A Fed Fox is a Dead Fox: The Negative Impacts of Feeding Wildlife for Photographs

A habituated red fox (Vulpes vulpes) begs for food from cars, a result of being fed in the past by other people. This type of behavior is dangerous for both the fox and the people. The fox has a much higher risk of being hit by a car while trying to stay close to the road for handouts. It can also lose fear of humans and begin approaching people who may, as a result, perceive the animal as aggressive. © Jennifer Leigh Warner
A habituated red fox (Vulpes vulpes) begs for food from cars, a result of being fed in the past by other people. This type of behavior is dangerous for both the fox and the people. The fox has a much higher risk of being hit by a car while trying to stay close to the road for handouts. It can also lose fear of humans and begin approaching people who may, as a result, perceive the animal as aggressive. © Jennifer Leigh Warner

Story & photo by Jennifer Leigh Warner, NANPA Ethics Committee Chair

As I drive down the Colorado mountain road searching for wildlife, I spot a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) foraging off the shoulder of the road. I pull off to see if I can get a picture before it darts back into the woods, but as soon as I open my car door, I realize something is very wrong. The normally shy fox is approaching my vehicle.

Continue reading

Truth In Captioning – An Interview with Melissa Groo and Don Carter

Photographs by Melissa Groo

Interview by David C. Lester

 

A Great Horned Owl in Fort Myers, Florida. © Melissa Groo

Although little introduction is needed, Don Carter is the president of NANPA, and Melissa Groo, in addition to being a world-renowned wildlife photographer, is chair of NANPA’s Ethics Committee.  Over the past several years, significant ethical considerations around nature photography have arisen, along with the need to honestly and accurately caption the details of images.

After several years of work, NANPA has developed a new “Truth in Captioning” statement that addresses these and other issues.  I recently sat down with Don and Melissa to talk about ethical considerations in wildlife photography, as well as the work done on this document.

Continue reading