Posts tagged ‘nanpa’

Take It All In And Give It All Back by Dewitt Jones

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by Dewitt Jones

I took the podium and looked out over the room: seven hundred men and women, some of the finest nature photographers in the world. This was the North American Nature Photographer’s Association’s (NANPA) Second Annual Forum and it was my job to bring it to a close.

That morning, I had holed up in my hotel room trying to come up with what I would say. My mind wandered back over my own career as a photographer — not so much the photographs but rather the experiences and the lessons I had learned.

I thought about the natural cycles I had so often witnessed while photographing – the seasons, the tides, the rising and setting of the sun. How many thousands of times I had I watched them? Like watching the smooth muscle of the planet — the things our little orb can’t help but do. Like watching the earth breathe.  

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Documenting Diversity: the Madrean Archipelago Biodiversity Assessment

by Charles Hedgcock

 

During the revolution Martín Luis Guzmán rode the train through Navojoa and looked over at the sierra and felt what we all do when we see its green folds rising up off the desert. We all wonder what is up there and in some part of us, that rich part where our mind plays beyond our commands, we all dread and lust for what is up there.

-Charles Bowden, The Secret Forest

 

In 2009 the Tucson based environmental group “Sky Island Alliance” launched a visionary initiative to explore, document and protect one of the world’s premier biodiversity hotspots, the Madrean Archipelago of the North American continent. This 70,000 square-mile region of sky-island mountain ranges, surrounded by “seas” of desertscrub and grasslands, straddles the borderlands of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico.

Commonly referred to as the Sky Islands, the Madrean Archipelago is a globally unique region where several major biogeographic provinces overlap, creating a region of biological richness found nowhere else on Earth.  This richness caused Conservation International to name the region one of the world’s Biodiversity Hotspots in 2004.  Despite its proximity to the U.S. border, the Mexican portion of this remote and rugged area has received little biological study; thus the Madrean Archipelago Biodiversity Assessment (MABA) was born, an international effort to study a globally important region.

Arizona Walking Stick

Arizona Walking Stick. © Charles Hedgcock

With support from U.S. and Mexican experts in the fields of botany, entomology, ornithology, herpetology, mammalogy, and other disciplines, MABA expeditions are truly international and provide an opportunity to collect critical biodiversity data, foster graduate and undergraduate research, raise awareness about conservation in the region and develop important relationships with landowners, and land managers, on both sides of the border.

I have had the good fortune of being invited to participate in the MABA expeditions as the lead photographer since its inception. I often accompany a herpetologist into the field and provide photographic vouchers of the reptiles and amphibians we encounter. In addition, I document habitat types and capture images of the biologist at work.

After a day in the field, I continue to photograph herpetological, botanical, and entomological specimens brought back to camp by other teams of biologists. These animals must all be photographed that evening so that they may be returned, unharmed, to their point of capture the next morning. My images not only help document the diversity of life found in these remote mountain ranges, but also help to tell the story of this amazing project, its expeditions, and the many people involved.

Major findings from MABA expeditions include the discovery ofseveral new plant species as well as documenting many plant species previously unknown to the state of Sonora. MABA entomologists continue to make new discoveries, documenting more than 10 species of invertebrates that are new to science. Range extensions for a variety of species are frequently recorded.

Green Ratsnake

Green Ratsnake; Sonora, Mexico. © Charles Hedgcock

One of the greatest achievements of the Madrean Archipelago Biodiversity Assessment has been the development of a growing, online database of biodiversity. It is a remarkable natural history tool that provides access to the region’s foremost collection of specimen records and species observations for anyone seeking to learn more about the Sky Islands. This database currently contains nearly 78,000 animal records and almost 35,000 plant records for the states of Arizona, New Mexico, Sonora, and Chihuahua.  These data represent the products of MABA research expeditions as well as data from herbaria, museum collections, agencies and scientific literature. The database (www.madrean.org) is freely accessible to all.

 

Charles Hedgcock will share his experiences working with the MABA project and discuss some of the techiques he uses to document the amazing diversity of life found during the numerous MABA expeditions at the 2015 NANPA Summit taking place in San Diego, California from February 19th – 22nd. To learn more about the Summit and to register for this program and others like it, please visit www.naturephotographysummit.com

Exhibit: The Past, Present, and Future of Nature Photography

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The Past, Present, and Future of Nature Photography: The Future – NANPA High School Scholarship Students’ display

 

Photo and story by Lione Clare

Last October, I had the opportunity to visit the International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum (IPHF) in St. Louis, Missouri for its Grand Opening to see my image in, The Past, Present, and Future of Nature Photography exhibit that was on display through January of this year. My photo was one of ten selected from several submissions by recent North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA) High School Scholarship Students for the “Future” part of the exhibition.

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Help Make NANPA a Better Organization

NANPA-logo

 

Please fill out the NANPA Annual Survey!

Each year we survey all NANPA members and stakeholders in order to get their feedback and understand how they feel about key issues. The survey results are used by the Board, Staff and Committees to evaluate our progress and set direction for NANPA.

Your feedback is important to us and we’d like your participation in the NANPA Annual Survey Please use the following link to start the survey:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NANPA2014
It’s important to have input from the greater nature photography community, so we do want feedback from both members and non-members. All feedback is confidential and only presented in summary form without specific attribution.

If you have any questions about the survey, please contact Executive Director, Susan Day (susanday@nanpa.org) or Membership Coordinator, Teresa Ransdell (transdell@nanpa.org).

The survey will take 10-15 minutes of your time. In advance, thank you for your participation.

Web of Water: Four NANPA Members Collaborate for Conservation

Web of Water

Web of Water

 

Check out The Web of Water Project – A Collaboration between NANPA Members jon holloway, Ben Geer Keys, Clay Bolt, and Tom Blagden 

The Web of Water project is a unique partnership with Upstate Forever, Fujifilm, Hub City Press renowned writer John Lane, photographers jon holloway, Ben Geer Keys, Clay Bolt, and Tom Blagden and corporate sponsors. The goal of highlighting through fine art photography the beauty, fragility, and critical importance of the Saluda-Reedy watershed and Lake Greenwood was a five year undertaking.

The Web of Water project tells the story of the watershed and those that depend on it for food, water, business, or recreation. A unique combination of beautiful and alarming images raise awareness about the watershed’s importance to the surrounding landscape and communities, current threats to the watershed’s health, and steps that citizens can take to preserve this precious natural resource in their midst.

This project will provide Upstate Forever with new opportunities to educate the community. Photography is one of the most powerful communication tools in assigning a higher sense of value to our environment. Often in the field of research, the visual connection between science and community is the untold story. This project will help bridge the gap and become a catalyst for community responsibility, awareness of cause and effect, and provide the public with unique opportunity to directly make a difference in the future of South Carolina.

www.webofwaterbook.com

 

Here are a few images from the Web of Water Project:

 

Eastern newt, Jones Gap State park, Image by Tom Blagden

Eastern newt, Jones Gap State park, Image by Tom Blagden

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In Our Yard by Amy Shutt

Alstroemeria psittacina 'Parrot Lily'

Alstroemeria psittacina ‘Parrot Lily’

Images and Text by Amy Shutt

We live on 7.5 acres of land in a little town in Louisiana. Although I’ve only been here for a few years, my husband, an ornithologist, has been living here for quite some time. It’s 95% woods. He gardens the area around the house exclusively for hummingbirds and the rest is untouched. Yep, we are the eccentric neighbors with the overgrown yard with signs designating the ditch in the front as a ‘Wildflower Area’ so the city won’t cut or spray.

I see swamp rabbits almost daily. We have deer…and deer ticks. I have heard foxes in the darkness just off the driveway in the woods. We have enjoyed listening to coyotes howling in unison. Barred owls belt out their crazy calls nightly. Prothonotary Warblers nest in boxes we make for them around the house and in the woods.  Point is, it’s pretty cool out here and we share this land with a lot of critters and plants.  Read the rest of this entry »

Bird Photography at Mono Lake by Marie Read

Wilson's Phalaropes (Phalaropus tricolor) flock at South Tufa, Mono Lake, California, USA

Wilson’s Phalaropes (Phalaropus tricolor) flock at South Tufa, Mono Lake, California, USA

Story and Photographs by Marie Read

Mono Lake is one of California’s most photogenic locations, a well-known destination for landscape photographers worldwide. Bizarre rocky spires called tufa towers punctuate the waters and shoreline of this desert sea, while the snow-capped Sierra Nevada forms a spectacular backdrop to the west. The well-kept secret is that Mono Lake and its surroundings are great for bird photography as well.

Mono Lake’s alkaline, highly saline water supports no fish, but it teems with brine shrimp and alkali flies, providing food for numerous breeding birds, including California Gulls, American Avocets, and Snowy Plovers. Osprey nest atop the tufa, commuting to and from freshwater lakes nearby for fish for their young. Around the lake sagebrush scrub, pinyon-juniper, and conifer-aspen woodlands support many other birds. I’d like to share some of my favorite bird photography spots. Read the rest of this entry »

Photo Contests: A Great Opportunity for Up-and-Coming Nature Photographers

 

North American Porcupine; Kluane National Park, Yukon Territory

North American Porcupine; Kluane National Park, Yukon Territory, Canada

Story and Photographs by Jenaya Launstein 

If you’ve been wondering about photography contests and whether they’re worth your time and effort, the answer is yes! I have really enjoyed and benefited from the competitions I’ve entered over the past few years, and would like to share some of the benefits, along with the considerations you should be aware of.

Entering photography competitions is a great way to develop your skills, and should you be successful, build a name for yourself along the way. There are many popular international competitions out there; Windland Smith Rice International Awards by Nature’s Best Photography, BBC/NHM Wildlife Photographer of the Year, NWF’s National Wildlife Photo Contest and Audubon Magazine Photography Awards, just to name a few.

Many competitions publish the winners’ and finalists’ images in magazines, offering even further exposure. The people who see these images could be potential print customers or even editors looking for talented photographers. Beyond getting your name out there, many photographers enter competitions for the great prizes! Some competitions offer cash awards or gift cards for photo gear, even photography adventures. I have a great collection of camera bags and other accessories now, thanks to these competitions!

There’s no question that winning a big competition will get your name out to many new people and possibilities, however don’t pass up the national and regional competitions. Although smaller, they are a great place to start! You are still getting your name out there, and in many cases you will receive beneficial feedback on your images.

By placing in the youth category of the annual Canadian Geographic Wildlife Photography of the Year competitions, I’ve had several of my images displayed in Canada’s Museum of Nature the past three years. They were also included in a traveling exhibition throughout the country that has resulted in print sales and additional exposure for my photography.

Rocky Mountain Elk; Banff, Alberta, Canada

Rocky Mountain Elk; Banff, Alberta, Canada

In 2011, I won the youth category in the popular NWF National Wildlife Photo Contest. To say I was excited is an understatement! Three years after the contest, I was contacted last month by someone, who had looked through the winner’s gallery, interested in purchasing several of my prints! In 2013, I was named the Youth Photographer of the Year in the Windland Smith Rice International Awards by Nature’s Best Photography. The exposure that is generating for me is nothing short of incredible.

Don’t just stick with your favorite subjects! I’m almost exclusively a wildlife photographer, but in 2012, I entered and won the Grand Prize in the Western Heritage Values photo contest with a picture I took of my dad and brother. The prize included airfare for two to the destination of my choice! I knew immediately where I would go, and a few months later I was photographing bears, moose and more in Alaska and the Yukon Territories. It was an amazing experience and the images I captured there are among my all-time favorites. One of the images I captured was the image chosen as the winner in the Windland Smith Rice Awards.

One of the most important things you must do before entering any competition, however, is to read the terms and conditions thoroughly, and understand what image rights you are giving to the organizers. Even though the contest may have great prizes, the rights they demand may not make it a wise decision for you to enter. The conditions attached to any competition, is the number one factor in my decision of whether I submit any images.

You should also pay close attention to the rules and guidelines of the competition. What type of images are allowed? What are the limitations on processing, cropping, etc? Be sure to follow their instructions for file size, naming, EXIF info and color settings.

If you agree with the terms and understand the rules, I encourage you to enter! You never know what doors it could open up for you. Placing and winning in photo competitions has really helped my career to lift off, even at age 16!

Bohemian Waxwing eating berries; Pincher Creek, Alberta, Canada

Bohemian Waxwing eating berries; Pincher Creek, Alberta, Canada

Now, some of you may still be reluctant. You might think that you’re not good enough yet, or don’t have the best camera or lenses. Don’t let that keep you from choosing a good competition to start with and submitting your best! And if you really don’t think you’re ready yet, keep practicing! Go to a nearby park or natural area and find something to photograph so you can develop your eye. It’s also a great idea to ask other photographers for feedback on your images. Their advice can really help you improve your work. So get out there and create some award-winning images of your own!

 

16 year old Jenaya Launstein, was one of ten selected for NANPA’s 2013 High School Scholarship Program. You can follow her on Twitter.

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