Posts tagged ‘NANPA foundation’

VOLUNTEERS OF NANPA: Cindy Miller Hopkins

Cindy Miller Hopkins is a full-time travel and wildlife photographer. Her images can be seen on the pages of hundreds of textbooks, travel brochures, calendars and other consumer products, as well as U.S. and international magazines. Her freelance, workshop and assignment career has taken her to seven continents and more than 140 countries. Cindy is a long-time member of the American Society of Picture Professionals and, currently, co-president of the NANPA Foundation Board. When she’s not traveling (which isn’t often) she lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

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© Cindy Miller Hopkins

What is your “day” job?
I’m a full- time stock and assignment photographer specializing in travel, nature and cultural imagery. An average year for me includes over 175 days of travel with about 60 percent assignment work and 40 percent freelance. I also teach photo workshops on small expedition-style cruise ships, and I’ve led a few photo tours for the NANPA Foundation. Read the rest of this entry »

VOLUNTEERS OF NANPA: Mary Jane Gibson

MJ KananaskisMary Jane Gibson is an advanced nature photographer as well as a naturalist, writer and educator. She specializes in birds. When Mary Jane took up serious nature photography in the late eighties, she installed a backyard stream and a blind and started shooting. Since then, she has designed several other backyard wildlife habitats.  Although Mary Jane currently lives in an apartment in Mill Creek, Washington, she plans to have her next home in the Puget Sound area surrounded by wildlife. She currently is traveling for nature and travel photography as much as possible, both locally and abroad. She has been active in the NANPA Foundation and several NANPA committees.

What is your “day” job?

I no longer have a day job, having retired in 2001 to travel, photograph and participate more fully in volunteer work. I began doing nature photography seriously in 1987, especially birds and wildlife, and although I do not market my work, it is my passion to improve constantly and produce professional quality results. I have grown over the years and learned so much from being in NANPA with its outstanding members, workshops and presentations. Read the rest of this entry »

PHILIP HYDE GRANT: San Pedro Mezquital Project by Jaime Rojo

 

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Applications for the 2014 Philip Hyde Grant are due on November 30th, 2013. This $2,500 grant, provided by Fine Print Imaging through its Art for Conservation program, the NANPA Environment Committee and individual donations, is awarded annually by the NANPA Foundation to an individual NANPA member who is actively pursuing completion of a peer-reviewed environmental project that is consistent with the missions of NANPA and the NANPA Foundation. Click here to apply

 

Project Update from Jaime Rojo: 2012 Recipient of the Philip Hyde Grant

The San Pedro Mezquital project is an ongoing communications effort to protect the last free-flowing river in the Western Sierra Madre, Mexico. The river is under threat by several development projects, including a dam in the middle basin and a huge tourist resource in the upper basin.

The Philip Hyde Grant that I obtained in May 2012 was used to continue the documentation of this huge river basin, but also to give public presentations in the upper and lower basin to involve the local communities in the actions to protect the river.

In May 2012, we inaugurated a large format exhibit of the San Pedro Mezquital that was hosted by the three main cities of the basin, following the course of the river on its way to the sea. I gave presentations on Durango and Tepic on the day of the exhibit launch, and had meetings with regional authorities involved in the management of the river basin:

- Durango, upper basin, May 2012

- Presidio, middle basin, Oct 2012

- Tepic, lower basin, Jan 2013

Also, in January 2013, I did a 2-week expedition with my colleague Octavio Aburto, co-financed by National Geographic Explorers Fund, to document some of the most remote parts of the upper basin (Chachacuaxtle canyon and the Tres Molinos basin), with some surprising results, and a field blog was published in National Geographic Newswatch.  The Philip Hyde Grant represented a great opportunity to continue the conservation photography work in the San Pedro Mezquital river and I will always be thankful for NANPA’s support.

Please take a moment to check out the San Pedro Mezquital website, and this multimedia piece that I produced for NANPA Foundation called San Pedro Mezquital.

 

Children at a project exhibit in Durango, Mexico

Children at a project exhibit in Durango, Mexico

NANPA PHOTOGRAPHER PROJECT: Sacred Headwaters


by Paul Colangelo

Unnamed tributary of Chismore Creek, British Columbia, 2010The Sacred Headwaters in northern British Columbia is the shared birthplace of three great salmon rivers—the Stikine, Skeena and Nass. It is also the traditional territory of the Tahltan First Nation, and it supports a vast ecosystem known for large numbers of moose, caribou, sheep, goats, wolves and bears.

In 2004, Shell obtained tenure of nearly a million acres in the heart of the Sacred Headwaters for a coal bed methane development that would entail thousands of wells connected by roads and pipelines, fracturing wildlife habitat. The water-intensive fracking process that would be used to remove the methane risked altering water levels and contaminating the rivers. Read the rest of this entry »

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