Janie Moore Greene Scholarship Grant

Grant supports a student’s study of photography at the university level

 

© Jiayu Su

Applications are now being accepted for the Janie Moore Greene Scholarship Grant, awarded annually to a student studying photography at a two-year or four-year college, university, art/design or photography school.   The deadline for applications is 11:59 p.m. EDT on October 31, 2017.

“For many years, Janie Moore Greene has supported higher education in photography with her gift to the NANPA Foundation, and we are very grateful to her,” said John Nuhn, president of NANPA Foundation. “Her scholarship grant enables us to assist emerging photographers in their career path and uphold the Foundation’s mission of awareness and appreciation of nature through photography.” Continue reading

Must Attend Event of 2017

2017summitad_regopen

How the NANPA Program Impacted Me

Story and Photography by Jorel Cuomo

Screen Shot 2016-03-16 at 9.52.49 PMWhen I attended NANPA’s High School Scholarship Program (NHSSP) in 2004 in Portland, my eyes opened to exploring wildlife photography as a medium. I greatly benefited from the one-on-one instruction and support of fellow photographers, both peers and mentors. Before attending this program, I never knew all this support existed; I felt that I was exploring nature and my camera by myself. Being a scholarship winner gave me the opportunity to harness my potential. Being surrounding by world-class photographers that shared their knowledge and experience opened my eyes to the possibilities that awaited me in our magnificent world.

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Help the NANPA Foundation Help You – Without an Extra Penny from Your Pocket

Help the NANPA Foundation Help You – Without an Extra Penny from Your Pocket

Don’t know what the NANPA Foundation is – LEARN MORE ON THEIR NEW WEBSITE!

Do you buy from Amazon? If you do – regardless of how often – your purchases can help the NANPA Foundation if you take just 4 easy steps.

First, you may be asking “What is the NANPA Foundation?” The NANPA Foundation is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to:

  • Develop, support and implement nature photography projects jointly with NANPA and other organizations
  • Initiate, partner, operate and raise/promote funding for respective projects
  • Advance the awareness of and appreciation for nature through photography

The Foundation provides the funding for several of NANPA’s programs including the high school program, the college student program and the Philip Hyde Grant. We also have our own programs that we manage and fund including the Janie Moore Greene grant for college scholarship and building photo blinds at refuges, wildlife reserves, state/city parks, or other natural areas.

Contributions to the Foundation are tax deductible – so we are a fundraising arm of NANPA, but a completely separate organization.

 

Back to Amazon & How You Can Help

Now, how can you help the NANPA Foundation while you’re shopping at Amazon?

Amazon is willing to give the NANPA Foundation a percentage of eligible sales made through the AmazonSmile site.

The products are the same as what is on the Amazon site.

The pricing is the same as what is on the Amazon site.

Your same account, cart and other information from the Amazon site is also on the AmazonSmile page – it converts for you!

The AmazonSmile program is just an easier way for Amazon to give back to eligible nonprofits – like NANPA Foundation.

 

How to Participate

  1. Go to https://smile.amazon.com/ch/84-1387612 and login as you would your Amazon account (or create a new account if you do not currently have an Amazon account)
  2. Under “Your Account,” select “Change Your Charity” and search for NANPA.
  3. Click the Select button next to the “NANPA Infinity Foundation” name.
  4. Start shopping!

 

That’s it! NANPA Foundation will be remembered as your charity of choice and a percentage of any eligible purchases you make will be credited to NANPA Foundation anytime you shop on Amazon and go to the AmazonSmile site first – bookmark it!

The NANPA Foundation does not see who makes purchases that support the Foundation and we don’t see what is purchased. We simply get a quarterly payment which is the sum of contributions from eligible purchases made by those who have designated NANPA Foundation as their charity to support.

Thanks for your support of the NANPA Foundation! Learn more at www.nanpafoundation.org.

 

 

PHOTOGRAPHER PROJECT: Teaching Teens under Holiday Lights by Lynda Richardson

Students pose for me before we start shooting in the garden.

Students pose for me before we start shooting in the garden.

Teaching teenagers is both challenging and incredibly fulfilling. Challenging because you are competing against their unformed brains, their increased awareness, and the distraction of the opposite sex as well as today’s “must have” electronic devices. If teens aren’t fully engaged in what you are teaching, you can forget about it. I had worked with only adults for the past 30-plus years, so when I started working with teenagers four years ago, I had a lot to learn about teaching. (More on the fulfilling part later.)

One of my favorite workshops to give is photographing the winter holiday lights display at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond, Virginia. What seems like millions of lights are hung over the entire garden, and each year carries a different theme. What I love about this workshop is that you can throw caution to the wind and just have fun working with color and long exposures to create wild and exciting images that are always a surprise. There is a lot of laughing and sharing, and teenagers and adults alike enjoy the heck out of it.

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NANPA College Scholarship Program

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

NANPA College Scholarship Program

Text By Don Carter and Photos by Mark Larson

You may not know that NANPA has a college scholarship program where we pay expenses for 12 college students to come to the Summit where they network, learn, have their portfolios reviewed, and create a conservation project for a client. The NANPA college committee finds a client who would like the students’ help in creating a multimedia presentation about some type of conservation effort. This year, the students will be working with the San Diego Fish and Wildlife Services, documenting their restoration work along the San Diego Bay. The students will take images, shoot video and conduct interviews in the process of creating the multimedia presentation that will be used by FWS to introduce their conservation efforts to the local community. The presentation will also be shown prior to the keynote address on Saturday evening of the summit.

The students arrive on Monday, prior to the summit to start their planning and create their shooting schedule. They will work with the San Diego FWS personnel to document the ongoing projects. Canon supports the NANPA scholars by providing the equipment for the students to use during the week; they will be providing the new 7D Mk IIs and 1Dx cameras and lenses from 800 mm to 17 mm tilt shift.

This year’s group has seven graduate students and five undergraduates; six biology majors, most of the others are science majors (ecology, wildlife management, etc.), and one photography major. Ten come from all over the US and two students will be coming from Canada.

If you are attending the NANPA Summit in February, please say hello and introduce yourself to the scholars!

To learn more about the program, please visit: http://www.nanpa.org/students/app_process_co.php

If you’d like to support this program, please consider donating to the NANPA Foundation, a 501(c)-3 non-profit organization. All donations are tax-deductible.

 

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

© Mark Larson

 

Finding Community in NANPA by Mark Kreider

Photo by Mark Kreider

Photo by Mark Kreider

Text and Images by Mark Kreider

I have been a NANPA member for a year and a half. Even in that short time, NANPA and its supportive community have influenced me in many meaningful ways. Life seems to be full of wonderful flukes, and my introduction to NANPA was one such instance. One morning in November of 2012, when I was a high school senior, I received word from a fellow photographer of a great photographic opportunity that existed for high school students. Though just three days away from the deadline of NANPA’s High School Scholarship Program application, I immediately jumped at the opportunity. I quite honestly remember thinking it looked too good to be true – a chance to spend a week in the field and at the NANPA Annual Summit, all the while learning and being inspired. I wondered to myself a little incredulously, How could I not have heard of NANPA before? It looks awesome! Continue reading

Low Light Visions by Nevada Wier

© Nevada Wier 2014. Kerala, India: Fire dancer, Theyyam Festival. Canon 5DMarkIII, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8, 1/125sec at f/3.5, ISO 1600 Shutter Priority. Evaluative Metering. Daylight White Balance. Flash not fired.

© Nevada Wier 2014.
Kerala, India: Fire dancer, Theyyam Festival.
Canon 5DMarkIII, Canon 16-35mm f/2.8, 1/125sec at f/3.5, ISO 1600
Shutter Priority. Evaluative Metering. Daylight White Balance. Flash not fired.

 

Nevada is one of the featured keynote speakers at the 2015 NANPA Summit taking place in San Diego, California from February 19th – 22nd. To learn more about the Summit and to register for this exciting and inspirational event, please visit  www.naturephotographysummit.com

 

Images and Story by Nevada Wier

Photographing in low light is particularly challenging, but immensely satisfying — if you can overcome the difficulties. However, it is these kinds of situations that stimulate me as a photographer. I know that it is these times when it is more possible to create what I call a “snowflake photo”: one that no one else has in his or her portfolio. So I seek out the difficult light and perspectives. Of course, that also means that the chance of failure is high; I have to work extra hard in these situations. I am on alert, paying attention, anticipating the action and seeking out whatever light is available.

One is definitely constrained by the quality of their equipment. Sorry, an iPhone is not going to be the camera of choice for photographing at night or inside a hut lit by a candle – unless you are going for an abstract with high noise. Many digital camera sensors are not able to produce a relatively noise-free image at an extremely high ISO. Unless you have a top-of-the-line camera that can handle 1600 ISO or more, the highest exploitable ISO for most cameras ranges between 400–1600 ISO. Another limiting factor is the lens. If you are using a zoom lens that has a minimum aperture of f/4.5, it is going to be problematic. Not only will you not have a fast enough shutter speed, the lens will not be able to quickly and accurately focus in dim light. And, it is critical to pay attention to the focusing. During the day in strong light focusing quickly is easy and accurate; it only takes a quick press of the focus button to be accurate (I use the back * button on my Canon for focusing and to set a specific focal point). In low light it is important to squeeze the focus button until you see the focus alert signal in the viewfinder. Sometimes I have to use manual assist. Occasionally I need to shine a flashlight on my subject so I can focus.

Sometimes I use flash but not for a primary source of light, rather to pop color or stop the action with a slow shutter speed. A flash is always a secondary source of light. I usually go to the highest ISO that I am comfortable using and on my Canon 5D MarkIII I rarely go above 1600 ISO; if I can I much prefer to stay at 800 ISO or lower. I photograph primarily on Shutter Priority, but in low light I sometimes switch to Aperture Priority when I want to stay at a wide-open aperture. However, I do like slow shutter speeds (and I’m not afraid to hand-hold at ½ sec. or slower) in combination with flash, either for panning or having a flash stop the action within a blur, so there is sharpness within a sense of motion. I carry a number of different gels for my flash so the flash outputs blends seamlessly with the ambient light. I usually keep my white balance on Daylight unless there is an abundance of red, and then I use Auto (red is a difficult color to desaturate, it tends towards purple).

I make sure my exposure is absolutely perfect; better too light than too dark. I constantly check my histogram. At a high ISO you do not want to have to lighten your image in post processing and expose ugly noise. Honestly, I rarely use a tripod. I don’t like to walk around with them. The photographs I’m showing you on this blog are all hand-held. In fast moving situations it is difficult to use a tripod, and in crowds – forget about it! Knowing how to use flash appropriately is a big key to success.

© Nevada Wier 2014. Barranquilla, Colombia: Carnival. Canon 5DMarkIII, Canon 24 f/1.4, 1/50sec at f/3.2, ISO 1600. Shutter Priority. Evaluative Metering. Daylight White Balance. Flash Fired.

© Nevada Wier 2014. Barranquilla, Colombia: Carnival.
Canon 5DMarkIII, Canon 24 f/1.4, 1/50sec at f/3.2, ISO 1600.
Shutter Priority. Evaluative Metering. Daylight White Balance. Flash Fired.

I mentioned earlier that it is important to anticipate so that one can be in the front of a crowd. I am used to “wiggling” myself into a good location. There is a fine line between being assertive and aggressive, but I don’t want to end up in the back of a huge crowd.

I expect a lot of failures; in fact I mostly have failures in these kinds of situations, as they are technically and often socially difficult. However, all I need is one great image! I try as many shutter speeds as possible; depth of field is not a critical concern to me at these times. I try slow shutter speeds with or without panning, usually with the flash on. I turn the flash off and work with natural light. I try everything! I always say, “If you don’t try, you don’t get”. And, often what one gets is that magical snowflake image.

© Nevada Wier 2013. Bagan, Myanmar: Ananada Festival. Canon 5DMarkIII, Canon 24 f/1.4, 1/100sec at f/4, ISO 1600. Aperture Priority. Evaluative Metering. Daylight White Balance. Flash Fired.

© Nevada Wier 2013. Bagan, Myanmar: Ananada Festival.
Canon 5DMarkIII, Canon 24 f/1.4, 1/100sec at f/4, ISO 1600.
Aperture Priority. Evaluative Metering. Daylight White Balance. Flash Fired.

 

Nevada Wier is a multiple award-winning photographer specializing in the remote corners of the globe and the cultures that inhabit them. Her journeys have her crisscrossing the world in search of compelling travel experiences and images. To read more about Nevada, view her extraordinary photography and get information about her photo workshops and tours, visit her website at www.nevadawier.com.

 

Flip Nicklin: A Life Among Whales

Flip Nicklin is one of the featured keynote speakers at the 2015 NANPA Summit taking place in San Diego, California from February 19th – 22nd. Flip will also lead of one of the Pre-Summit Boot Camp sessions. To learn more about the Summit and to register for this exciting and inspirational event, please visit  www.naturephotographysummit.com. Early bird registration ends on October 31st! 

 

Humpback whale mother and young; Hawaii. © Flip Nicklin

Humpback whale mother and young; Hawaii. © Flip Nicklin

Forty feet below me she hovers quietly. She’s 45 feet long and 80,000 pounds, and her bulk hides her 15-foot-long calf. The calf makes his way out from under her chin to take a few breaths at the surface. On his way back to his mother, the young humpback spots me near the research boat and gives me a good look. After 35 years of photographing cetaceans professionally, situations like this still bring a smile to my face.

The lives of whales aren’t always serene, though. Only a few days after I spot the mother with her calf, our research team finds a dozen male humpbacks fighting over a female. The battle is brutal; many of the whales have open bloody scrapes on the tops of their bodies. Despite whales’ occasional reputation as “gentle giants,” I would never use the word “gentle” to describe these violent, occasionally fatal encounters in the winter breeding grounds off the coast of Hawaii. Continue reading