Death Valley with David and Jennifer Kingham

Death Valley is one of the hottest, driest, and lowest National Parks in the United States. Even with this distinction, it is a landscape that encompasses many dynamic scenes. These qualities make it an endless world of opportunities for beautiful photographs. Evidence of Earth’s forces can be seen all around the park with the carved canyons, never-ending salt flats, mud cracks, sand dunes, mountain ranges, and rock formations. We will be visiting and photographing this park when more pleasant cooler temperatures are occurring. We will photograph and chase the light across this varied and textured landscape, while also heading out one night to photograph under the stars for some night photography. We will be photographing areas such as the Mesquite Dunes, Badwater Basin, and Zabriskie point, and other locations that have become our favorites over the years, which are lesser known. We will photograph larger scenes, and take time to catch the details in more intimate scenes. During the workshop, we will also have classroom time to teach photo processing techniques, and workflow to help your photos stand out! With over 3.4 million acres to explore, there is always something to photograph, and you will not be disappointed. Come photograph and explore this incredible landscape of many faces!

Photoshop for Beginners with Claudia Daniels

Instructor: Claudia Daniels
This intermediate 3-hour workshop will talk about:
• Raw Processing
• Getting to know the toolbar
• The Power of Cropping
• Basic Layers
• Learning Curves & Levels
• Blending Modes
• Retouching Techniques
• File Management
Who should take this class?
This class is designed for people with none or limited knowledge of Adobe Photoshop
CC who would like to use the software to improve or enhance their artistic images.
Prerequisites:
Must have Photoshop CC (free trial can be downloaded prior to attending the workshop)
No other Photoshop knowledge is required
Bring your laptop
Bring 3 images of your choice either RAW or JPG (on your computer or card, card reader will be available for download)
Handouts will be provided

Colorado Fall Colors with David and Jennifer Kingham

Colorado scenery is already a photographer’s dream, but add in the yellow, orange and red of the quaking aspens, you have a set up for scenes that are amazing to photograph. Fall in Colorado is one of the most exciting times during the year. The colors are changing, the mountain peaks usually get their first bit of snow, and the air is crisp. We will take you to some of Colorado’s most scenic areas to photograph, focusing on everything from the colors, to grand scenes and more intimate scenes. This is one of the most scenic areas in Colorado, commonly referred to as “the Switzerland of America.” We will be photographing sunsets and sunrises, along with other mountain and fall color scenes. We will show you how to capture this landscape of color in the various lighting conditions that mountains provide. We will visit some popular areas, along with some areas off the beaten path away from the crowds that we have explored and discovered ourselves over the years. Come along to photograph and experience the most colorful time of year in Colorado with us!

Colorado Wildflowers with David and Jennifer Kingham

Summer in the high country of Colorado means gorgeous alpine views, snowmelt and with that, carpets of wildflowers. Wildflower season usually peaks near the end of July in the Colorado high country. Join us on a photographic adventure into the heart of alpine country! We will be based in the San Juan Mountains. Set among the peaks of the San Juans and old mining camps, the flower displays combined with blue alpine lakes are a photographer’s dream. We will spend four days adventuring in Jeeps to the wildflowers that are only accessible by 4×4. Waterfalls, fields of paintbrush flowers, and crystal clear alpine lakes left behind by the glaciers are just a few examples of what we will be photographing. Both of these areas are near and dear to our photographic hearts, and we have spent extensive time exploring, scouting, and photographing these places ourselves. If you’re looking for a summer photography adventure, join us in the high country of colorful Colorado!

Take your Photography to the Max! – Online Class with Lewis Kemper

Lewis Kemper’s Master Class Take your Photography to the Max! – Online Class

Photography is not rocket science. There are no magic formulas for taking great images. All it takes is careful seeing, and a conscience effort to take advantage of light, color and composition to make a great picture. Once that picture is created, a good, strong working knowledge of how best to process the image to bring out all its potential is essential, and is what elevates a good picture, to a great picture.

I have been teaching photography and writing articles and books for over 45 years. I have taught online classes for many years, both at Betterphoto.com and the Arcanum. I am combining the techniques I have learned through all of my experiences to make this the best learning opportunity possible. We all have busy lives, nobody can take weeks off to study. But with this class you get ten lessons to complete in a five-month period.

Unlike other classes, in this class, there will be video lessons, assignments, live one-to-one reviews, group hang outs, unlimited Q&A, group review and group interaction. Not only will you have access to Lewis Kemper, but also, all the students will be able to see all the reviews and interact with each other, coaching, questioning and learning together as an enhanced group experience.

Lessons will be given out every two weeks and you have two weeks to watch the lessons and do the assignments, upload your images, get advice from fellow students and then finally present your work for a live screen share lesson review with the instructor. Reviews will average 15 – 30 minutes. That is up to 4.5 hours of indvidual review time per student! All reviews will be recorded and shared with the group, so you can see what took place with your fellow students and learn together. We will also schedule time to try (it is not always possible for everyone to attend) to have 3 group screen share meetings, where you can ask questions, meet each other and share ideas.

And the best part of the whole thing is we can be flexible; if you can’t get one lesson done in time, just make it up later as long as you complete all ten lessons in the five month period.

We will be using a Facebook social learning group for the platform (all reviews and group meetings will be private and only accessible to group members). You will need to have a Facebook account, to participate.

It is like taking a whole college semester at your own pace, when it’s convenient for you!

The goal, of this five-month course, is to learn to recognize and use light, color, and composition as elements of your designs. And then learning the skills to accentuate the star of your image, and compel and guide, your viewers eye throughout your image.

Ansel Adams used to say, “The negative is my score and the print is my performance.”

We are going to learn to properly use the tools of light, color and composition to create the perfect score and then use the tools of Adobe Camera Raw/Lightroom Develop module to create the perfect performance.

Click the link to see the whole class outline.

The Color of Winter: Techniques to Enhance Winter Photos

The Pool frozen over at sunrise Central Park New York, NY

The Pool frozen over at sunrise, Central Park, New York, NY (HDR compilation of 5 images).

Story & photography by F.M. Kearney

That time is quickly approaching. That time of year when many photographers will pack away their gear and patiently wait for the first colorful blooms next spring. Yet, winter isn’t completely devoid of color, as some might assume. In fact, if you carefully plan what you shoot and when you shoot, you may be surprised at the amount of color you can coax out of this often-overlooked season.

Continue reading

The Wonders of Water Plants

Water lily with Cokin diffractor filter effect.

Water lily with Cokin diffractor filter effect.

 

Story and Photography by F.M. Kearney

One subject I always look forward to photographing during the summer months is the water lily. Native to the temperate and tropical parts of the world, there are over 50 species of these freshwater plants. However, it isn’t always easy to shoot them creatively. Unless you have access to a natural lake or pond (and are willing to get very wet), you will most likely have to shoot from the sidelines of a reflecting pool in a local park or botanical garden. A long lens will allow you to zoom in for a tight close-up, but you certainly won’t have any options to create those dramatic macro or wide-angle perspectives that are commonly used on other types of more accessible flowers.

Continue reading

A Generational Loss

Story and Photography by Jerry Ginsberg

 

Torres del Paine, Patagonia, Chile.  There is absolutely no substitute for being in the right place at the right time. Capturing the very forst, best rays of dawn mean that we must be all set up and ready to go well in advance. © Jerry Ginsberg

 

Back in the Dark Ages of wet darkrooms, that phrase [generational loss] was used to describe the loss of quality commonly encountered when making a copy of a copy, as opposed to making additional prints from the original negative. Today, however, it seems reasonable to apply that term to a certain loss, or gap in the continuity of institutional memory from an earlier generation of photographers who grew up shooting film to many of our current brethren whose devotion to photography was born in the digital age.

In my experience, many digital photographers can easily fall into the attractive trap of machine-gun shooting while overlooking the fundamentals. It’s easy to get caught up in this. The seductive mood fostered by not having to pay for all of that film and expensive processing never fails to encourage us to shoot more and more.

Just as our civilization migrated from radio to television years ago, we have universally (well, almost) likewise transitioned from analog to digital photography.  But just as both radio and TV require many of the same broadcasting skills, such as the abilities to verbalize and emote effectively, so are film and digital photography comparably similar. It’s axiomatic that both are photography; i.e., – literally “painting with light,” just in a different medium.

El Capitan Reflection, Yosemite National Park. This is the full, un-cropped frame. The shot was composed slowly and carefully while taking advantage of the complementary curves of the rock and the riverbank. © Jerry Ginsberg

It’s clear to all that both are still photography and so rely on the consistent and thoughtful use of the very same basic skills and techniques. For the most part, these are composition and the use of light.

Too often, I see and hear photographers, many with highly sophisticated photo gear and seeming to be really concentrating on making good images, exhibiting a troubling mindset when, employing markedly less than the best technique, they say, “I’ll fix it in Photoshop.”  If only they would mentally take a step back and think about this for an extra minute, many would perhaps realize that, if starting out with a really good image file, it would be much easier and more likely that the final product can be an outstanding photograph.

Photoshop, as well as the many other software tools of the digital darkroom, even though offering an incredibly great degree of control, are there for us to optimize our images and get the best out of them in exactly the same way as we did with chemicals and enlargers in days of yore. These remarkable software programs are not intended to turn bad pictures into good pictures.
Remember that old chestnut, “Garbage in, garbage out?”  It’s just as true now as it ever was.

Let’s begin with the light. By now, we all know, or should know, about the Golden Hour when the sun is near the horizon. Whether morning or evening, the odds are with us at this time of day to be able to take advantage of many wonderful qualities of the light such as relatively low contrast, soft tones, warmth, long shadows and potentially dramatic skies. Even with the great controls in today’s software, we cannot replicate this kind of wonderful light during the harshness of mid-day.

One relevant episode occurred in my mother’s home a few years ago. Soon after my covering her living room walls with about two dozen large prints, my daughter, who fancies herself a photographer, arrived for a visit. She was really excited to see these new images and quickly grabbed a pen and paper to learn and note where I had made each of them.  After managing to suppress a chuckle, I replied, “Listen, it doesn’t matter where I stood to get these shots. By the time you get yourself up and out of the house at the crack of noon, the light that you see here has been gone for several hours.”  The fact is, the sun rises only once each day. There are no do-overs or instant replays. If you miss it, you simply have to wait for another day.

Now let’s turn our attention to composition. The old axiom, “If it’s not helping, it’s hurting!” referring to compositional elements still holds true in the digital age. While we can certainly crop, clone, eliminate fire hydrants, replace skies, etc., in software, there is still no substitute for getting it right the first time. Optimal camera position and framing on site will ultimately result in a more pleasing final image. Much of this reminds me of how many people think of knee replacement surgery. No matter how sophisticated the technology or how good the repair may seem, it’s never as good as the original creation.

If we compose the frame to the very best of our ability, we’ll be way ahead of the game. Cropping reduces our overall file size, often significantly, and the various pixel replacement tools can be very time-consuming.

Clingman’s Dome.  Sunset over the Great Smoky Mountains. This image was made from a very narrow and difficult to reach spot.  There was room for only a couple of people. Photographers are expected to get their shots quickly and then make room for others. © Jerry Ginsberg

Now we come to what is perhaps the least productive aspect of digital photography, aptly named “chomping.”  One of the primary benefits of digital photography is undeniably the ability to see and review our images immediately. This gives us the opportunity to alter our exposure and framing, correct for apparent errors, tweak the results, and re-shoot on the spot if necessary.
So far, so good. But this is where the process can break down. While the large majority of photographers are really considerate, there are sometimes exceptions.  One of my pet peeves and perhaps yours, is the occasional individual who, once finished making images at a particular spot, remains right there staring and often gawking at his/her screen while standing in the very spot either desired by others or smack in the middle of someone else’s composition.

I know, seems like another great application of the object removal/replacement feature of some software even if the inconsiderate photographer in question doesn’t exactly resemble a fire hydrant.
Not being the most patient person in the Western Hemisphere, these situations can make me wish that I have a cattle prod handy. While I grant that this is an extreme remedy and just wishful thinking, perhaps you can relate.

Much as some of us might yearn for the halcyon days of Kodachrome 25, that iconic film is now ensconced in a museum right next to my favorite buggy whip.

Jerry Ginsberg is a freelance photographer whose landscape and travel images have graced the pages and covers of hundreds of books, magazines and travel catalogs. He is the only person to have photographed each and every one of America’s National Parks with medium format cameras.
His works have been exhibited from coast to coast and have received numerous awards in competition.  Jerry’s photographic archive spans virtually all of both North and South America.
More of Ginsberg’s images are on display at www.JerryGinsberg.com  Or e-mail him at jerry@jerryginsberg.com

 

Do Your Shadows Have the Blues?

Story and Photography by By Tom Horton

Fig. 1- Image from micro-4/3 sensor in Olympus E-M1, without color correction, demonstrating blue cast to background shadows. © Tom Horton

Fig. 1- Image from micro-4/3 sensor in Olympus E-M1, without color correction, demonstrating blue cast to background shadows. © Tom Horton

 

 

Human vision has a lot to take in and process, with the result that our brains are constantly on the lookout for low-risk shortcuts as they assemble our visual representations. Magicians and other entertainers routinely use this fact to trick us into seeing what should be there, rather than what really is there, and making a visual error. Continue reading