NANPA Foundation Announces 2016 Recipient of the Philip Hyde Grant

Great blue heron on the Anacostia River.

Great blue heron on the Anacostia River. © Krista Schlyer

Award Highlights Use of Photography in Conservation Efforts

The NANPA Foundation is pleased to announce that Krista Schlyer of Mount Rainier, Maryland is the recipient of the 2016 Philip Hyde Grant for her work using photography and visual storytelling to draw attention to one of the United States’ most denuded river ecosystems: the Anacostia River. This $2,500 peer-reviewed grant is awarded annually by the NANPA Foundation to a nature photographer who is actively pursuing completion of an environmental project. Continue reading

Funding for Conservation

Story by John Nuhn, NANPA Foundation President

Blazing orange Tennessee shiners and yellow striped saffron shiners densely pack in around a stoneroller on a river chub nest in a small Smoky Mountain National Park river. © David Herasimtschuk

Blazing orange Tennessee shiners and yellow striped saffron shiners densely pack in around a stoneroller on a river chub nest in a small Smoky Mountain National Park river. © David Herasimtschuk

Philip Hyde Grant Offers Funding for Conservation Photography Projects

Imagine receiving $2,500 to assist your current conservation photography project! The NANPA Foundation’s Philip Hyde Grant could do just that. Continue reading

PHILIP HYDE GRANT: San Pedro Mezquital Project

Story and Photography by Jaime Rojo

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Applications for the 2014 Philip Hyde Grant are due on November 30th, 2013. This $2,500 grant, provided by Fine Print Imaging through its Art for Conservation program, the NANPA Environment Committee and individual donations, is awarded annually by the NANPA Foundation to an individual NANPA member who is actively pursuing completion of a peer-reviewed environmental project that is consistent with the missions of NANPA and the NANPA Foundation. Click here to apply

Project Update from Jaime Rojo: 2012 Recipient of the Philip Hyde Grant

The San Pedro Mezquital project is an ongoing communications effort to protect the last free-flowing river in the Western Sierra Madre, Mexico. The river is under threat by several development projects, including a dam in the middle basin and a huge tourist resource in the upper basin.

The Philip Hyde Grant that I obtained in May 2012 was used to continue the documentation of this huge river basin, but also to give public presentations in the upper and lower basin to involve the local communities in the actions to protect the river.

In May 2012, we inaugurated a large format exhibit of the San Pedro Mezquital that was hosted by the three main cities of the basin, following the course of the river on its way to the sea. I gave presentations on Durango and Tepic on the day of the exhibit launch, and had meetings with regional authorities involved in the management of the river basin:

– Durango, upper basin, May 2012

– Presidio, middle basin, Oct 2012

– Tepic, lower basin, Jan 2013

Also, in January 2013, I did a 2-week expedition with my colleague Octavio Aburto, co-financed by National Geographic Explorers Fund, to document some of the most remote parts of the upper basin (Chachacuaxtle canyon and the Tres Molinos basin), with some surprising results, and a field blog was published in National Geographic Newswatch.  The Philip Hyde Grant represented a great opportunity to continue the conservation photography work in the San Pedro Mezquital river and I will always be thankful for NANPA’s support.

Please take a moment to check out the San Pedro Mezquital website, and this multimedia piece that I produced for NANPA Foundation called San Pedro Mezquital.

 

Children at a project exhibit in Durango, Mexico

Children at a project exhibit in Durango, Mexico

NANPA PHOTOGRAPHER PROJECT: Sacred Headwaters


by Paul Colangelo

Unnamed tributary of Chismore Creek, British Columbia, 2010

 

The Sacred Headwaters in northern British Columbia is the shared birthplace of three great salmon rivers—the Stikine, Skeena and Nass. It is also the traditional territory of the Tahltan First Nation, and it supports a vast ecosystem known for large numbers of moose, caribou, sheep, goats, wolves and bears.

In 2004, Shell obtained tenure of nearly a million acres in the heart of the Sacred Headwaters for a coal bed methane development that would entail thousands of wells connected by roads and pipelines, fracturing wildlife habitat. The water-intensive fracking process that would be used to remove the methane risked altering water levels and contaminating the rivers. Continue reading