Florida Wildlife with John Slonina

Florida Birds and Wildlife (Everglades and Big Cypress)
Escape the cold and join us in paradise as we photograph the wild areas of Florida. We will be photographing Alligators, Nesting Eagles, Ospreys, Hawks, Owls, Pelicans, Spoonbills, Herons and Alligators and many more species of wildlife. We will explore beautiful coastlines and swamps. The majority of the time we will spend at my favorite Everglades and Big Cypress national parks.

This workshop is led by professional nature photographer John Slonina who has been leading tours there for several years.
Small Group Size: 6 People
Transportation Provided to and from Airport. You do not have to rent a car.

All skill levels

John Slonina
Slonina Photography
Email: jtslonina@aol.com
Phone: 508-736-1167
http://www.sphotography.com

Birds of San Diego County with Tim Boyer

Photograph Brown Pelicans, and cormorants in breeding plumage, and ducks, herons, shorebirds, gulls, terns, and skimmers. There are 60+ species of birds possible on this workshop. We go to more places and photograph more birds than other groups. We’ll also do some landscape photography of the Pacific Ocean, piers and waves at sunset. Four and a half days of instruction, with four morning, and four afternoon/evening shooting sessions. We’ll also do at least two post-processing session in the early afternoon.

Ecuador Birds with David Stimac

Ecuador – a country about the size of Colorado – boasts over 1600 species of birds, 130 of them hummingbirds! Join me for an intensive workshop focusing on the many colorful hummingbirds, tanagers and other birds of the cloud forests. HIGHLIGHTS:
We’ll be staying at three beautiful locations and visiting many more. From the cloud forests on the eastern slope of the Andes to the arctic-like paramo of the highlands, down to the lowlands of the west slope, we will cover many different habitats and see a dizzying array of birds. I’ve reserved some of the best accommodations and bird photography locations available, and we will have an expert local guide with us for the entire workshop. Along with the birds, we will also have great opportunities for landscape and macro photography. You’ll find all of this on a backdrop of fantastic mountain scenery, mysterious cloud forest landscapes and rushing mountain streams, plus stunning orchids, butterflies, moths, reptiles and amphibians.

WHAT’S INCLUDED:
11 nights lodging
All meals during the tour as described below
All ground transportation
Small group size – plenty of room for everyone
Extensive in-the-field instruction
Use of multi-flash equipment and accessories
Post-processing tips & image review sessions in the evenings
Local expert bird guiding
http://www.davidstimac.com/p/ecuador-workshop

Bosque del Apache & White Sands with David Stimac

This is an intensive photo tour designed to give you as many chances as possible to come away with a large and varied collection of images. Since this tour is limited to 6 participants, you will get the attention and guidance you’ve come to expect on one of my tour.

http://www.davidstimac.com/p/bosque-del-apache

WHAT’S INCLUDED:
5 full days of photography (mornings and late afternoon/evenings)
Professional tips and guidance in the field
Photoshop instruction during midday and evenings
Image critique

Located along the Rio Grande, Bosque del Apache is a winter paradise for Snow Geese, Sandhill Cranes, and other waterbirds. I’ve spent a lot of time at Bosque and have earned numerous publishing credits as a result. I’ll share my expertise to help you create an impressive portfolio from this amazing location. This is a very special place where normally wary birds are very approachable. Because wind direction and cloud cover are important factors when photographing birds in flight, my experience at the refuge will optimize your time wisely. The later date of this trip helps us avoid the crowds and dust and guarantees that most ducks will be in great plumage!

During the first three days we will capture many birds in flight as well as landscapes full of roosting birds, and there will be many opportunities for beautiful silhouettes, panoramas and motion blurs. Each day we will be at the refuge well before dawn so we’ll have ample time to strategize on the best locations depending on wind direction and cloud cover. After a morning shoot at the refuge on day 4 we will head south to Alamogordo, our operating base for the fantastic White Sands National Monument. We’ll make some stops along the way, including the fascinating Three Rivers Petroglyph Site. This area has more than 21,000 glyphs of birds, humans, animals, fish, insects and plants, as well as numerous geometric and abstract designs scattered over 50 acres of New Mexico’s northern Chihuahuan Desert. From there we will spend the evening as well as the next morning and evening at White Sands. I’ve made special arrangements for early and late entry into White Sands so that we will be there for the best light. The windblown sand, yuccas, distant mountains & hopefully, dramatic skies will give us plenty of inspiring scenes to frame!

Bosque del Apache NWR with Irene Hinke-Sacilotto and Sandy Zelasko

Co-Leaders: Irene Hinke-Sacilotto & Sandy Zelasko:
Along the Rio Grande River, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge covers more than 57,000 acres and is a major wintering ground for cranes and waterfowl. To feed the huge number of birds visiting the refuge each year, nearby fields are planted with corn, wheat, millet, and other grains. Loop roads transect the refuge marshes and fields and provide prime sites for wildlife photography. Species that may be seen include shovelers, buffleheads, pintails, teal and other ducks, eagles, hawks, turkey, meadowlarks, quail, roadrunners, coyotes, mule deer, and more.

In late November and early December, thousands of snow geese and sandhill cranes will be present on the refuge. From the wetlands where they spend the night, at dawn the geese and other waterfowl rise in-mass and sweep overhead on their way to feed in field in a must-see spectacle. Each day we will arrive at the refuge at dawn to photograph this event plus local wildlife. After a short mid-day break, we will return and continue photographing until sundown. Includes two experienced leaders who have scouted this year’s best photo locations prior to your arrival, an orientation PowerPoint presentation, one-on-one instruction in the field, and a critique of images for on-site feedback. To register, contact Sandy Zelasko with Sandra Lee Photography, Phone: 760-749-2174

Channel Islands National Park – America’s Galapagos

Story and Photography by Jerry Ginsberg

 

Camping on Anacapa will allow you to capture a great sunrise from spectacular Inspiration Point at the island’s east end.  © Jerry Ginsberg

                               
We are accustomed to driving to our national parks. This is definitely not the case with Channel Islands National Park. This little archipelago of a half-dozen rocks jutting out of the Pacific Ocean a few miles off the coast of central California is reachable only by a short boat ride. This rather contradictory blend of remoteness and accessibility offers some unique opportunities for us photographers.

The Channel Islands are called America’s Galapagos – and for good reason. A wide variety of birds and pinnipeds are in plentiful supply. Western gulls find safety here. Continue reading

Volunteer Profile: Lisa Langell

Lisa Langell is a professional nature & wildlife photographer who specializes in birds and mammals. She has lived in Michigan, and currently lives in Arizona, where she has discovered an entirely new photographic environment. Lisa often submits her work to the annual NANPA Showcase competition, and has won several awards, including 2nd place in the “Mammals” category in 2015. Her work has been published in numerous magazines, including the March 2017 issue of Arizona Highways. She serves NANPA as a member of the Board of Directors, as well as a certified instructor.

Perusing the website of nature photographer Lisa Langell, one of NANPA’s new board members, provides the viewer a feast of beautiful images of our natural world and the wildlife that inhabits it. In addition, you will find some images that are not usually within the purview of a nature photographer – street photography, for example, which is focused on images of people, and a gallery of “machine” images. You can find all of this and more at langellphotography.com.

Lisa’s earliest experiences with nature were with her great aunt, who was an avid bird watcher and nature enthusiast. As her interest grew, she picked up a camera and made photographs of the birds she had grown to love.

We recently spoke with Lisa to learn more about the development of her photography, and what she’s working on today. Continue reading

A wastewater wonderland

Story and photography by Budd Titlow

Do you want to knock your birding and photography socks off without busting your bank account? And—in the process—get to witness a prime example of sustainable water management for wildlife habitat enhancement and climate-change control?

If so, just grab your binoculars and camera gear and head to the Brevard County Wastewater Treatment Plant located in the east-central Florida town of Viera, Florida—just 2.5 miles west of I-95. There you’ll find 200 acres of constructed wetlands that are supported and nourished by advanced treatment outflow from the treatment plant. You’ll also find some of the best and easiest wild birdwatching and photography you’ve ever experienced. It’s called the Viera Wetlands.

Typical view of habitat provided by Viera’s sewage-treatment wetlands.

Establishment of the Viera Wetlands has been a phenomenal success. These created aquatic habitats now provide living spaces for more than 160 species of birds, but—perhaps best of all—the birding and photography access is as easy as pie. A network of 2.4 miles of one-way, 10 mph gravel roads—perched atop the earthen berms—allows superb opportunities for virtually every square foot of the sanctuary. Continue reading

Winter duck fix – reflections on Barnegat Lighthouse, NJ

Story and photography by Martin Sneary

Harlequin Duck, adults calling © Martin Sneary

Barnegat Lighthouse is one of those fabled winter bird photography destinations on the New Jersey shore. A rocky jetty (think wall of large boulders) runs SE into the Atlantic Ocean for just under 1 mile, with a sandy shore to one side, and the Barnegat Inlet/Atlantic Ocean to the other. This location affords close views of various sea duck that overwinter in the area, perhaps most highly sought after being Harlequin, closely followed by the globally threatened Long-tailed Duck, also known as Oldsquaw. Other species frequently seen on the seaward side are Loons, Scoters and Mergansers, while in the tidal pools that form on the inshore side of the jetty you can find the odd shorebird, including Purple Sandpiper, Turnstone and Black-bellied Plover. Continue reading