Weekly Wow! Week of September 30, 2019

All of this week’s Weekly Wow! images can be seen in the slideshow on the NANPA homepage at nanpa.org.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: "Sea Urchin , Newton, Massachusetts" © Hope Schreiber.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: “Sea Urchin , Newton, Massachusetts” © Hope Schreiber.

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, September 30, 2019.  To view all of the top 250 photographs from NANPA’s 2019 Showcase competition, see the photo gallery on the NANPA website.  Continue reading

Weekly Wow! Week of September 23, 2019

All of this week’s Weekly Wow! images can be seen in the slideshow on the NANPA homepage at nanpa.org.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: “Warthog Chase, Etosha National Park, Namibia” © Patrick Pevey.

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, September 23, 2019.  To view all of the top 250 photographs from NANPA’s 2019 Showcase competition, see the photo gallery on the NANPA website. 

Continue reading

The NPS Artist-in-Residence Program: Are you interested?

Story & photos by Sue Wolfe

Sunrise at Padre Island National Seashore, 7/7/18.
Sunrise at Padre Island National Seashore, 7/7/18.

Are you a photographer looking for a way to put your photography to good use, take your skills to the next level or get your creative juices flowing?  Then perhaps the National Park Service’s Artist-in-Residence program is for you.

Continue reading

Weekly Wow! Week of September 16, 2019

All of this week’s Weekly Wow! images can be seen in the slideshow on the NANPA homepage at nanpa.org.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: "Red Pine Tree Trunks in Snow Storm, Near Reno, Nevada" © Susan Dykstra.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: “Red Pine Tree Trunks in Snow Storm, Near Reno, Nevada” © Susan Dykstra.

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, September 16, 2019.  To view all of the top 250 photographs from NANPA’s 2019 Showcase competition, see the photo gallery on the NANPA website.  Tonight is the deadline for entering your best shots in this year’s Showcase.  What are you waiting for?  Let’s get shooting!  Your best shot might be your next one.

Continue reading

Weekly Wow! Week of September 9, 2019

All of this week’s Weekly Wow! images can be seen in the slideshow on the NANPA homepage at nanpa.org.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: "Malagasy Child Playing the Avenue of the Baobabs," Morondava, Madagascar © Victor Nemeth.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: “Malagasy Child Playing the Avenue of the Baobabs,” Morondava, Madagascar © Victor Nemeth.

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, September 9, 2019.  To view all of the top 250 photographs from NANPA’s 2019 Showcase competition, see the photo gallery on the NANPA website.  The period for entering your best shots in this year’s Showcase began August 1st  and runs until through September 16th.  What are you waiting for?  Let’s get shooting!  Your best shot might be your next one.

Continue reading

Hidden Rivers

Chub nest
Chub nest.

A film and photography exhibit celebrating the freshwater life of Southern Appalachia

Story and photos by David Herasimtschuk

A true spectacle of biodiversity, freshwater hosts a teeming collage of colors, shapes and behaviors. These flowing waters are essential to life. Yet, as a society dependent upon this vital resource, how often do we look beneath the water’s surface? Over the last ten years, Freshwaters Illustrated has worked to document the vibrancy and wonder of life found in the rivers and streams of Southern Appalachia, North America’s most biologically-rich waters. This unique region harbors the world’s richest temperate fish fauna and is home to the highest diversity of freshwater mussels, snails, crayfish and salamanders on the planet. Highlighting this great variety, Freshwaters Illustrated created its newest feature film, Hidden Rivers, which follows the work of conservation biologists and explorers throughout the region and reveals both the beauty and vulnerability of these ecosystems.

Continue reading

National Parks in Appalachia

The Temple of Karnak is one of the more angular of the many limestone formations deep inside Mammoth Cave, Mammoth Cave National Park, KY.
The Temple of Karnak is one of the more angular of the many limestone formations deep inside Mammoth Cave, Mammoth Cave National Park, KY.

Story & photos by Jerry Ginsberg

The national park movement originally grew out of the 19th century recognition that it was important to protect the spectacular natural wonders of the American west. It took a few more decades for the eastern part of our country to gain some respect for its own scenic gems. Eventually, however, many national parks were established east of the Mississippi and now play host to scores of millions of visitors annually. Three of these, Mammoth Cave, Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains, form a line through the Appalachians and were created at the urging of FDR.

Continue reading

Weekly Wow! Week of September 2, 2019

All of this week’s Weekly Wow! images can be seen in the slideshow on the NANPA homepage at nanpa.org.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: "Looking for Something," Tre Cime di Laveredo, Italy © Peter Nestler.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: “Looking for Something,” Tre Cime di Laveredo, Italy © Peter Nestler.

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, September 2, 2019.  To view all of the top 250 photographs from NANPA’s 2019 Showcase competition, see the photo gallery on the NANPA website.  The period for entering your best shots in this year’s Showcase began August 1st  and runs until through September 16th.  What are you waiting for?  Let’s get shooting!  Your best shot might be your next one.

Continue reading

Weekly Wow! Week of August 26, 2019

All of this week’s Weekly Wow! images can be seen in the slideshow on the NANPA homepage at nanpa.org.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: "Colorful Fall Leaves Along Bishop Creek," Bishop Creek, Inyo County, California © Ian S. Frazier.

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: “Colorful Fall Leaves Along Bishop Creek,” Bishop Creek, Inyo County, California © Ian S. Frazier.

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, August 26, 2019.  To view all of the top 250 photographs from NANPA’s 2019 Showcase competition, see the photo gallery on the NANPA website.  The period for entering your best shots in this year’s Showcase began August 1st  and runs until through September 16th.  What are you waiting for?  Let’s get shooting!  Your best shot might be your next one.

Continue reading

The Scale of Impact

This photo was taken in Ilulissat, Greenland’s third-largest city and home to Ilulissat Icefjord, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. A hiker foregrounds a colossal iceberg, a scene that left me in wonder that micro humans have accelerated the rate at which macro icebergs are produced.
This photo was taken in Ilulissat, Greenland’s third-largest city and home to Ilulissat Icefjord, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. A hiker foregrounds a colossal iceberg, a scene that left me in wonder that micro humans have accelerated the rate at which macro icebergs are produced.

Story & photos by Bridget Ye

As admirers, students, educators and conservators of our natural world, nature photographers strive to capture the essence of both the intimate micro and extraordinary macro. We might photograph creatures on the brink of extinction or landscapes in decay, yet rarely do we include ourselves in the portrayal and definition of “nature”. The presence and influence of humanity on the environment has often been detrimental and, sometimes, it seems that the environment reciprocates with natural disasters. A comparison of resilience, though, reveals that nature has a tendency to prevail over time and will probably continue to do so. Try as we might to build and rebuild in notorious flood zones or to erect dams that reconfigure river systems for our benefit, nature does not just meekly surrender to human desires. It often seems as though adaptation, a fundamental skill for survival for all things living in the natural world, is lost on us.

Continue reading