Connecting with Nature on California Coast with Jacqueline Deely

Join award-winning wildlife photographer and naturalist Jacqueline Deely for an inspirational weekend of photography amid a spectacular setting along California’s rugged central coast. Camp Ocean Pines in Cambria is a rustic camp sitting on thirteen acres of Monterey Pine forest that nearly meets the ocean shore. Wildlife abounds, with seals and otters swimming by, and deer roaming through the property.

Throughout the weekend, explore how we can connect with nature, learn about our environment and make a difference through our experiences and the images we capture. Field activities visit nearby locations with specific goals in mind. We will take advantage of optimal light in the early morning and evening and when wildlife tends to be most active. Classroom sessions include illustrated presentations and discussions evolve around our own unique moments and encounters in the wild. Sharing our work allows us to delve deeper into the thought process behind our photographs and the stories they tell.

Although not required, staying on-site at Camp Ocean Pines is highly recommended to enhance the overall experience. Accommodations are shared in comfortable straw bale cabins, engineered for passive solar efficiency, and constructed from timbers and siding milled from wind-felled trees on the property. It will be a wonderful way to stay connected with nature and fellow participants throughout the entire weekend.

All meals are included except dinner on Saturday night, which will be free for participants to visit and dine in the quaint town of Cambria. Alcohol is not available at the camp, but you are welcome to bring your own.

Transportation to the various field locations will be in our own vehicles with the plan to carpool.

This workshop is tremendous value and open to anyone with a love of nature and photography. All levels are welcome: however, students must have a basic understanding of how to operate their own equipment.

 

$402 with meals and lodging / $350 with meals and no lodging

From the Archives: Capture to print—creating eye-catching black-and-white landscapes

Editor’s Note:  NANPA is fortunate to have collected a library of excellent blog posts over the years.  We add new members all the time, and our long-time members may not recall a specific post, which they may find more useful than when it was first published because their interests have changed.  Regardless, we’re going to share posts “From the Archives” from time to time.  The post below by Dana Warnquist was posted in June 2017.   DL

 

Text and photography by Dana Warnquist

“Is that an Ansel Adams photograph,” she asked. “No,” the gallery owner replied with a chuckle. “It’s a local photographer.” Overhearing this exchange, I could feel my face warm as I flushed with both pride and embarrassment. True story.

Winter wonderland; Firehole Canyon, Yellowstone National Park. ©Copyright Dana Warnquist

Winter wonderland; Firehole Canyon, Yellowstone National Park. © Copyright Dana Warnquist

While my art certainly cannot be compared to that of master photographer Ansel Adams, his photographs and philosophies about protecting our natural environment have inspired and motivated me to capture eye-catching black-and-white images. Not everyone can create iconic landscape images like Adams, but with a few basic steps, from capture to print; stunning black-and-white images can be produced by even the newest DSLR (digital single lens reflex) camera owners. Continue reading

Capture to print—creating eye-catching black-and-white landscapes

Text and photography by Dana Warnquist

“Is that an Ansel Adams photograph,” she asked. “No,” the gallery owner replied with a chuckle. “It’s a local photographer.” Overhearing this exchange, I could feel my face warm as I flushed with both pride and embarrassment. True story.

Winter wonderland; Firehole Canyon, Yellowstone National Park. ©Copyright Dana Warnquist

Winter wonderland; Firehole Canyon, Yellowstone National Park. © Copyright Dana Warnquist

While my art certainly cannot be compared to that of master photographer Ansel Adams, his photographs and philosophies about protecting our natural environment have inspired and motivated me to capture eye-catching black-and-white images. Not everyone can create iconic landscape images like Adams, but with a few basic steps, from capture to print; stunning black-and-white images can be produced by even the newest DSLR (digital single lens reflex) camera owners. Continue reading