Words Matter: Photos and Interview Transcripts Are Key in Conservation Project

Ethiopia, Omo River Valley, village of Tourmi, after Hamar bull-jumping initiation ceremony.  Halewijn Scheuermann, Dutch tour guide, transports ititiate and his friends in his truck back to their homes. Photo by NWNL Director and Lead Photographer Alison M. Jones.
Ethiopia, Omo River Valley, village of Tourmi, after Hamar bull-jumping initiation ceremony. Halewijn Scheuermann, Dutch tour guide, transports initiate and his friends in his truck back to their homes. Photo by NWNL Director and Lead Photographer Alison M. Jones.

Sometimes a really critical piece of a conservation project isn’t the photography, the charismatic megafauna or stunning plants. Sometimes it’s something much more mundane or prosaic, like transcripts.

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Rare Plant Heroes

Herbarium Specimen
Herbarium Specimen

Editor’s Note: Michelle A. Butler received NANPA’s 2015 Janie Moore Greene Grant.  At that time, she was a student completing her Master’s of Fine Arts degree from the Academy of Art University, San Francisco. She was then working on a photo-documentary thesis project to raise awareness about the condition of birds in the Americas. It highlights the habitats needed for nesting, wintering and migration and calls for conservation efforts that citizens can make to help protect these essential components to our ecosystem.

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Documenting the River of Redemption: An update on the Anacostia Project

Sunset over the Anacostia River in Prince George's County, Maryland.
Sunset over the Anacostia River in Prince George’s County, Maryland.

Story & photos by Krista Schlyer

In 2010, as part of the International League of Conservation Photographers’ Chesapeake Bay RAVE (Rapid Assessment Visual Expedition), I found myself on the Anacostia River in Washington DC. The Anacostia is one of the most imperiled watersheds within the Chesapeake Bay watershed, a sprawling eco-region spanning most of the Mid-Atlantic. The Anacostia is also my home watershed, where the water that drains off my house and yard ends up.

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Hidden Rivers

Chub nest
Chub nest.

A film and photography exhibit celebrating the freshwater life of Southern Appalachia

Story and photos by David Herasimtschuk

A true spectacle of biodiversity, freshwater hosts a teeming collage of colors, shapes and behaviors. These flowing waters are essential to life. Yet, as a society dependent upon this vital resource, how often do we look beneath the water’s surface? Over the last ten years, Freshwaters Illustrated has worked to document the vibrancy and wonder of life found in the rivers and streams of Southern Appalachia, North America’s most biologically-rich waters. This unique region harbors the world’s richest temperate fish fauna and is home to the highest diversity of freshwater mussels, snails, crayfish and salamanders on the planet. Highlighting this great variety, Freshwaters Illustrated created its newest feature film, Hidden Rivers, which follows the work of conservation biologists and explorers throughout the region and reveals both the beauty and vulnerability of these ecosystems.

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Summit Challenge Grant for NANPA Foundation

Mary Jane Gibson, Vice President of the NANPA Foundation Board of Trustees announces the results of a challenge grant at the 2019 Nature Photography Summit.

Mary Jane Gibson, Vice President of the NANPA Foundation Board of Trustees announces the results of a challenge grant at the 2019 Nature Photography Summit.

During NANPA’s recent Nature Photography Summit and Trade Show in Las Vegas, one bunch of photographers always seemed to be especially hard at work, energized and excited. These young people were participants in the NANPA Foundation’s Summit College Scholarship Program and their week in Las Vegas was packed with learning, growing, creating, networking and having fun.

Their assignment: develop a story-telling project which would be shown during the Summit.

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From the Executive Director – Susan Day

Susan Day. Photo by David Small

Photo by David Small

2018 NANPA Snapshot

The end of a year signals a time for reflection of the past months as well as anticipation of what’s ahead.  As I review 2018 for NANPA, I’m amazed at the variety and number of events and services offered for a relatively small organization.  Everything we do is coordinated by a handful of part-time contractors and around 100 volunteers.

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What Winning NANPA Foundation’s Philip Hyde Grant Means

 

Cullinan Ranch levee breach - The 1500 acre Cullinan Ranch was purchased by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as part of San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge in 1991. It was diked off from tidal action and drained in the 1800’s to grow oat hay. It is now being restored for endangered species and other wildlife.

Cullinan Ranch levee breach – The 1500 acre Cullinan Ranch was purchased by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as part of San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge in 1991. It was diked off from tidal action and drained in the 1800’s to grow oat hay. It is now being restored for endangered species and other wildlife.

Story and photographs by Beth Huning, 2011 Philip Hyde Grant Recipient

As photographers, many of us are good at telling our conservation stories through imagery.  We use our photos to support projects that protect or restore the earth, its ecosystems, and inhabitants. Philip Hyde was a pioneer in using photographs for conservation and I have long admired his achievements. A native Californian, he was passionate about protecting the American West, and his photographs were influential in many conservation campaigns.

From the Editor: Applications for the 2018 Philip Hyde Grant and the 2018 Janie Moore Greene Grant are encouraged and will be accepted through midnight, October 31st. Details are at the end of the article.

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Kelsey Gramza is Awarded the 2017 Janie Moore Greene Grant

African Crane © Kelsey Gramza

Award recognizes those studying photography in higher education

Kelsey Gramza of West Falls, New York has been chosen as the 2017 Janie Moore Greene Grant recipient. She is in her sophomore year at University at Buffalo and is pursuing a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts degree with a concentration in photography. University at Buffalo is in Buffalo, New York.

Gramza’s career goals are to go on to graduate school and become a photography professor at a university. She currently runs a photography club at University at Buffalo.

Gramza shared what has led up to her studying photography which started when she was eight years old and picked up a camera for the first time. Her father commended her on her first photographs and she hasn’t looked back since. In 2013, she was awarded a NANPA High School Scholarship Program scholarship which allowed her to attend NANPA’s 2013 Nature Photography Summit and Trade Show in Jacksonville, Florida. Gramza described that experience as “one of the most inspiring weeks of my life. I learned more from that experience than I ever had about photography and I connected with so many others in my group. To this day, I still keep in contact with and watch those in the program with me grow in their photography.”

Grasshopper peers over the top of a flower. © Kelsey Gramza

The Janie Moore Greene Grant is a $1,000 award given annually by the NANPA Foundation through the generosity of Janie Moore Greene to a student currently enrolled in, or who has been accepted to, an institution of higher education specializing in the study of photography.

Applications for the 2018 award will be accepted beginning in late summer. For more information and updates, visit the NANPA Foundation website.