Costa Rica – Osa Peninsula with Steve Gettle and Nicole Sudduth

Traveling to Osa Peninsula is an adventure into the heart of wildlife abundance. Osa is the gem of Costa Rica. This area hosts the largest population of Scarlet Macaws in the country, all four species of monkeys, both species of sloths, Costa Rica’s largest remaining population of jaguars and tapirs, over 100 species of reptiles and a huge diversity of frogs. The colors and sounds will excite and amaze you as we spend our entire tour in this magical place.

National Geographic named Osa peninsula as one of the most incredibly biologically intense places on earth and we will be in the heart of it. We will begin at a 750-acre forest reserve at a point where the Gulfo Dulce meets the Pacific Ocean. We will then move down the coast until we are literally at the doorstep of Corcovado National Park, the largest lowland rainforest in Central America.

Osa is where the rainforest meets the sea. Explore lush gardens and hiking trails that take us from pristine beaches with tide pools to spring-fed rivers and waterfalls to rich rainforest jungle where monkeys howl. Imagine flocks of macaws, toucans, and parrots, coatis, kinkajous, agoutis, and sloths as daily visitors that we may have the opportunity to photograph.

This is a location where we have the chance to photograph all four species of Costa Rica’s monkeys: Capuchin, Spider, Mantled Howler, and the endangered Squirrel monkey.

More than 460 species of birds call this place home. Bird photographers will enjoy enormous variety of species that range from tropical rainforest birds to raptors to ocean and wetland species. In addition to Scarlet Macaws which the place is known for, we may see Red-capped Manakins, Blue-crowned manakins, Yellow-billed and Turquoise Cotingas, Tinamou, trogons, honeycreepers, Black-mandibled toucans, red-lored parrots, and so many more!

Macro is also fun in this area as we shoot subjects such as Leaf-Cutter Ants, Red-Eyed Tree Frogs and Poison Dart Frogs and other small creatures. Over 10,000 species of colorful and unique insects and over 100 species of reptiles and amphibians are found here.

Japan in Winter with Art Wolfe

Japan in winter is one of the most majestic locations you could ever imagine. A slight dusting of snow turns the regularly bustling streets into a proverbial winter wonderland. The colder temperatures also tend to cut down on the amount of crowds, which makes photographing the iconic sites much more appealing.

We will embark on an eleven-day intensive photography workshop covering the most photographic sites, from buzzing cities to the calm atmospheric landscapes, stretching the length of Japan. First we’ll visit the snow macaques that live in the mountains about two hours west of Tokyo. Here in an isolated steep cut valley with an amazing mountain lodge are three extended families of macaques, numbering around 50. Because they are the most northern primate on earth, they have the longest, luxuriant fur of any primates, particularly in the winter months. They come down from the pine and oak forests and for a couple of hours a day they hang around a natural hot spring. They have been habituated to people visiting them there, so you can photograph from within inches without interrupting their behavior, which is very animated and fun. It is a photographic bonanza.

After visiting the macaques, we will travel to the northern island of Hokkaido. Hokkaido reminds me a bit of Alaska, full of forests of birch, pine and fir with a back drop of beautiful volcanic mountains. There are also large lakes and wild running rivers, and hosts three species of bird wildlife that are extraordinary to photograph. The Japanese Crane has been symbolized in Japanese culture for thousands of years due to its grace and beauty. Giant whooper swans come in the winter months from nesting in Siberia. They have been fed by locals for years, helping them sustain thru the winter, as well as creating an easy and wonderful photographic opportunity for us! And often Steller’s sea eagles will swoop around the same area. They are massive black and white raptors that winter over on the icy shores of Hokkaido.

NANPA Weekly Wow: April 3-9

African elephants drinking , Chobe River, Botswana © Carol Grenier

African elephants drinking , Chobe River, Botswana © Carol Grenier

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2017 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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