PHOTOGRAPHER PROJECT: Mountaintop Removal – Story and photographs by Carl Galie

8 Billion Gallons

8 Billion Gallons

I thought I knew all there was to know about strip mining, since I grew up in coal country in a mining family and even spent some time selling truck parts to the mining industry early in my career. Then in 2009, I was invited by members of Kentuckians for the Commonwealth and St. Vincent’s Mission to go on a tour of a mountaintop removal (MTR) site in Floyd County, Kentucky, with a group of students from Berea College. I was not prepared for what I saw that morning.

Yes, it was a strip mine. But it was a strip mine on steroids. It went on for miles. At the end of the tour, I was asked by Sister Kathleen Weigand from St Vincent’s Mission if I would consider doing a book on MTR, and I immediately said yes.

New River 1

New River 1

Approximately 500 mountains and more than 2,000 miles of streams already had been destroyed by MTR throughout the southern Appalachians. My research revealed that MTR was not an isolated problem in Kentucky. It had affected all of coal country. Furthermore, legislation passed to accommodate the coal industry had the potential to affect water quality across the United States, making MTR a national problem.

A number of scientific papers were published in 2009 on the impact MTR was having on the waters of Appalachia and public health. President Obama had just taken office, and I expected that the EPA would finally be allowed to do its job and put an end to this mining practice. I was wrong, and six years later, MTR is still going strong.

Since the purpose of my project was to raise awareness and educate the public about MTR, I decided that a book—added to several books and powerful documentaries I knew were already in production—might not be the best way for me to get the story out. I decided to take my project in a slightly different direction: a fine art exhibit that would focus on the beauty of the region and what could be lost.

I reasoned that a traveling art exhibit could reach a different and broader audience and have a better chance to be viewed—not only by those against MTR, but also by those supportive of the mining industry. I partnered with Appalachian Voices and The New River Conservancy, two organizations working to protect the region, and with SouthWings—an NGO (nongovernmental organization) located in Asheville, North Carolina, which provided my flights. Funding for the exhibit came from grants provided by Art for Conservation and The Blessings Project Foundation.

Lost on the Road to Oblivion

Lost on the Road to Oblivion

In 2013, the exhibit, “Lost on the Road to Oblivion, the Vanishing Beauty of Coal Country,”opened at the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts at Appalachian State University. I collaborated with then-poet laureate of North Carolina, Joseph Bathanti, and the exhibit included 13 of Joseph’s poems in addition to 59 of my prints.

Joseph’s and my collaboration continues, and he has agreed to write poems about more of the prints in the exhibit. We are currently working on exhibit scheduling for 2015-2016. Oh, and remember the book that got the project going? We’re revisiting that idea as well.

Carl Galie is a North Carolina photographer who has worked on conservation issues for the past 19 years. Carl was awarded the first Art for Conservation Grant in August 2010 for his project “Lost on the Road to Oblivion, The Vanishing Beauty of Coal Country.” In March 2014, Carl received Wild South’s Roosevelt-Ashe conservation award for journalism for his work documenting mountaintop removal of coal in the Appalachians.

4 thoughts on “PHOTOGRAPHER PROJECT: Mountaintop Removal – Story and photographs by Carl Galie

  1. Carl, I just want to voice my appreciation for the work you have done to protect the Kentucky environment from strip mining through your exhibit. I, too, would like to participate in just such a project to raise awareness and support of environmental issues. I live in the Pacific Northwest, so it will probably be something in this area.

    Congratulations and thank you!

  2. Carl,
    The exhibit that you and North Carolina poet laureate, Joseph Bathanti, created provides a powerful “picture” of the important issue of mountaintop removal. It illuminates the issue to a wide audience sometimes missed by more traditional means. It serves as an example to every photographer by demonstrating that we can positively impact our environment.

    I feel inspired to search for a way that I can make a difference with my photographs. After all, we know that a powerful picture is worth more than a thousand words. Thank you.
    Cheryl

  3. Carl,
    Thanks so much for this heart-felt article. Growing up in the coalfields in southern West Virginia, I have witnessed what this industry has done to not only the mountains, but to the communities and welfare of the folks living there. Thanks for all you are doing to bring to increase awareness to others about this issue.

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