National Parks in Appalachia

The Temple of Karnak is one of the more angular of the many limestone formations deep inside Mammoth Cave, Mammoth Cave National Park, KY.
The Temple of Karnak is one of the more angular of the many limestone formations deep inside Mammoth Cave, Mammoth Cave National Park, KY.

Story & photos by Jerry Ginsberg

The national park movement originally grew out of the 19th century recognition that it was important to protect the spectacular natural wonders of the American west. It took a few more decades for the eastern part of our country to gain some respect for its own scenic gems. Eventually, however, many national parks were established east of the Mississippi and now play host to scores of millions of visitors annually. Three of these, Mammoth Cave, Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains, form a line through the Appalachians and were created at the urging of FDR.

Continue reading

Mammoth Cave National Park

Story and photography by Jerry Ginsberg

 

Unique limestone formations deep within an open area of Mammoth Cave. © Jerry Ginsberg

 

To my knowledge, there are just five cave systems within our 59 national parks, at least those that are open to the public. While other caverns are found in some national monuments, let’s stick to these big 5 for now.

Continue reading