Snowy Owls with David Hemmings

Meet the Silent Ghosts of the Great White North. During this adventure you will have the opportunity to capture your own image of the Snowy Owl against a cool winter background of snow and ice. Explore, travel and photograph Ontario winter scenery. These cool temperatures bring out crisp blue sky backgrounds . Use your skills and creativity to utilize cool tones, natural winter settings, evergreens, and snowflakes with your subject. Learn to adapt to lighting changes and techniques to get the best possible photograph. We will take you on a journey to secret hideaways of these beauty’s allowing you to enjoy a profound experience of photographing the owl. On this adventure you will leave with a true appreciation of these magnificent creatures.

Snowy Owls with David Hemmings

Meet the Silent Ghosts of the Great White North. During this adventure you will have the opportunity to capture your own image of the Snowy Owl against a cool winter background of snow and ice. Explore, travel and photograph Ontario winter scenery. These cool temperatures bring out crisp blue sky backgrounds . Use your skills and creativity to utilize cool tones, natural winter settings, evergreens, and snowflakes with your subject. Learn to adapt to lighting changes and techniques to get the best possible photograph. We will take you on a journey to secret hideaways of these beauty’s allowing you to enjoy a profound experience of photographing the owl. On this adventure you will leave with a true appreciation of these magnificent creatures.

Snowy Owls by Bernie Friel

DSLR
Snowy Owls: In Minnesota in Record Numbers

Text and Photographs by Bernie Friel

Not only is Minnesota experiencing record cold this winter, (an average January daytime temperature of 8º F) but to warm the hearts, if not the bodies of nature photographers (and bird watchers alike), there has been a record migration of snowy owls into the state. While in most years a few may be seen in far northern Minnesota, this year they have been found at more than 250 locations throughout the state. They have also been found into Iowa and as far south as Kansas. The presence in such great numbers of this bird of the Arctic tundra is thought to be a consequence of the crash in the lemming population (sometimes called the tundra potato chip) in their home hunting grounds, causing them to seek food further south.  Continue reading