Whooping Cranes with Jeff Parker

This boat-based Whooping Crane Photo Tour offers great ops to get great shots of endangered Whooping Cranes at the Texas Gulf. This photo tour sells out early every time so, if you’re interested, I suggest that you sign up now!

I have room for just five (5) photographers to join me as we watch and photograph the endangered cranes at their most active, feasting upon the Gulf-Coast bounty. These particular birds are descended from nature’s last wild flock.

The Whooping Crane Photo Tour includes two extensive boat-based photo shoots during which we’ll create images of the Whooping Cranes of Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.

The fun continues after our boat-based shoots with afternoon photo excursions in and around Rockport and Port Aransas where we’ll focus our lenses on colorful shrimp boats, the marina, Brown and White Pelicans, Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons, Ibis, Forster’s Tern, Black Skimmers, Roseate Spoonbills, American Oystercatchers, other shorebirds, raptors, and more.

Watch the behavior of North America’s tallest birds in their wintering habitat along Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. Observe juveniles interacting with their parents. Wonder at the birds’ size and elegant gawkiness. Enjoy listening to the unique sound of their trumpeting calls. Photograph them pulling blue crabs up from estuary mud.

We will have multiple opportunities to take a variety of photographs of this fascinating species. Our boat captain does an amazing job of getting us up-close and personal with the birds (without disturbing them).

More info: http://exploreinfocus.com/joinme/whooping-crane-photo-tour/
Or call Jeff at (512) 378-3355
Limited to five (5) photographers

NATURE’S VIEW: Photographing from a Boat During a Cold Alaskan Rain, Part 2, by Jim Clark

Sea Otter 08212013 Southeast AK (c) Jim Clark

Sea Otter 08212013 Southeast AK (c) Jim Clark

Story and photograph by Jim Clark

In the last issue of eNews (Part I), I wrote about a private cruise along the Alaskan Coast where I was invited to teach photography. In that piece, I emphasized the importance of keeping your equipment and yourself safe and weatherproof when photographing from a small boat. Now that we are warm and cozy, and our equipment is protected from the fickle elements of the weather, let’s explore some shooting techniques.

Unless you are photographing from a ship (remember, a boat fits on a ship, but a ship cannot fit on a boat), a tripod is not going to be useful. There is too much wave action and other vibration-causing variables, such as boat motors, breaching whales, splashing seals and such. Handholding your equipment is the way to go on a small skiff. Having the luxury of great technology today is helpful in achieving sharp images when handholding gear. Continue reading