Big South Fork Spring With Byron Jorjorian

Every bit as magnificent as the Smoky Mountains with far less congestion, Big South Fork National Recreation area in Tennessee is one of the most beautiful and unique areas of the United States both geologically and biologically. It is a land of striking contrasts, with the steep bluffs, waterfalls and stunning gorges so characteristic of the the Cumberland Plateau. There are also natural arches, wildflowers, deep hardwood forests, boulder filled rivers and breathtaking overlooks.

We will spend our time in the field where I will guide you to some of my favorite spots and assist you personally in bringing back the best images that you possibly can. I will help you with all technical aspects of your photography including: Exposure, depth of field, histograms, choosing the correct aperture, maximizing image quality in every situation.

Outer Banks with Margo Taussig Pinkerton

Join our photography workshop on our own wild and pristine North Carolina barrier islands. We will show you special gems along this untamed coastline we love so well. The sunrises and sunsets can be spectacular, the patterns along the seashore and in the marshes inspirational, and the sights and sounds of the wild Atlantic pounding the coast intoxicating. We’ll even visit a beautiful garden where the spring blossoms are stunning. You’ll love photographing here, and you’ll be able to celebrate your passion for photography, hone your seeing and imaging skills, and learn about the magic of light to make wonderful photographs…

With workshops limited to 12 participants (a maximum 6:1 ratio, students to instructors), you can be assured of nearly as much one-one time as you want/need. We also welcome those whom we affectionately call our “Spousal Units,” those spouses and SOs who return so often to our workshops.

More details. Discount to NANPA members.

From the Archives — In Our Yard

Editor’s Note:  While spring 2018 is struggling to make its appearance through much of the United States, we can already look in our backyards and see the early signs that it’s on the way.  Our backyards are always one of the best places to look for flowers, birds, and occasionally, something larger.  This post by Amy Shutt appeared in 2014, and what she describes sounds like the ultimate back, front, and side yards for observing wildlife.

Story and Photography by Amy Shutt

Alstroemeria psittacina 'Parrot Lily'

Alstroemeria psittacina ‘Parrot Lily’ © Amy Shutt

 

We live on 7.5 acres of land in a little town in Louisiana. Although I’ve only been here for a few years, my husband, an ornithologist, has been living here for quite some time. It’s 95% woods. He gardens the area around the house exclusively for hummingbirds and the rest is untouched. Yep, we are the eccentric neighbors with the overgrown yard with signs designating the ditch in the front as a ‘Wildflower Area’ so the city won’t cut or spray.

I see swamp rabbits almost daily. We have deer…and deer ticks. I have heard foxes in the darkness just off the driveway in the woods. We have enjoyed listening to coyotes howling in unison. Barred owls belt out their crazy calls nightly. Prothonotary Warblers nest in boxes we make for them around the house and in the woods.  Point is, it’s pretty cool out here and we share this land with a lot of critters and plants.  Continue reading

NANPA Weekly Wow – 03.26.18

Black and white image of dust bathing elephant throwing dust over head and over the family herd. © Wendy Kaveney

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2018 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

Continue reading

NANPA Weekly Wow – 03.12.18

 

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2018 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

 

Whale shark, Isla Mujeres, Mexico © Rick Beldegreen

Continue reading

Making An Impression

Story and Photographs by F.M. Kearney

If you’re not a winter person, it’s probably been a few months since you’ve taken a single photo. But, you’re in luck. Spring is just around the corner, and it won’t be long before blooms of daffodils, tulips and cherry blossoms begin dotting the landscape. But, instead of settling for the same old photos this year, why not try something a little different?

I recently began experimenting with a program called Topaz Impression. I briefly touched on this program in my article, “The Final Frames,” in the last installment of eNEWS last year. Topaz (topazlabs.com) makes over a dozen programs that can really add a unique flair to your images, but when it comes to nature photography, Impression is probably the most useful. Taking its name from the impressionistic-style of painting that emerged in France in the mid-19th century, this program can transform an ordinary-looking photo into a stunning work of art.

Continue reading