Necessary but not Sufficient: The Great American Outdoors Act

Photo of a brilliant sunset from atop Clingman's Dome in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the most visited National Park in the country with a deferred maintenance backlog of $235 million.
Brilliant sunset from atop Clingman’s Dome in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the most visited National Park in the country with a deferred maintenance backlog of $235 million.

By Jerry Ginsberg

Back in August the Great American Outdoors Act was signed into law. Among its provisions, it provides funding of approximately $1.3 billion per year for five years to address long-delayed maintenance needs of the National Park Service. Clearly, this is a good thing and a reason to rejoice.

That said, it isn’t a perfect bill.

Continue reading

The Great American Outdoors Act Becomes Law

President Donald J. Trump signs H.R. 1957- The Great American Outdoors Act Tuesday, August 4, 2020, in the East Room of the White House. (Official White House Photo by Tia Dufour) Public Domain
President Donald J. Trump signs H.R. 1957- The Great American Outdoors Act Tuesday, August 4, 2020, in the East Room of the White House. (Official White House Photo by Tia Dufour) Public Domain

On August 4th, the president signed into law the Great American Outdoors Act. At a time when not many people agree on anything the act, with strong bipartisan support, passed the Senate 73 to 25 and the House 310 to 107.

Continue reading

Great American Outdoors Act Clears Senate

The Yosemite Valley from the Mariposa Trail by Carleton Watkins. Watkins’ photos were instrumental in getting Congress to pass the Yosemite Grant in 1864, preserving the valley and leading to the creation of national parks. Public domain.

Last week the United States Senate passed the Great American Outdoors Act by a strongly bipartisan vote of 73 to 25.  The bill provides billions of dollars in funding for parks, trails and public lands, including funding for some of the maintenance backlog in national parks and wildlife refuges, as well as permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF).  For nature photographers who photograph or lead tours in parks, refuges and public lands, this is good news.

Continue reading