Kenya Photography Tour with Daniel J. Cox

1 FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED – LAST SPACE!

Our 14th KENYA PHOTOGRAPHY EXPEDITION is among the best locations to photograph wildlife in the world. If you’ve never visited this magical country, be prepared for incredible wildlife and cultural experiences. From the monkeys trying to get into your tent to the lion prides of the Mara, YOU WILL ENJOY! The photography opportunities are endless and your stories will be shared for many years to come.

We’ll fly between lodges, and this year we’ve also added two extra nights on safari (2 nights in Nairobi and 12 nights at the lodges) along with a private encounter at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust elephant orphanage. Only 3-4 guests max per safari vehicle! Kenya will not get better than it is now—join us!

Tanzania Safari with Greg Downing

Travel in luxury to Tanzania for a once-in-a-lifetime Africa photo safari, featuring the best of East Africa in a custom small group setting for wildlife photography.

The Ultimate Africa Experience

Coupled with our experienced local naturalist guides, among the best around, you’ll be traveling in the company of Greg Downing, a seasoned professional photographer and expert traveler to the region and the specific locales we visit for over 15 years. Greg’s exclusive itinerary takes you to the best places in Tanzania for wildlife photography including Serengeti National Park, the Ngorongoro Crater, and Tarangire National Park, plus an optional extension to the Northwest Serengeti and the famous Mara River. He has carefully planned every detail to offer the best photographic opportunities, vehicles, and drivers as well as luxurious and comfortable accommodations throughout. You simply cannot find a better value anywhere for a luxury Tanzania safari.

Tanzania Great Migration with Shiv Verma

I am offering a trip of a lifetime for 10 of you to observe and photograph The Great Migration in Tanzania this coming August. More than 1 million wildebeest and over 200,000 zebra migrate from The Serengeti in Tanzania to the Maasai Mara in Kenya – crossing the Mara River at the risk of meeting their demise in the jaws of a Nile crocodile. This is the GREATEST wildlife spectacle on earth and we put you in the middle of it and we put you there in comfort!

Not only will you observe the migration but you have excellent prospects at photographing every other awesome animal there is to photograph in Tanzania – giraffe, cape buffalo, leopard, cheetah, rhino, lion, elephant, birds galore, monkeys, hippo, waterbuck, mongoose, baboon, crocs, serval cat(maybe), gazelle, topi, wildebeest zebra, and many, many more.

Costa Rica with Jeff Mauritzen and Steve Morello

Learn from two of the best nature photographers in one workshop! National Geographic Photographer Jeff Mauritzen & photographer Steve Morello will be instructing a one week workshop at Crocodile Bay Resort, located on the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica. Described by National Geographic, as one of “the most biologically intense paces on Earth”, the Osa Peninsula will offer us a chance to photograph all 4 species of monkeys that reside here, birds such as the Scarlet macaw and Chestnut-mandibled toucan, as well as a wealth of trees and poison dart frogs, snakes, turtles and of course, the beautiful rainforest!

Jeff and Steve have both led photo programs for National Geographic & Lindblad Expeditions all over the world, including many in Costa Rica. In our words, “We’ve set up this intensive wildlife photography workshop to bring you the best photo opportunities that Costa Rica has to offer.” Although we will have formal classroom instruction and feedback on your photos, the emphasis on teaching will be in the field, while we are on our excursions. This workshop is an opportunity to learn from two photographers who truly are experts in their field. Their combined experience covers every continent, every habitat, and years of working in the most difficult environments on the planet. Their experience will provide you with a once in a lifetime opportunity to hone your photo skills and learn from the best.

For more details please visit the photo workshop link included here.

A tale of two brothers

Text and photography by Teri Franzen

Life in the African bush is hard for prey animals and apex predators (those at the top of the food chain) alike.  Ungulates (hooved animals) such as zebras, gazelles and wildebeest are constantly wary and keeping watch to ensure they don’t fall victim as food for one of the countless predators that share their territory.  Predators fight among themselves over that same territory.  Lions will fight to take control of existing prides.  They will also fight to drive off other predators, like cheetahs, sharing the same space.  Very often these battles have grim results for the victims.

During my recent trip to Ndutu in northern Tanzania (eastern Africa) we saw many cheetah families living in the Makao plains.  Among them were two bachelor brothers that we had hoped to encounter during our journeys.  With a top speed approaching 70 miles per hour, cheetahs are the fastest land animals in the world.  They can maintain this speed for approximately 500 yards.  As a singular animal a cheetah is capable of chasing down and capturing smaller prey, a favorite being a Thomson’s gazelle.  Adult male cheetahs often form coalitions with siblings.  When teamed up they are capable of bringing down much larger prey, like wildebeest.  We wanted to see this two-male coalition in action.

On January 31, during our morning game drive we happened upon a lone cheetah that had climbed onto a fallen tree.  It started calling and before we identified the gender we suspected a female calling for her young.  As we looked more closely we realized it was a male and that it was injured.  His mouth was wounded and his elbows rubbed raw.   This was one of the brothers, only his sibling was nowhere in sight.  Our best guess was that the two cheetahs had been victims of a lion attack during the night.  Either the second male had been killed or severely injured, or he escaped and ran in another direction.

Injured cheetah searching for his brother.

A closer look at his mouth injury.

The wounded cheetah wandered from tree to tree, sniffing for signs of his brother and then sending a stream of his own urine toward the tree.  Like all cats, cheetahs have a keen sense of smell and can identify an individual by its unique scent.  During this time he called continuously with a forlorn cry, presumably with the hope of vocally contacting his sibling.  Occasionally he would leap onto a fallen tree to search and call from a higher vantage point.  Allowing enough distance to avoid interference we followed the lone male for over an hour.  During that time his pace was constant, his conviction never faltered. Continue reading