Fall in The Smoky Mountains with Tom Croce

Join us in the beautiful Great Smoky Mountains for three days of photographing cascades along Tremont, and Elkmont Areas, sunrises and subsets along New Found Gap Road, Clingmans Dome, and the Foothills Parkway

And the winners are…

A bald eagle in small community burning trash pit, Adak, Aleutian Islands, Alaska--Showcase 2017 Birds Best of Show

A bald eagle in small community burning trash pit, Adak, Aleutian Islands, Alaska–Showcase 2017
Best of Show- Birds © Mark Kelley

NANPA is pleased to announce the winners of the 2017 NANPA Showcase Competition. Continue reading

Showcase Images

 

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Each week www.nanpa.org highlights images from the top 100 submissions of the NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by: Peter Ismert, Scott Reither, Robert Strickland, David Francis, Marco Crupi, Bob Oswald, Scott Smorra.

 

Showcase Images

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Each week www.nanpa.org highlights images from the top 100 submissions of the NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by: Eric Bowles, Betty Sederquist, Hector Astorga, Lance Warley, Ken Archer, Diana Rebman, Douglas James.

 

THE POWER OF MONOCHROME by Jack Graham

Canyonlands National Park, Utah.

Canyonlands National Park, Utah.

When reading this short essay, remember I have no plans to abandon color photography. My feelings are that both mediums have their place. Some images are better represented in color and others in monochrome. The principles of photography carry over to both methods. The only difference is in certain images, the lack of color and the power of monochrome can stand out when applied correctly. I also prefer to use the term monochrome rather than black and white. When viewing a black and white image, we are really looking at shades of gray, not just black and white. Continue reading

A Tale of Two Winters by Kathy Lichtendahl

Mystic Falls © Kathy Lichtendahl

Mystic Falls © Kathy Lichtendahl

Although Yellowstone National Park is a photographer’s paradise any time of year, it is truly magical in the winter months. But a visit to the Park in the cold season requires a certain amount of research and planning. Many of the roads close down completely in late October and re-open to supervised over-snow travel in mid-December, remaining open until the end of February before closing once again for spring plowing. One exception is the road between Mammoth Hot Springs and Cooke City, Montana, through the well-known Lamar Valley. The road is Cooke City’s only automobile access to the outside world in winter and so it is kept open year round. Continue reading

HAVASUPAI REBORN, by Kerrick James

Havasu Falls and Rainbow

Havasu Falls and Rainbow

The landscape of the Colorado Plateau is ephemeral, a changeling, although to beings with short life spans this land seems immutable, a constant. But in canyon country stunning changes can occur in a single afternoon, altering the course of a stream, stranding a waterfall, even creating a new unheralded cascade. Thus, it has always been in Havasupai, named for the people of the blue-green water.

Havasupai, the mythic side canyon hidden well to the west of the South Rim summer mayhem and adjoining Grand Canyon National Park, has always been near the top of my favorite locations to photograph. I’ve been lucky to shoot this desert Shangri-la a dozen times since the late 70’s, with a progression of cameras from 4×5 to 67 Pentax to a variety of digital formats. For years I blithely assumed that the interwoven terraces of travertine below each of the three great waterfalls, Havasu, Navajo, and Mooney, would always be there to compose as one of the most artistic foregrounds imaginable. Continue reading