Botswana with Suzi Eszterhas

• Botswana is known for being the VERY best place in Africa for willdife photography and we’ll use only exclusive, private concessions that are free of crowds, allow off-road travel, and offer luxurious accommodations.
• Our concessions include “predator meccas” that offer unparalleled photo opportunities of lions, leopards, cheetahs, and wild dogs, as well as elephants, other classic game. We’ll also have close, intimate encounters with the most habituated meerkats in Africa, as well as the Kalahari bushmen they share their home with.
• While many photo tours avoid the best concessions to save on cost, we stay in the best camps to maximize our wildlife sightings. Many tours also avoid the best seasons, also to save on cost, whereas this tour is planned for the very best time of year for sightings.
• For all game drives on the tour, each participant will have an entire row to themselves for easy shooting from both sides of the vehicle and space to accommodate your gear – this is very rare for Botswana safaris.
• ALL flights are private charter flights for our group only, enabling us to bring more gear.
• Many Botswana photo tours are only 7 nights in duration, whereas our tour is 12 nights. This gives us enough time to experience the photo opportunities that each spectacular location has to offer.
• Although we have chosen locations based on wildlife viewing, these concessions also have some of the best accommodations in all of Africa. Our camps are small, elegant and luxurious.
• Travel as a small group and receive one-to-one instruction from professional wildlife photographer Suzi Eszterhas. Suzi has published over 100 magazine covers and feature stories and has vast experience photographing African wildlife (including 3 years living in a bushcamp).

Kenya Photography Tour with Daniel J. Cox


Our 14th KENYA PHOTOGRAPHY EXPEDITION is among the best locations to photograph wildlife in the world. If you’ve never visited this magical country, be prepared for incredible wildlife and cultural experiences. From the monkeys trying to get into your tent to the lion prides of the Mara, YOU WILL ENJOY! The photography opportunities are endless and your stories will be shared for many years to come.

We’ll fly between lodges, and this year we’ve also added two extra nights on safari (2 nights in Nairobi and 12 nights at the lodges) along with a private encounter at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust elephant orphanage. Only 3-4 guests max per safari vehicle! Kenya will not get better than it is now—join us!

South Africa Safari with Tom Mace

What is Included?
• Round Trip Airfare from Atlanta GA to Johannesburg South Africa (15 hr non-stop flight)
• Overnight Stay at Hotel D’Oreale Grande, in Johannesburg
• Transfer to Makutsi Game Reserve
• 7 Nights, 8 Days
• Daily Game Drives
• Breakfast and Dinner Included, Lunch is on your own at restaurant on site
• Lodging in a South African Rondavel (bungalow), including 2 natural spring pools, bar and restaurant.
• Dedicated Photography Instruction, including post processing and critique
• No Single Supplement Charges!
• Non-Photography Spouses/Travelers Welcome

Join us on an amazing photography Safari in South Africa. We will be in a setting where your opportunity to photograph lions, leopards, elephants, rhino, and buffalo (Big 5) are amazingly accessible to our photographers. Giraffe, hippos, crocodiles, cheetah, and many other hoofed and clawed animals will be on show during this excursion. Our visit in late August is during the dry season where the grasses are short and the wildlife congregates around water. There will be ample opportunities to capture the rich diversity of nature from our open top Safari vehicles to the back porch of your Rondavel. Our lodging is a unique private reserve with over 9,000 hectares or roughly 22,000 acres of vast African nature, about an hour drive west of Kruger National Park. The surreal camp is not fenced, which allows wildlife to roam and offers client’s unique possibilities to photograph from their deck. Whether you are an experienced or hobbyist photographer, this trip will afford you incredible opportunities to capture wildlife photographs of a lifetime. During this trip, Tom will be instructing you on both the technical and creative aspects of wildlife photography while at the resort and on Safari. He will spend time supporting you and your attempts to capture amazing pictures, regardless of subject and setting.

A tale of two brothers

Text and photography by Teri Franzen

Life in the African bush is hard for prey animals and apex predators (those at the top of the food chain) alike.  Ungulates (hooved animals) such as zebras, gazelles and wildebeest are constantly wary and keeping watch to ensure they don’t fall victim as food for one of the countless predators that share their territory.  Predators fight among themselves over that same territory.  Lions will fight to take control of existing prides.  They will also fight to drive off other predators, like cheetahs, sharing the same space.  Very often these battles have grim results for the victims.

During my recent trip to Ndutu in northern Tanzania (eastern Africa) we saw many cheetah families living in the Makao plains.  Among them were two bachelor brothers that we had hoped to encounter during our journeys.  With a top speed approaching 70 miles per hour, cheetahs are the fastest land animals in the world.  They can maintain this speed for approximately 500 yards.  As a singular animal a cheetah is capable of chasing down and capturing smaller prey, a favorite being a Thomson’s gazelle.  Adult male cheetahs often form coalitions with siblings.  When teamed up they are capable of bringing down much larger prey, like wildebeest.  We wanted to see this two-male coalition in action.

On January 31, during our morning game drive we happened upon a lone cheetah that had climbed onto a fallen tree.  It started calling and before we identified the gender we suspected a female calling for her young.  As we looked more closely we realized it was a male and that it was injured.  His mouth was wounded and his elbows rubbed raw.   This was one of the brothers, only his sibling was nowhere in sight.  Our best guess was that the two cheetahs had been victims of a lion attack during the night.  Either the second male had been killed or severely injured, or he escaped and ran in another direction.

Injured cheetah searching for his brother.

A closer look at his mouth injury.

The wounded cheetah wandered from tree to tree, sniffing for signs of his brother and then sending a stream of his own urine toward the tree.  Like all cats, cheetahs have a keen sense of smell and can identify an individual by its unique scent.  During this time he called continuously with a forlorn cry, presumably with the hope of vocally contacting his sibling.  Occasionally he would leap onto a fallen tree to search and call from a higher vantage point.  Allowing enough distance to avoid interference we followed the lone male for over an hour.  During that time his pace was constant, his conviction never faltered. Continue reading