VOLUNTEER: Lee Hoy

© Lee Hoy took this self-portrait at about 3:30 a.m., Santa Elena Canyon, Big Bend National Park.

© Lee Hoy took this self-portrait at about 3:30 a.m., Santa Elena Canyon, Big Bend National Park.

Lee Hoy says his life’s journey has been full of adventure and change, but one thing has never wavered and that is his passion and love for wildlife and nature. “There is nothing greater than standing under the Milky Way in Big Bend National Park,” he says, “or watching sharp-tailed grouse on the lek in the Badlands.” Hoy’s first photographic subject was a bison at Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge. Hoy became serious about photography in 1989.

Hoy has a B.A. in Geography and a M.S. in Regional City & Planning from the University of Oklahoma; as well as a Master of Divinity with Biblical Languages from Southwestern Seminary, Texas. He has been a transportation planner in Rapid City, South Dakota, and a pastor for 13 years. In addition to being a serious photographer since 1989, Hoy currently works as supervisor of the Judge Roy Bean Visitor Center in Langtry, Texas, about 60 miles from his residence in Sanderson. Continue reading

When Color Doesn’t Cut It by Lee Hoy

American Bison by Lee Hoy

American Bison by Lee Hoy

Text and Images by Lee Hoy

As a wildlife and landscape photographer, I am constantly amazed at the plethora of colors that even a tiny damselfly can exhibit. It is capturing the palette of nature’s colors that often lures us out of bed early each morning, but what do we do when color just doesn’t cut it? What about when we are trying to communicate texture, form, grandeur, or movement and color becomes a distraction?

As a young boy, my parents would take me to the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma where I was captivated by a giant woolly beast that embodied the American west. I have photographed the American bison on many occasions and often find color images to be disappointing. It was only after I bought Silver Effex Pro 2.0 and began to learn its capabilities that I realized black-and-white images were the ticket to revealing to others what drew me to bison in the first place. The deep crevices in the shaggy coat, the splintering of the tips of the horns, the soulfulness of the eyes, and the jagged wrinkles in their hindquarters were expertly represented through black-and-white. Continue reading