Crystal Coast in Winter with Jamie Konarski Davidson

In the winter, the Crystal Coast of North Carolina is one of the few places where you can shoot sunrise and sunset over the ocean, and you’ll be there for it. Based in Emerald Isle, NC, oceanfront, we’ll photograph the coastal treasures of winter. The coast is rich with natural and nautical history – live oaks, salt marshes and tidal creeks, seaports, shrimp boats and other coastal and cultural subjects that make this area unique. During this workshop you’ll experience these and other amazing sights. Learn techniques for capturing scenes at the edges of the day, long exposures, capturing a sense of place and more.

Join Jamie Konarski Davidson and Nicole Deen and immerse yourself in a weekend of photography with oceanfront rooms, plenty of hands-on instruction in the field and classroom time to finetune what you’ve captured. Learn practical shooting techniques and creative approaches to simple scenes and how to work with the light you have. Winter is the quieter season. The Crystal Coast awaits. Visit www.newlifephotos.com to learn more.

Vision and Craftsmanship by Ron Rosenstock

by Ron Rosenstock

 

“There are no rules for Technique, only solutions. Today’s Darkrooms may soon be replaced with electronic consoles. Yet after thirty years, Steiglitz’s advice to me remains constant: ‘The only thing that matters is the finished photograph.’ “

Arnold Newman, 1965

 

As a teacher of photography, I often quote Arnold Newman because he is speaking about the essence of creating a meaningful photograph.

My background is in the traditional, large-format, black and white school of photography of Edward Weston in the 1920s, and later of Ansel Adams. I worked with a camera similar to that used by Weston and Adams, an 8”x10” view camera, so called so because the film was 8×10 inches. My camera, ten film holders, and tripod together weighed 40 pounds. Cumbersome equipment, but that was just the way it was if you wanted to make high quality images. Back in the 60’s and 70’s it was called fine art photography.

Many years have passed but the basic principals are the same. In the dark room we could crop the image, increase or decrease exposure, increase or decrease contrast, burn and dodge areas to lighten or darken those areas selectively. We can do all this and more now with more ease than ever before. Continue reading