Meet the Judges of the NANPA Showcase Photo Competition

NANPA Showcase CompetitionIt’s time to think about which images you’ll enter in NANPA’s 2019 Showcase Competition.  The window for entries opened August 1st and closes on September 17th at 11 PM Eastern Time. There are some great prize packages and plenty of opportunities for recognition.

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Truth In Captioning – An Interview with Melissa Groo and Don Carter

Photographs by Melissa Groo

Interview by David C. Lester

 

A Great Horned Owl in Fort Myers, Florida. © Melissa Groo

Although little introduction is needed, Don Carter is the president of NANPA, and Melissa Groo, in addition to being a world-renowned wildlife photographer, is chair of NANPA’s Ethics Committee.  Over the past several years, significant ethical considerations around nature photography have arisen, along with the need to honestly and accurately caption the details of images.

After several years of work, NANPA has developed a new “Truth in Captioning” statement that addresses these and other issues.  I recently sat down with Don and Melissa to talk about ethical considerations in wildlife photography, as well as the work done on this document.

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2017 NANPA Award Winners

We are pleased to formally announce the 2017 NANPA Award Winners. NANPA Awards fit two broad categories: recognition and service. The NANPA Awards Committee accepts nominations, selects and evaluates candidates for each award and makes recommendations to the NANPA Board of Directors. The 2017 NANPA Awards will be presented at the 2017 Nature Photography Summit in Jacksonville, FL, March 2-4. Continue reading

Photographing a Red Fox Family

Basic Metadata

Story and Photographs by Melissa Groo

This past spring, in upstate New York, I had the opportunity to photograph a family of wild Red Foxes at their den. The den was located under a shed in a suburban backyard, and the homeowners granted me permission to set up my pop-up blind in their yard, about 50 yards from the shed. Though they knew full well that I was in the blind, this fox family seemed pretty accustomed to human presence, and they went about their lives without appearing disturbed by me. This is of paramount importance to me when I photograph a wild animal, as I seek to capture behavior that’s as natural as possible, and I never want to disturb or endanger my subjects.

Over the course of about a month, I traveled to my set up whenever I had a free moment, spending hours in my blind; I always left wishing I could stay longer. I was fascinated by the relationship dynamics among the family members, and enthralled by the playfulness of the kits. I counted 6 kits at first, guessing they were roughly 2 months old. I was struck by how much they acted like puppies, which is no surprise, as foxes are members of the Canidae family. The kits roughhoused constantly, rolling and tumbling over each other. As time went on, their playfulness had an edge of ferocity, and their interactions became more adversarial. They honed their hunting skills by stalking one another around the tree trunks and shed corners, and familiarized themselves with prey by proudly carrying around the bodies of star-nosed moles and squirrels that their parents had brought back for them.

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