Autumn Colors in the Adirondacks with Tom Dwyer

People travel from all over the country (indeed all over the world) to enjoy the colorful Adirondack Mountains in full autumn regalia. This workshop will offer easy access to mountain trails, magnificent waterfalls, wilderness rivers and streams, placid lakes, and awesome sunsets & sunrises, all painted with the brilliant colors of autumn.

We’ll focus not only our lenses but our thinking, our vision, our senses and our feelings on the creation of artful images. We won’t “take pictures” or “capture photos”. Rather, we will seek a better understanding of “creating” images “about” our subjects as opposed to “of” them. Participants should expect our days to be long and intense, yet filled with opportunities for exploring, and learning both in the classroom and in the field. Often, the camaraderie of our mutual interest will blossom into new friendships. Ultimately, you will go home having grown in your capabilities as a photographer and with an even stronger desire to pursue the artfulness of your craft.

Quiet Waters of the Adirondacks with Tom Dwyer

Most of us cannot resist taking pictures of beautiful scenes that include water . . . rivers, streams, lakes and waterfalls. What’s more, who doesn’t like spending an August day on the shores of mountain lakes or ponds? And, there’s nowhere better to do that than in the Adirondack Mountains of New York’s Adirondack State Park. In this incredible state park that is larger than the five largest national parks combined, we’ll relax and appreciate the quiet waters in search of peaceful images.

We can count on capturing everything from colorful reflections to cool, moody mountain hideaways . . . from misty lakeside sunrises to graceful Common Loons. From imposing mountain vistas to artful abstracts. We’ll enjoy composing subjects just beneath the water’s surface, discover how to handle high contrast in water scenes and why cloudy days are great for streams, lakes and ponds. We’ll focus not only our lenses but our thinking, our vision, our senses and our feelings on the creation of artful images. For more information visit: https://www.tomdwyerphotography.com/index.php/tour-workshop-schedule/quiet-waters-of-the-adirondacks-2018.

Vision and Craftsmanship by Ron Rosenstock

by Ron Rosenstock

 

“There are no rules for Technique, only solutions. Today’s Darkrooms may soon be replaced with electronic consoles. Yet after thirty years, Steiglitz’s advice to me remains constant: ‘The only thing that matters is the finished photograph.’ “

Arnold Newman, 1965

 

As a teacher of photography, I often quote Arnold Newman because he is speaking about the essence of creating a meaningful photograph.

My background is in the traditional, large-format, black and white school of photography of Edward Weston in the 1920s, and later of Ansel Adams. I worked with a camera similar to that used by Weston and Adams, an 8”x10” view camera, so called so because the film was 8×10 inches. My camera, ten film holders, and tripod together weighed 40 pounds. Cumbersome equipment, but that was just the way it was if you wanted to make high quality images. Back in the 60’s and 70’s it was called fine art photography.

Many years have passed but the basic principals are the same. In the dark room we could crop the image, increase or decrease exposure, increase or decrease contrast, burn and dodge areas to lighten or darken those areas selectively. We can do all this and more now with more ease than ever before. Continue reading