Spring Migration: A Richness of Diversity

Horned Grebe

Horned Grebe

Story and photography by Bob & Jorja Feldman

Starting in early spring and sometimes even before—snow is often still on the ground here in Ann Arbor, Michigan—something quite extraordinary happens. Migration. Species that we haven’t seen for a long time and sometimes species that we have never seen at all magically show up in the woods and waters around us, offering new photographic opportunities.

We do not live in a bird-rich venue such as south Texas or Florida, nor do we have the luxury of photographing a migration up-close from a blind. Our pursuit requires substantial time, energy, devotion and a lot of scrambling around carrying heavy equipment—typically a lens in the 500mm to 800mm range along with a camera body, an extender or teleconverter, a tripod and a gimbal head.

If we go to a favorite spot early in the morning and nothing is there, we may return in the evening. Even if the sun is in the wrong place for our purposes, we go just to see if there are birds. And we will certainly return the next day, checking out known and new locations, much as a hummingbird works its way from one neighborhood feeder to the next. Continue reading

Photography Close To Home: Backyard Butterflies Story and photographs by Robert and Jorja Feldman

Great spangled Fritillary, © Jorja Feldman

Great spangled Fritillary, © Jorja Feldman

Last month our article on backyard bird photography was published in NANPA eNews, and we described some benefits of shooting in your own backyard. This article is a continuation on backyard photography and includes three attributes of the backyard that make photographing butterflies in this venue especially appealing.

These attributes are immediacy, intimacy and control. Continue reading