COVID-19 and Wildlife in Kenya: Crisis and Hope

A white rhinoceros female (Ceratotherium simum) with an enormous horn stands protectively next to her small calf, The Aberdares, Kenya,Africa
A white rhinoceros female (Ceratotherium simum) with an enormous horn stands protectively next to her small calf, The Aberdares, Kenya, Africa

Story & photos by Jami Tarris

Each of us is drawn to nature photography for our own personal reasons. Some for commercial reasons — to make money. Others because they enjoy sitting in the peace and quiet of nature, waiting for beautiful light. Still others who perhaps enjoy the thrill of capturing animal behavior in front of their very eyes. For me, at the beginning, it was all of the above but, as I spent more time in the field and grew older, it became more about being a champion for innocent and beautiful creatures who needed protecting from, ironically, humans like me. In the midst of a pandemic, it’s easy to see the effects of the COVID-19 virus on humans, but it is also significantly affecting the animal kingdom.

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Creative Homework: Using Texture to Minimize Distractions

Hibiscus with Texture Effect Applied
Hibiscus with Texture

Story & photos by F. M. Kearney

Another month has come and gone, but unfortunately, things haven’t changed that much. Most of the country is now on full or partial lockdown. Each day tends to blend right into the other. There were many things I had planned to shoot this spring which will now, undoubtedly, have to wait until next year. But, that’s a small price to pay compared to the medical superheroes who are fighting on the front lines every day. With field work indefinitely postponed, I thought it best to remove the batteries from all my equipment to prevent corrosion. Nowadays, I spend most of my time working in Photoshop. In my last article, I touched on adding texture effects to old images. Since so many of us are still confined to our homes, I decided to expand on this technique as another way to take advantage of this unprecedented downtime.

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An Hour With A Flower: A Creative Challenge

California poppy photographed with Tamron 18-400mm at 185mm.
California poppy photographed with Tamron 18-400mm at 185mm.

Story & photos by Alyce Bender

Flowers have long been a subject of study within the art world and many photographers feature them in their images. Landscapers look for floral details to bring pops of color to their grand landscape images. Portrait photographers often use flowers to set the seasonal tone. Wildlife photographers understand that flowers also provide a food source for insects and birds while providing a nice background for their subjects.

But when was the last time you took a flower, in and of itself, as the full subject of your frame? When did you spend time approaching that flower as you would a landscape or animal subject when looking for compositions? When was the last time you took an hour with a flower?

If you can’t easily answer that question, now is the perfect time to try this photography challenge. Not only will it provide you with something to photograph, but it will have you thinking outside the box in ways that can be used with other subjects. If your pre-COVID-19 compositions were mostly wide angle or telephoto images, this exercise can help you focus on seeing all the details.

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How Professional Photographers Are Dealing With the COVID-19 Crisis – Part 2

Jon Holloway owns and operates the sundance Gallery in Greenwood, SC.
Jon Holloway owns and operates the sundance Gallery in Greenwood, SC.

The coronavirus pandemic has hit photographers hard. We reached out to some professional photographers to ask how the crisis has affected their businesses. We also wanted to know how they were adapting—both their own lives and their businesses—to the challenges of these difficult times.

We recently spoke with Jon Holloway, a fine art photographer and teacher in Greenwood, South Carolina, who is also a NANPA Board Member and College Scholarship Program Committee Member. (See part one of this series here.)

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Get Busy Close to Home With A Photography Blind

A  photography blind in the field.
Social distancing at its best – a Tragopan V6 photography blind in the field.

Story & photos by Gerrit Vyn

One of the biggest challenges in nature photography is getting close to wildlife. This is especially true in locations outside of parks and refuges where wildlife is often habituated to people. Photography blinds allow you to get into camera range in places that would be impossible to otherwise and allow you to shoot where no one else is shooting – a local woodlot, marsh, or your own backyard bird feeders. Using a photography blind is often the best or only way to photograph a particular species, location, or behavior. A good photography blind is one of the most important tools in a wildlife photographers’ arsenal for getting close. Working from a blind also benefits wildlife. Rather than pursuing and potentially disturbing subjects, the photographer lets subjects come to them. This increases a photographer’s opportunities to shoot natural, undisturbed behavior, and minimizes their impact on wildlife. One of the great things about working from a blind is that if you’ve done your homework and planned well you can be confident you are going to have some unique opportunities for photography.

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How Professional Photographers Are Dealing with the COVID-19 Crisis – Part 1

Mary Louise Ravese (photo by Richard Fain)
Mary Louise Ravese (photo by Richard Fain)

The coronavirus pandemic has hit photographers hard.  Times are tough, but we’re a creative and resilient bunch.  We reached out to some professional photographers to ask how restrictions imposed by cities, states and the federal government have affected their businesses.  We also wanted to know how they were adapting—both their own lives and their businesses—to the challenges of these difficult times. 

The first photographer in this series is Mary Louise Ravese, owner of Bella Vista Photography, a North Carolina-based nature and fine art photographer, teacher and workshop leader.

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Backyard Birdwatching in the Midst of the Pandemic

The author photographing backyard birds from his dining room.
The author photographing backyard birds from his dining room.

Story & photos by Frank W. Baker

Here I am, in Columbia SC, where the weather has taken a turn toward Spring. The azaleas are blooming and the birds outside my windows are quite active.

I’m a big fan of shore and wading birds so, if you’re like me, you’re rather frustrated now that most of the coastline has been placed “off limits” to us as we shelter at home.

Many other bird watching sites are also closed. With nowhere to go, I’m spending more of my time at home. Perhaps, like me, you are taking time to review older images and post some online.

There’s only so much I can do before I need to spend some time away from the computer. A window in my dining room is the perfect spot now because of its unfettered view of my bird feeders.

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How are Photo Stores and Manufacturers Adapting to COVID-19? Part 3

Screen grab: Fotopro home page
Fotopro is offering educational videos, product discounts and (soon) a photographer’s marketplace.

The COVID-19 restrictions are slamming photographers and our businesses, presenting us with many challenges. That’s also true of the companies that provide the products and services we use on a near daily basis. We wondered how they were adapting, retooling and managing this crisis. Today, in part three of this series, we got in touch with Fotopro.

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How are Photo Stores and Manufacturers Adapting to COVID-19? Part 2

COVID-19 has already had a significant impact on all aspects of the photography business. Photographers have had to cancel travel and workshops. Jobs have been canceled. The distributors and manufacturers of the photographic goods and services we can’t live without have also taken it on the chin. They, and we, are creative and resilient.

We reached out to three of the companies that have been supporters of NANPA and some of NANPA’s professional members. Their stories will appear during the coming weeks. Yesterday, we reported on how Tamron has been affected and what they’re doing in response. Today, we look at Hunt’s Photo and Video.

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How are Photo Stores and Manufacturers Adapting to COVID-19? Part 1

Home Page of Tamron's Website

The precautions taken to reduce the spread of the novel corona virus have hit the photography business hard. While the impact on us photographers has been immediate and painful, what about the companies who make the products and services we love and rely on? How has the virus affected them? What are they doing to survive, to continue to service customers and, eventually, thrive?

It’s tough for them, too. Even the companies with quality products, great customer service and smart business operations are being tested.  Supply chains are disrupted. Sales are down. Some have had to temporarily close stores, offices or repair facilities and attempt to work from home. But they’re not just hanging tough, they’re also adapting. They’re adding education, training, support features and more. Still providing value to customers and taking care of employees.

We started by speaking to three of the companies (Tamron, Hunt’s & Fotopro) that have been supporters of NANPA. Over the next few days, you’ll hear what they said.

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