Nikon AF-S 600mm f/4E FL ED VR Lens Field Review

Story and Photography by Aaron Baggenstos

I was recently given the opportunity to field test the new Nikon AF-S 600mm f/4E FL ED VR Lens in Alaska, one of my favorite places for wildlife photography and a place where I lead several photography tours each year.

I am extremely impressed with this lens. I’ve demonstrated a few of my favorite new features in the video review below including images, video, and time-lapse. Thank you for watching and I hope you enjoy this review.


About Aaron Baggenstos:

Website: www.AaronsTours.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AaronsPhotoTours
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/NaturePhotoTutorials

Aaron Baggenstos is an Award-winning professional wildlife photographer from Seattle, Washington. Aaron specializes in leading photography tours and workshops in Alaska, Yellowstone, and the Pacific Northwest including Canada.

His photographs have been recognized by National Geographic, Nature’s Best, and the Audubon Society. Most recently, thirteen of his images were chosen for the final round in the prestigious 2015 BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

Aaron’s new limited edition coffee table book Pacific Northwest Wildlife is available at retailers ranging from Barnes & Noble to Costco and on Amazon.com. His two previous books Wildlife of Juanita Bay and Wildlife of Lake Washington were instant regional bestsellers and all display Aaron’s awe-inspiring wildlife images.

In the Fall of 2011 Aaron co-hosted two episodes of the hit PBS television Series “Wild Photo Adventures” with Doug Gardner which aired internationally on PBS.

Along with guiding tours and instructing photography workshops over 100 days a year, Aaron also enjoys public speaking and presenting slideshows. To date he has spoken at multiple Audubon chapters and birding groups, National Wildlife Refuges, book stores, and other local interest groups.

Through his work Aaron hopes to inspire others to photograph, enjoy, and take action to protect, local and worldwide ecosystems.

 

 

FIELD TECHNIQUE: Let’s Be Careful Out There Story and photographs by F. M. Kearney

A shutterbug is washed out to sea by a sudden wave, while precariously perched on a precipice during a storm. Another is mauled by a grizzly after snapping a closeup of its cub. We’ve all heard stories like these of photographers putting themselves in harm’s way just to get a shot. I, however, choose not to go out like that—opting instead to place my equipment in the line of fire. Of course, I don’t want to lose that either, but it is better than the alternative. Continue reading

NATURE’S VIEW: Whatchyamacallits and thingamajigs (Part One) Story and photographs by Jim Clark

Sunrise at Black Duck Pool, Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, Virginia. © Jim Clark

Sunrise at Black Duck Pool, Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, Virginia. © Jim Clark

It’s that time of the year when nature photographers are either embarking on a summer season filled with photo adventures, or they are making the final preparations to do so. They have their tripods, lenses and cameras all cleaned, inspected and primed, ready to go into action. Watch out nature, here we come!

Often, we forget to bring along the little things—the whatchyamacallits and thingamajigs—that can save us from those minor and major inconveniences we encounter in the field. During my workshops, I have a show-and-tell session to disclose to my students some of the lesser known items I keep in my camera bag or vest—very handy and inexpensive stuff that can make a difference in having a good photo shoot or a bad one.

Here are just a few items you might consider adding to your photographic toolbox:

Portable Powerbank Charger: Can’t get around it, everyone has in their possession a cellphone and/or a tablet these days. They are indispensable and can certainly have apps that help us in our quest for photographic perfection. Of course, the issue is power. To maintain a full charge while in the field, I keep a portable powerbank charger with me. These units are compact and designed for easy storage. The ones I use even have a handy built-in flashlight. Just remember to charge the charger before you go into the field.

Continue reading

PHOTOGRAPHER PROJECT – Dark Skies of West Texas, Story and photographs by Kathy Adams Clark

Satellite photo of United States at night.

Satellite photo of United States at night.

If you look at a satellite photo taken at night of the United States, you’ll see a recognizable shape. The coastlines are outlined in light. Major cities are clearly defined. Yet, out in far West Texas, there is a dark area void of major manmade lighting.

This huge dark area is being preserved thanks to a major dark sky preservation movement by local entities.

Continue reading

NATURE’S VIEW – Embracing Out-of-focus Photography, Story and photographs by Jim Clark

I tend to get stuck in my ways for photographing landscapes: sharp and focused. But I’ve started experimenting with another technique that I refer to as ambient light painting.

Ambient light painting may not be what you think. It is not using artificial light sources at night to paint light on a tree, old barn or other subject. Instead, ambient light painting uses both natural light and slow camera movements to create abstract compositions. The results can be something resembling a Monet painting.

When I discovered how much my students embraced this technique, I decided to include it in my workshop resources to help them develop their own vision of nature. Turns out, ambient light painting is fun for them, and that fits right in with my goal to get folks to love nature through their photography.

Autumn Forest, Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge, West Virginia. © Jim Clark

Autumn Forest, Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge, West Virginia. © Jim Clark

Continue reading

FIELD TECHNIQUES: When Autumn Falls

by F.M. Kearney

FF-434I often look at autumn as nature’s version of information overload. With fall colors exploding all over the place, it’s sometimes hard to know exactly where to point the camera. Trying to capture everything in one frame often results in not capturing anything at its best advantage.

I’ve learned to use a variety of simple techniques to help make sense out of this visual potpourri. One way is to extract a subject out of its environment in order to help it stand out. A zoom lens is usually the best lens of choice to perform a “visual extraction.” Continue reading

FIELD TECHNIQUES: A Tulip in the Sun


by F.M. Kearney

The weather forecast called for clouds in the morning, followed by sunny skies in the afternoon. I had spent the morning shooting a series of tulip photos in the New York Botanical Garden. I was using a double exposure, soft-focus technique giving them a certain romantic quality that was further enhanced by the subdued light. But I had to work fast. The cloud cover was getting thinner by the minute—soon to let forth the full, harsh light of the sun.

TU-235_edited-1

Of all the days for the weather report to be completely accurate! Continue reading