA

Story and Photographs by Marie Read

Mono Lake is one of California’s most photogenic locations, a well-known destination for landscape photographers worldwide. Bizarre rocky spires called tufa towers punctuate the waters and shoreline of this desert sea, while the snow-capped Sierra Nevada forms a spectacular backdrop to the west. The well-kept secret is that Mono Lake and its surroundings are great for bird photography as well.

Mono Lake’s alkaline, highly saline water supports no fish, but it teems with brine shrimp and alkali flies, providing food for numerous breeding birds, including California Gulls, American Avocets, and Snowy Plovers. Osprey nest atop the tufa, commuting to and from freshwater lakes nearby for fish for their young. Around the lake sagebrush scrub, pinyon-juniper, and conifer-aspen woodlands support many other birds. I’d like to share some of my favorite bird photography spots. Read the rest of this entry »

NATURE’S VIEW: Lessons from the Lake – story and photos © Jim Clark

Part I: Going Beyond F/stops &  Shutter Speeds

“There is no place like springtime in the marsh. I like to just sit back and let it tell me all its stories.”—Karen Hollingsworth

Karen is a fellow NANPA member and nature photographer, and I’ve often repeated her words to my workshop students to emphasize the value of savoring the experience. I have learned that an outstanding image takes more than technical skills. The more you are into the moment, the more your images stand out.

Northern Parula Warbler  (c) Jim Clark

Northern Parula Warbler © Jim Clark

A few weeks ago, I drove to my childhood home in the remote coalfield region of southern West Virginia. Much has changed since I grew up there, but one constant remains: a small mountain lake that has served as my secret location to explore and photograph nature. There is nothing fancy about this lake, but it has provided me with countless hours of enjoyment. Read the rest of this entry »

An Editor’s Perspective: Photography by Benjamin Olson

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Images by Benjamin Olson

Story and Gallery Edit by Miriam Stein

 

This winter proved an exciting time for birdwatchers and wildlife enthusiasts as the cold months in 2013-2014 brought a snowy owl irruption to the United States.  The beautiful birds were seen as far south as Florida and Bermuda.  Benjamin Olson spent a few months following a snowy owl that took up residence near his home in Minnesota.  I greatly appreciate the time and dedication Benjamin showed in tracking this owl and making beautiful photographs without the use of bait, an all-too common practice among owl photographers.  I love the natural blue and white backgrounds of Benjamin’s photographs and the artistic composition he employed in making his images. To see more of Benjamin’s work, visit www.benjamin-olson.com. Read the rest of this entry »

Snowy Owls by Bernie Friel

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Snowy Owls: In Minnesota in Record Numbers

Text and Photographs by Bernie Friel

Not only is Minnesota experiencing record cold this winter, (an average January daytime temperature of 8º F) but to warm the hearts, if not the bodies of nature photographers (and bird watchers alike), there has been a record migration of snowy owls into the state. While in most years a few may be seen in far northern Minnesota, this year they have been found at more than 250 locations throughout the state. They have also been found into Iowa and as far south as Kansas. The presence in such great numbers of this bird of the Arctic tundra is thought to be a consequence of the crash in the lemming population (sometimes called the tundra potato chip) in their home hunting grounds, causing them to seek food further south.  Read the rest of this entry »

Member Moment: Royal Terns

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Member Moment and Photographs by Linda Caden

I made this series of images of royal terns at Huguenot Park, a state park with a wide beach and grassy dunes on the coast of North Florida. The adult terns make nests in the dunes, lay their eggs, and by July most of the chicks have hatched. When we visited there were thousands of royal terns, gulls and other sea birds on the beach. It was a cacophony of sounds!  Read the rest of this entry »

NATURE’S VIEW: Getting to Ground Level

by Jim Clark

Oystercatcher_20120429_001(c) Jim ClarkOf all the genres of nature photography, my most challenging one is wildlife photography.

Challenge one: the primary subject is mobile and doesn’t tend to stay in place very long unless sleeping, resting or nesting.  Challenge two: the primary subject is more wary than a landscape, flower or inanimate abstract subject. Challenge three: The primary subject has eyes. It may very well be watching your every move.

The first inclination of many aspiring nature photographers is to remain standing to photograph a critter that is much smaller than they are. While I, too, will stand to photograph a smaller animal the first time I encounter it, I then make an effort to change my perspective and get lower. Read the rest of this entry »

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