Grand Teton NP with Jason Eldridge and Beth Ruggiero-York

The Grand Teton National Park for lack of better words is well… grand. The peaks jut straight up out of a relatively flat area allowing for pristine views of the Grand Teton portion of the Rocky Mountains. One of the most iconic images of the Tetons comes from Ansel Adams at the Snake River Overlook. This image is one of many which have inspired photographers young and old. Snake River Overlook is one of the many places we will visit as we chase the light.

Monday night, May 20th, we will all meet in the hotel conference room set aside for the Nature Photography Show This will be for an orientation and to go over the itinerary for the following three days as well as get a sense of what each of you is looking for out of the workshop.

Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday will be filled, sunrise to sunset, with photographic opportunities as we explore the Tetons visiting many of the famous locations. Each day there will be an opportunity to look at what you have captured and receive post processing instruction. Finally, after photographing sunrise at Schwabachers Landing on May 24th we will meet for a recap and a final breakfast as everyone leaves on their own.

Workshop Includes:
• Photographic instruction
• Lodging: This is based on double occupancy. If you wish to have a private room it can be arranged for an additional fee.

What’s not included:
• Transportation: Transportation to and from the airport or during the workshop is not provided.
• Food

Grand Teton Autumn with Jess Lee

Autumn is an incredibly special time in Jackson Hole and Grand Teton National Park

It is the perfect time for the explosion of autumn color. The aspens will be turning the air crisp and there usually is fresh snow in the mountains. The Teton’s are one of the worlds most dramatic mountain ranges and we will show you the best locations and how to capture images of the stunning land called Jackson Hole. Here you will have time to learn new techniques to improve your photography. We take a hands on approach and have you learn in the field while photographing great subjects. We will be there to instruct you in the field as you work on composition, proper exposure for unique lighting situations, and the use of depth of field to make creative decision when you create a image. We will show you how to capture images in the camera whit good technique, which, ultimately results in less time spent in the computer post processing.

Photographing Grand Teton National Park

A Great Location to Visit during NANPA’s Nature Photography Celebration

NANPA is hosting a Nature Photography Celebration  on May 20-22 in Jackson, Wyoming, gateway to the Tetons.  Join fellow photographers for networking, keynote presentations, vendor demos, inspiration, gallery crawls, and more while you’re in the area.  More information at http://www.nanpa.org/events/nature_celebration/

 

Story and photography by Don Smith

Without a doubt, one of my favorite of all the national parks to photograph is Grand Teton.

Perhaps it’s the starkness and beauty of the Grand Teton Range, but there is so much more to what makes this national park an endless source of fascination for photographers.

The main area of the park is accessible via what is called the inner and outer loop. The outer loop is Highway 191, which connects the town of Jackson with Yellowstone National Park to the north. The inner loop takes one closer to the base of the range.

As you enter the park from Jackson (located five miles south), you immediately encounter the view of the majestic Grand Teton Range.

One of the most iconic views is from a location known as Schwabacher Landing. The Snake River dissects the park. Some tributaries and beaver ponds have formed, creating the opportunity for beautiful reflections and foregrounds.

Lit storm clouds Over Schwabacher Landing, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. ©Don Smith

On fall mornings, one can see more than 100 photographers lined up to photograph first light on the range.

During this year’s Fall in Grand Teton National Park Workshop, I decided to take the group to Schwabacher at both ends of the day and was rewarded with this light at sunset.

Continuing north along Highway 191, one will come across a parking lot area and overview of perhaps the most famous of all the park’s viewpoints, Snake River Overlook.

Ansel Adams’ iconic image from this location captured back in 1942 has been seared into the memories of many landscape photographers.

The scene today looks much different from Adams’ time as pines have grown and obscured much of the Snake River. Rumors have persisted over the years that the park may one day cut back these pines to once again reveal the scene as Adams captured it 76 years ago!

Snake River Overlook, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. ©Don Smith

Another of the park’s most iconic locations comes just past Moran Junction (still on Highway 191).

As the road splits at the Junction, one will soon come to the most incredible of all scenes in the park – Oxbow Bend.

Perhaps never more beautiful than in the fall, the Snake River provides a foreground view that transitions into Cottonwoods and then the range itself with Mt. Moran taking center stage.

Dawn hues at Oxbow Bend, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. ©Don Smith

This past fall, I had my group on location at predawn. As you can see, the river was perfectly still and as the dawn hues arrived, the snow-covered peaks of the Teton Range reflected beautifully, allowing me and my group to create this image.

Oxbow is a location that one can photograph at both ends of the day. My favorite time is morning but I have made some nice images during and after sunset. Sunset works better if there are some clouds in the sky.

T.A. Moulten Barn and storm clouds at sunset, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. ©Don Smith

Other icons of Grand Teton National Park are the T.A. Moulten Barns, located on Mormon Row just off Antelope Flats Road.

This scene is generally photographed in the morning as first light hits the peaks. I decided a couple years ago to try photographing this scene at sunset and came away with this image.

At sunrise, this location can be overrun with photographers. When I captured this image, I had the location to myself.

This lone barn has been restored recently along with other barns and old homes in the Mormon Row Historic District.

Regardless of the time of year you chose to photograph Grand Teton National Park, one thing will remain constant – the beauty will overwhelm your senses!


Don Smith

Having begun his professional career over 40 years ago as a sports photographer, Don successfully transitioned into the world of fine art landscape photography in 2002. For seven years he was a contract photographer for Sports Illustrated and still keeps active in sports as original co-team photographer for the NHL’s San Jose Sharks. The rest of his time is spent on his landscape photography work. Don is renowned for his work as stock photographer for Getty images and as a landscape workshop instructor, teaching 17 workshops per year. He has had cover images for over 30 books internationally. His work has been displayed in the Getty Museums around the world. Don teaches landscape workshops around the western United States from eastern Utah to Kauai. Don is affiliated with Topaz, Helicon Focus, SmugMug Pro, MindShift Gear, Think Tank, and B&H Photo. He is also part of the pro teams at both Singh-Ray and Lexar. In 2014, Don was named to the Sony Artisan of Imagery team of professional photographers. He has written three books: Refined Vision, The Photographer’s Guide to the Big Sur Coast, and On the Edge. He has also recently released a 22-chapter video series titled: A Simplified Method to Processing which followed his successful video series A Simplified Method to Workflow in which he teaches his innovative approach to post-processing. All can be ordered on his web site (www.donsmithphotography.com). Don and his family live in the Monterey Bay area of California.