Be the Change, Make a Difference

A least tern feeds a fish to his young while the mate watches and broods another chick under her wing. 1200mm, 1/1000, f/8, 1/3 EV, ISO 250 © Mary Lundeberg
A least tern feeds a fish to his young while the mate watches and broods another chick under her wing. 1200mm, 1/1000, f/8, 1/3 EV, ISO 250 © Mary Lundeberg

By Frank Gallagher, NANPA Blog Coordinator

Are you a change agent? Do you want to make a difference? Now’s your chance! In honor of its 25th birthday, the NANPA Foundation set an ambitious goal to raise $25,000 and is well over half way there. This week, an anonymous donor offered to match, dollar for dollar up to $2,500, all donations to the NANPA Foundation.

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Philip Hyde Conservation Grant: Rare Bumble Bees and Vanishing Wetlands

A photo of a bee landing on a light purple flower in a field. Two-form Bumble Bee (Bombus bifarius) on Lupine, Bridger Range, Bozeman, Montana © Clay Bolt
Two-form Bumble Bee (Bombus bifarius) on Lupine, Bridger Range, Bozeman, Montana © Clay Bolt

The Philip Hyde Conservation Grant is a $2,500 grant awarded by the NANPA Foundation to a NANPA member pursuing a peer-reviewed environmental project that aligns with NANPA’s and the NANPA Foundation’s missions. Applications for the 2021 grant are being accepted through 11 p.m. EDT on October 29th, so there’s still time to apply. Past recipients have been engaged in projects covering a wide gamut of locations, ecosystems, plants, and animals. As part of their responsibilities, grant awardees periodically report on their progress. Last month, 2020 grant recipient Mary Lundeberg reported on her work protecting nesting shorebirds on Florida beaches. Today, we hear from more previous awardees on how their projects are progressing.

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Spring Flowers

Photo of the Estes Valley outside of Rocky Mountain National Park after a spring snowstorm. ©  Dawn Wilson
A view of Estes Valley outside of Rocky Mountain National Park after a spring snowstorm. © Dawn Wilson

By Dawn Wilson, NANPA President

Welcome to the month of spring flowers!

Well, for most people it should be. As I type this blog post, it is snowing again here in Colorado. The snow is a welcome weather occurrence as we desperately need the moisture, but it does do a number on those flowers people plant before the recommended planting date of Mother’s Day in Colorado. Much of Colorado, like the West, is still under severe drought conditions, bringing with it the fear of yet another difficult wildfire season. Fingers crossed that is not the case.

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Apply Now for the Janie Moore Greene Scholarship Grant

Photo of Red Maple in Autumn in South Carolina © jon holloway
Red Maple in Autumn in South Carolina © jon holloway

By Frank Gallagher, NANPA Blog Coordinator

Know anyone going to college to study photography? Then they ought to know about this terrific opportunity from the NANPA Foundation. The Janie Moore Greene Scholarship Grant is a $2,000 award given biennially, through the generosity of Janie Moore Greene, to a student currently enrolled in, or who has been accepted to, an institution of higher education and will be specializing in the study of photography. The application window closes October 30th at 11:00 p.m. EDT. Don’t let this opportunity slip by!

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Philip Hyde Conservation Grant: Apply Now!

Sunset over the Anacostia River in Prince George's County, Maryland.
Sunset over the Anacostia River in Prince George’s County, Maryland.

By Frank Gallagher, NANPA Blog Coordinator

There’s no shortage of ideas for great nature photography and conservation projects. And there are certainly many problems to address. What’s often lacking is funding, especially in a pandemic. If you have a peer-reviewed environmental project, the NANPA Foundation’s Philip Hyde Conservation Grant might be right up your alley.

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The Old Growth Project

A state-listed endangered species in Florida, the ghost orchid is a leafless plant that photosynthesizes through its roots. Surviving in the subtropical climates of South Florida's Everglades, only an estimated 2000 remain because of poaching pressures. This plant is likely safe from poachers as it took root 50-feet up in a 500-year-old cypress. © Mac Stone.
A state-listed endangered species in Florida, the ghost orchid is a leafless plant that photosynthesizes through its roots. Surviving in the subtropical climates of South Florida’s Everglades, only an estimated 2000 remain because of poaching pressures. This plant is likely safe from poachers as it took root 50-feet up in a 500-year-old cypress. © Mac Stone.

Editor’s Note: Mac Stone received NANPA’s 2018 Philip Hyde Conservation Grant for his project, “Old Growth: Ancient Swamps of the South.” In this project he explores three old growth bottomland hardwood swamps (Beidler Forest, Congaree Swamp and Corkscrew Swamp) that are the last vestiges of unique ecosystems that once dominated the American South. He recently gave us an exciting update.

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