Posts tagged ‘NANPA foundation’

How the NANPA Program Impacted Me by Jorel Cuomo ©


Tiger in Madhya Pradesh, India. © Jorel Cuomo

How the NANPA Program Impacted Me

by Jorel Cuomo, 2004 NHSPP Participant

When I attended NANPA’s High School Scholarship Program (NHSSP) in 2004 in Portland, my eyes opened to exploring wildlife photography as a medium. I greatly benefited from the one-on-one instruction and support of fellow photographers, both peers and mentors. Before attending this program, I never knew all this support existed; I felt that I was exploring nature and my camera by myself. Being a scholarship winner gave me the opportunity to harness my potential. Being surrounding by world-class photographers that shared their knowledge and experience opened my eyes to the possibilities that awaited me in our magnificent world.


Leopard, Southern India. © Jorel Cuomo

The intensive workshop improved my photographic skills, knowledge and daily workflow. The hands-on experience increased my love of photography and helped me understand what it takes to be a nature photographer. NANPA helped me realize there are other nature photographers out there that share a similar passion, and has since been fantastic in helping me network and motivate me to continue my lifelong passion.


I have become quite fascinated with Asia over the past year. Some of my most memorable moments have been photographing rhinos in Nepal, tigers in India, leopards in Sri Lanka, and orangutans in Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo). I find the excitement of traveling and photographing wildlife to be the most rewarding thing I can do with my life.


© Jorel Cuomo


Traveling the world has given me insight into the natural world and its diminishing habitats. I am greatly affected by where our planet is headed and would like to focus my attention on protecting natural areas through photography. I hope that by creating images that evoke emotions about the beauty and importance of nature, I can help others feel this connection and take action to conserve critical habitats and wildlife for future generations.

To give this same type of experience to other high school students, please make a donation to NANPA Foundation’s High School Scholarship Fund by December 4th. Visit our campaign page to make an online donation. If you prefer to make a gift by check, make it payable to NANPA Foundation with “High School Program” in the memo line and mail it to NANPA Foundation, 6382 Charleston Rd., Alma, IL 62807.


Online fundraising for High School Student Scholarship Program

Grant Supports Environmental Projects with Impact

Grant Supports Environmental Projects with Impact

Philip Hyde Environmental Grant applications accepted through October 30, 2015

© David Herasimtschuk, 2014 grant recipient.

© David Herasimtschuk, 2014 grant recipient.

What difference do your photographs make?

Applications are now available for NANPA’s Philip Hyde Environmental grant, a $2,500 award given annually to an individual NANPA member actively pursuing completion of a peer-reviewed environmental project featuring natural photography as a medium of communication, nature appreciation and environmental protection. Application deadline is October 30, 2015 at midnight PDT.

Past recipients include Paul Colangelo (2010), whose efforts to bring the remote and largely unseen Sacred Headwaters of British Columbia to the attention of lawmakers and citizens outside of the Tahltan First Nation played a key role in vacating Shell Oil Company from a million acres slated for methane development; Amy Gulick (2008), whose award-winning book Salmon in the Trees, traveling exhibits, lectures and YouTube videos tell a hopeful story of Alaska’s Tongass rain forest, a rare ecosystem where salmon grow trees and support an abundance of bears and bald eagles; and C.C. Lockwood (2008), whose photographs showcase disappearing swamplands that threatened the culture and economy of Louisiana, as featured in the PBS documentary Atchafalaya Houseboat.

As applicants for the Philip Hyde Environmental Grant, these photographers successfully demonstrated the ways in which their still photographs would make a difference to specific decision-makers wrestling with a timely issue. Additionally, at the time of application, these projects were already well underway, with established collaborations, realistic schedules and practical budgets. These factors made for compelling applications that fared well in scoring.

For complete guidelines, link to the online application and additional tips for applicants, please visit

The inaugural Philip Hyde Environmental Grant was awarded in 1999. It was established in honor of Philip Hyde, recipient of NANPA’s 1996 Lifetime Achievement Award.

Although he studied under Ansel Adams, Minor White and Edward Weston, Hyde describes his work as evolving past the hard and fast definitions of his early training. “I am not interested in pretty pictures for postcards. I feel better if I just get a few people to see something they haven’t seen before,” writes Hyde.

The Philip Hyde Environmental Grant honors this spirit, supporting photographers who clearly document in application materials the ways in which their projects reach influential people—not necessarily the mass public—and challenge them to discover something new about an imminent environmental issue.

Hyde, whose photograph “Cathedral in the Desert, Glen Canyon, Utah, 1964” was named one of the top 100 photographs of the 20th Century by American Photo magazine, played a key role in protecting Dinosaur National Monument, the Grand Canyon, the Coast Redwoods, Point Reyes, King’s Canyon, Canyon de Chelly, the North Cascades, Canyonlands, the Wind Rivers, Big Sur and many other National Parks and wilderness areas.

© David Herasimtschuk, 2014 grant recipient.

© David Herasimtschuk, 2014 grant recipient.

© David Herasimtschuk, 2014 grant recipient.

© David Herasimtschuk, 2014 grant recipient.

NANPA Foundation Photo Tour: Photograph “the quiet side” of Ireland in 2016 with Ron Rosenstock

Magical light, accessible shoreline and community await prospective tour leaders.

Ireland Sunset © Ron Rosenstock

Ireland Sunset © Ron Rosenstock

You’re invited on a 10-day tour of Western Ireland with veteran tour leader Ron Rosenstock, September 23 through October 3, 2016. The magical light, sacred sights and after-dinner conversation with fellow artists not only beckon you to expand your portfolio but also your career—perhaps becoming a photo tour leader yourself.

Rosenstock, retired photography instructor from Clark University in Massachusetts, has led more than 200 tours to worldwide destinations since 1967. He was first drawn to Western Ireland because of the light and extensive miles of accessible shoreline. “Being in the northern hemisphere, there are magical cloud formations daily, if not hourly,” he explains. “The light is silvery sifting through layers of cloud and sky.”

The tour is set in County Mayo, often described as “the quiet side of Ireland” and includes tiny villages, hidden beaches, castles and ancient abbeys that you could never locate on your own. It is a landscape of broad peat lowlands and dramatic coastline where soft pastel shades and the warmth of the Irish people have captivated artists for hundreds of years.

But Rosenstock’s tour includes more than just visual points of interest. He also opens his home, providing accommodations at Hillcrest House, renovated specifically to house groups such as this. Most evenings after a traditional Irish dinner, the group moves to the living room to talk about photography and how to become a photo tour leader—because Rosenstock wants others to benefit from his trials and triumphs.

Castle Bourke © Ron Rosenstock

Castle Bourke © Ron Rosenstock

“I’m the luckiest person in the world,” he explains. “In my 70s, I look back and realize I’ve been living my dream. My wish now is to pass on what I have learned, the struggles and benefits of being an international photo tour leader.”

Although Rosenstock can list many traits required of a good photo tour leader, he places the ability to listen and respond honestly and clearly at the top. He says you have to be open to the needs and concerns of all group members and flexible enough to meet them.

Participating photographers from previous tours have noted a sense of communion about the trip. Communion with other photographers, with sacred sights and with nature.

“[Ron’s] talk on photography and the spirituality of photography was a great revelation for me, as I have always felt this way about it myself,” said Michael McLaughlin. “It was great beyond words to be participating with a group of artists who were as passionate as I about photography and image making.”

Past participants have also enjoyed going to town to enjoy traditional Irish music at pubs in Westport.

The tour is limited to eight photographers. NANPA members can attend at a special rate, and a donation will be made to the NANPA Foundation. For more information, visit the NANPA Foundation’s site at or

Don’t delay your registration—the tour has sold out four years in a row.

Thor Ballylee © Ron rosenstock

Thor Ballylee © Ron rosenstock

Ballintubber Abbey, Ireland @ Ron Rosenstock

Ballintubber Abbey, Ireland @ Ron Rosenstock

Help the NANPA Foundation Help You – Without an Extra Penny from Your Pocket

Help the NANPA Foundation Help You – Without an Extra Penny from Your Pocket

Screen Shot 2015-08-31 at 11.21.58 AMDon’t know what the NANPA Foundation is – LEARN MORE ON THEIR NEW WEBSITE!

Do you buy from Amazon? If you do – regardless of how often – your purchases can help the NANPA Foundation if you take just 4 easy steps.

First, you may be asking “What is the NANPA Foundation?” The NANPA Foundation is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to:

  • Develop, support and implement nature photography projects jointly with NANPA and other organizations
  • Initiate, partner, operate and raise/promote funding for respective projects
  • Advance the awareness of and appreciation for nature through photography

The Foundation provides the funding for several of NANPA’s programs including the high school program, the college student program and the Philip Hyde Grant. We also have our own programs that we manage and fund including the Janie Moore Greene grant for college scholarship and building photo blinds at refuges, wildlife reserves, state/city parks, or other natural areas.

Contributions to the Foundation are tax deductible – so we are a fundraising arm of NANPA, but a completely separate organization.


Back to Amazon & How You Can Help

Now, how can you help the NANPA Foundation while you’re shopping at Amazon?

Amazon is willing to give the NANPA Foundation a percentage of eligible sales made through the AmazonSmile site.

The products are the same as what is on the Amazon site.

The pricing is the same as what is on the Amazon site.

Your same account, cart and other information from the Amazon site is also on the AmazonSmile page – it converts for you!

The AmazonSmile program is just an easier way for Amazon to give back to eligible nonprofits – like NANPA Foundation.


How to Participate

  1. Go to and login as you would your Amazon account (or create a new account if you do not currently have an Amazon account)
  2. Under “Your Account,” select “Change Your Charity” and search for NANPA.
  3. Click the Select button next to the “NANPA Infinity Foundation” name.
  4. Start shopping!


That’s it! NANPA Foundation will be remembered as your charity of choice and a percentage of any eligible purchases you make will be credited to NANPA Foundation anytime you shop on Amazon and go to the AmazonSmile site first – bookmark it!

The NANPA Foundation does not see who makes purchases that support the Foundation and we don’t see what is purchased. We simply get a quarterly payment which is the sum of contributions from eligible purchases made by those who have designated NANPA Foundation as their charity to support.

Thanks for your support of the NANPA Foundation! Learn more at



NANPA College Scholarship Program

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

NANPA College Scholarship Program

Text By Don Carter and Photos by Mark Larson

You may not know that NANPA has a college scholarship program where we pay expenses for 12 college students to come to the Summit where they network, learn, have their portfolios reviewed, and create a conservation project for a client. The NANPA college committee finds a client who would like the students’ help in creating a multimedia presentation about some type of conservation effort. This year, the students will be working with the San Diego Fish and Wildlife Services, documenting their restoration work along the San Diego Bay. The students will take images, shoot video and conduct interviews in the process of creating the multimedia presentation that will be used by FWS to introduce their conservation efforts to the local community. The presentation will also be shown prior to the keynote address on Saturday evening of the summit.

The students arrive on Monday, prior to the summit to start their planning and create their shooting schedule. They will work with the San Diego FWS personnel to document the ongoing projects. Canon supports the NANPA scholars by providing the equipment for the students to use during the week; they will be providing the new 7D Mk IIs and 1Dx cameras and lenses from 800 mm to 17 mm tilt shift.

This year’s group has seven graduate students and five undergraduates; six biology majors, most of the others are science majors (ecology, wildlife management, etc.), and one photography major. Ten come from all over the US and two students will be coming from Canada.

If you are attending the NANPA Summit in February, please say hello and introduce yourself to the scholars!

To learn more about the program, please visit:

If you’d like to support this program, please consider donating to the NANPA Foundation, a 501(c)-3 non-profit organization. All donations are tax-deductible.


© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson


VOLUNTEERS OF NANPA: Cindy Miller Hopkins

Cindy Miller Hopkins is a full-time travel and wildlife photographer. Her images can be seen on the pages of hundreds of textbooks, travel brochures, calendars and other consumer products, as well as U.S. and international magazines. Her freelance, workshop and assignment career has taken her to seven continents and more than 140 countries. Cindy is a long-time member of the American Society of Picture Professionals and, currently, co-president of the NANPA Foundation Board. When she’s not traveling (which isn’t often) she lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Norway camera lg

© Cindy Miller Hopkins

What is your “day” job?
I’m a full- time stock and assignment photographer specializing in travel, nature and cultural imagery. An average year for me includes over 175 days of travel with about 60 percent assignment work and 40 percent freelance. I also teach photo workshops on small expedition-style cruise ships, and I’ve led a few photo tours for the NANPA Foundation. Read the rest of this entry »


MJ KananaskisMary Jane Gibson is an advanced nature photographer as well as a naturalist, writer and educator. She specializes in birds. When Mary Jane took up serious nature photography in the late eighties, she installed a backyard stream and a blind and started shooting. Since then, she has designed several other backyard wildlife habitats.  Although Mary Jane currently lives in an apartment in Mill Creek, Washington, she plans to have her next home in the Puget Sound area surrounded by wildlife. She currently is traveling for nature and travel photography as much as possible, both locally and abroad. She has been active in the NANPA Foundation and several NANPA committees.

What is your “day” job?

I no longer have a day job, having retired in 2001 to travel, photograph and participate more fully in volunteer work. I began doing nature photography seriously in 1987, especially birds and wildlife, and although I do not market my work, it is my passion to improve constantly and produce professional quality results. I have grown over the years and learned so much from being in NANPA with its outstanding members, workshops and presentations. Read the rest of this entry »

PHILIP HYDE GRANT: San Pedro Mezquital Project by Jaime Rojo




Applications for the 2014 Philip Hyde Grant are due on November 30th, 2013. This $2,500 grant, provided by Fine Print Imaging through its Art for Conservation program, the NANPA Environment Committee and individual donations, is awarded annually by the NANPA Foundation to an individual NANPA member who is actively pursuing completion of a peer-reviewed environmental project that is consistent with the missions of NANPA and the NANPA Foundation. Click here to apply


Project Update from Jaime Rojo: 2012 Recipient of the Philip Hyde Grant

The San Pedro Mezquital project is an ongoing communications effort to protect the last free-flowing river in the Western Sierra Madre, Mexico. The river is under threat by several development projects, including a dam in the middle basin and a huge tourist resource in the upper basin.

The Philip Hyde Grant that I obtained in May 2012 was used to continue the documentation of this huge river basin, but also to give public presentations in the upper and lower basin to involve the local communities in the actions to protect the river.

In May 2012, we inaugurated a large format exhibit of the San Pedro Mezquital that was hosted by the three main cities of the basin, following the course of the river on its way to the sea. I gave presentations on Durango and Tepic on the day of the exhibit launch, and had meetings with regional authorities involved in the management of the river basin:

– Durango, upper basin, May 2012

– Presidio, middle basin, Oct 2012

– Tepic, lower basin, Jan 2013

Also, in January 2013, I did a 2-week expedition with my colleague Octavio Aburto, co-financed by National Geographic Explorers Fund, to document some of the most remote parts of the upper basin (Chachacuaxtle canyon and the Tres Molinos basin), with some surprising results, and a field blog was published in National Geographic Newswatch.  The Philip Hyde Grant represented a great opportunity to continue the conservation photography work in the San Pedro Mezquital river and I will always be thankful for NANPA’s support.

Please take a moment to check out the San Pedro Mezquital website, and this multimedia piece that I produced for NANPA Foundation called San Pedro Mezquital.


Children at a project exhibit in Durango, Mexico

Children at a project exhibit in Durango, Mexico


by Paul Colangelo

Unnamed tributary of Chismore Creek, British Columbia, 2010The Sacred Headwaters in northern British Columbia is the shared birthplace of three great salmon rivers—the Stikine, Skeena and Nass. It is also the traditional territory of the Tahltan First Nation, and it supports a vast ecosystem known for large numbers of moose, caribou, sheep, goats, wolves and bears.

In 2004, Shell obtained tenure of nearly a million acres in the heart of the Sacred Headwaters for a coal bed methane development that would entail thousands of wells connected by roads and pipelines, fracturing wildlife habitat. The water-intensive fracking process that would be used to remove the methane risked altering water levels and contaminating the rivers. Read the rest of this entry »

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