How to Chase and Shoot the Aurora

Aurora borealis over Turnagain Arm in Chugach National Forest, Alaska, in mid-March.

Aurora borealis over Turnagain Arm in Chugach National Forest, Alaska, in mid-March.

From the Editor:  Award-winning landscape and nature photographer Carl Johnson has been living in Alaska for almost 20 years and is an expert on shooting auroras.  On Friday, August 17th, at 2 PM EDT, he will present a NANPA Webinar, “Chasing & Photographing the Aurora Borealis. This webinar covers the science behind the aurora, the tools available to predict and plan for it (including websites and apps that provide real-time and forecasting information), tips on when and where to photograph it, and what gear and techniques to use. For more information or to sign up, click here.

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From the Archives – On Screwing Up by Gary Crabbe

From the Editor:  As pointed out in Gary Crabbe’s post on making mistakes, this is something that we all do.  With the myriad of settings available on today’s sophisticated digital cameras, it’s easier than ever.  This post appeared four years ago, and the lesson is as relevant today as it was then.  DL

Story and Photograph by Gary Crabbe

Morning light on sandstone cliffs reflected in the Colorado River at Horseshoe Bend, near Pag, Arizona

Morning light on sandstone cliffs reflected in the Colorado River at Horseshoe Bend, near Page, Arizona. © Gary Crabbe/Enlightened Images

Even professionals screw up every now and again. We may not brag about it in public, but rest assured, we make mistakes just like everyone else.

The photo above may not look like a total screw-up, but it is. It’s a multi-row, nearly 40-frame panoramic image shot with my Nikon D800. Continue reading

President’s Letter – March 2018

NANPA President Don Carter

Message from Don Carter, NANPA President

 

As this winter starts to fade I’m thinking about spring photography and, for me, it’s getting out of the deserts of Arizona and into the mountains of Wyoming. I’m remembering last May’s Regional Event in Yellowstone where I was able to photograph seven different bears in a single day. This year I’m going to return with a stop in Jackson for NANPA’s Nature Photography Celebration, May 20 – 22.

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Five great tips Galen Rowell taught me

Story and photographs by Gary Crabbe

Editor’s note: On October 31 the photo gallery founded by Galen Rowell and lovingly managed by his wife Barbara Rowell called Mountain Light will close. The Rowells died 15 years ago in a plane crash near their hometown of Bishop, California, while returning from a photography workshop in Alaska. Author Gary Crabbe’s first real job was as a manager of Rowell’s 400,000-photo library for nine years. Now a successful photographer living near San Francisco, he offers five things he learned from Rowell that helped boost his career from amateur to professional.

It was 15 years ago last August that internationally renowned photographer Galen Rowell and his wife, Barbara, perished in a plane crash near their hometown in Bishop, California. They were on the very last leg of a long return voyage home after teaching a workshop in the Arctic. In a moment, we lost one of the best-known photographers who helped pioneer the genres of climbing and adventure travel photography and helped to elevate the genre of landscape photography with what he called the “dynamic landscape.” Continue reading

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Story and photography by Jerry Ginsberg

As I have mentioned a time or two, Grand Staircase-Escalante in central Utah is my favorite national monument. This is the case primarily for one reason; variety. This sprawling tract covers close to two million acres, almost as big as immense Yellowstone National Park.  The monument was established in 1996 with the former Escalante Wilderness as its core, primarily as a means of protecting this chunk of central Utah from the prospective strip mining of its extensive coal deposits. At the same time, whether by accident or design, it has the simultaneous effect of protecting some of the most spectacular rock formations in all of the Southwest. Lucky us!

There are several wonderful areas within the boundaries of “The Escalante” so it can be a challenge to decide where to begin. Whether or not you have researched the monument online in advance of any trip here, it’s a good idea to make an initial stop at one of the BLM / multi-agency ranger stations serving the Escalante. They are located in the towns of Kanab and Escalante, Utah. Stopping to speak with a ranger can help to put some of the photo opportunities here in some degree of logical order.

In brief and in no particular order, the prime ‘Do Not Miss’ areas here are:

Curvy red sandstone in Devil’s Garden, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, Utah. © Jerry Ginsberg

Devil’s Garden A tightly packed and surreal playground filed with outrageously eroded hoodoos and arches. My wife, at a willowy 5’9″ is accustomed to her high vantage point. Even in light of that, she is quite struck to be “feeling like Alice in Wonderland” among these remarkable geologic forms. Continue reading

NANPA Weekly Wow: May 1-7

Sealed With A Kiss - Sea Lions, La Jolla Cove, CA © Jennifer Leigh Warner

Sealed With A Kiss – Sea Lions, La Jolla Cove, CA © Jennifer Leigh Warner

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2017 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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NANPA Weekly Wow: April 24-30

© Amy Marques - "Above the Sea Diorama, Misc FL East Coast Beaches"

© Amy Marques – “Above the Sea Diorama, Misc FL East Coast Beaches”

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2017 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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