Galapagos with Suzi Eszterhas and Tui De Roy

Travel by luxurious ship from island to island, wandering among animals that have no fear of people. We’ll photograph albatross, penguins, flamingos, blue-footed boobies, frigatebirds, giant tortoises, marine iguanas, and more. Snorkel in emerald waters with playful sea lions, sea turtles, and brilliantly colored tropical fish.

While most tours offer only one-week at sea, this tour offers a full two weeks. Suzi has teamed up with legendary Galapagos photographer and expert, Tui De Roy to offer a unique experience that will put us on shore with wildlife at first and last light, when most other tour groups are noticeably absent.

We have chosen the coolest time of year in Galapagos, when the seas are most productive and many species are nurturing cute babies.

Yellowstone and Grand Teton Fall with John Slonina

Best of Yellowstone and Grand Tetons

These world famous parks are some of the most exciting places in the world to photograph landscapes and wildlife. This is a must see on any nature photographers list. September is a great time to visit as the huge summer crowds and traffic jams are gone. The legendary wildlife is more abundant and in full winter coats, the rut, stunning scenic, and fall foliage. Iconic Waterfalls, geysers, mountain ranges and much more. Witness incredible natural events.

This is the peak time for Fall color.

This workshop is led by professional nature photographer John Slonina who has been leading tours there for several years.
Authorized permittee of the national park.

Small Group Size: 6 People
Transportation Provided to and from Airport. You do not have to rent a car.

All skill levels

John Slonina
Slonina Photography
Email: jtslonina@aol.com
Phone: 508-736-1167
http://www.sphotography.com

Grand Teton National Park with Andrew Slaton

Grand Teton is one of the best national parks for landscapes and wildlife, so on this exciting workshop, we will focus on several iconic locations, but we will also discuss the use of filtration, and post processing, and if possible, we will shoot night landscapes & star pictures. Summer is a great time of year in the Tetons, because the temps are warm, animals abound, wildflowers flourish, and summer storms create dynamic light and incredible cloud drama.

Tangier Island with Irene Hinke-Sacilotto 

My spring 2018 Tangier Island Photo Workshop features photography of a unique waterman community and local wildlife.  Just south of the Maryland line, in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay, lays Tangier Island, VA. Covering approximately 1.2 square miles, Tangier Island is actually a series of small islands connected by narrow wooden bridges spanning marshes and tidal creeks. Tangier is a charming community of waterman and shop owners. Many inhabitants make their living, as did their ancestors for more than 400 years, by crabbing, fishing, and oystering. Each day we will rise before dawn, hoping to capture sunrise images and photos of the waterman as they man their skiffs and works boats, heading out to their offshore crab shanties to gather up their crab pots, scrapes, floats, and other gear for the day. For photos from the water, Saturday morning I chartered a boat for a trip around the island with the hopes of photographing the docks, waterman at work, and local birdlife.

During our stay, we will explore the beach, tidal creeks, and wetlands in search of wildlife. Ducks, geese, herons, rails, shorebirds, skimmers, terns, and pelicans take advantage of the rich food supply that the island and its surroundings afford. There is also a healthy population of ospreys nesting on nearby platforms and jetties. It is not uncommon to see one fly overhead with a fish in its talons..

Includes: One-on-one instruction; image critiques; two night’s accommodations at a B&B; full breakfast; boat charter trip to photograph crab shanties, waterman and ospreys from the water; and transportation around the island by golf cart.

Photo workshop size limited 3-8 participants.

Florida Wildlife with John Slonina

Florida Birds and Wildlife (Everglades and Big Cypress)
Escape the cold and join us in paradise as we photograph the wild areas of Florida. We will be photographing Alligators, Nesting Eagles, Ospreys, Hawks, Owls, Pelicans, Spoonbills, Herons and Alligators and many more species of wildlife. We will explore beautiful coastlines and swamps. The majority of the time we will spend at my favorite Everglades and Big Cypress national parks.

This workshop is led by professional nature photographer John Slonina who has been leading tours there for several years.
Small Group Size: 6 People
Transportation Provided to and from Airport. You do not have to rent a car.

All skill levels

John Slonina
Slonina Photography
Email: jtslonina@aol.com
Phone: 508-736-1167
http://www.sphotography.com

Everglades NP with Andrew Slaton

The Everglades ecosystem is one of the best areas for stunning landscapes and varied wildlife, so on this exciting workshop, we will focus on several iconic locations, but we will also discuss the use of filtration, and post processing, and shoot night landscapes & star pictures. Winter is my favorite time of year in the Everglades, because there are cooler temps, no mosquitos, tons of migratory birds, and a great quality to the light! It’s the perfect getaway for us snowbirds.

A tale of two brothers

Text and photography by Teri Franzen

Life in the African bush is hard for prey animals and apex predators (those at the top of the food chain) alike.  Ungulates (hooved animals) such as zebras, gazelles and wildebeest are constantly wary and keeping watch to ensure they don’t fall victim as food for one of the countless predators that share their territory.  Predators fight among themselves over that same territory.  Lions will fight to take control of existing prides.  They will also fight to drive off other predators, like cheetahs, sharing the same space.  Very often these battles have grim results for the victims.

During my recent trip to Ndutu in northern Tanzania (eastern Africa) we saw many cheetah families living in the Makao plains.  Among them were two bachelor brothers that we had hoped to encounter during our journeys.  With a top speed approaching 70 miles per hour, cheetahs are the fastest land animals in the world.  They can maintain this speed for approximately 500 yards.  As a singular animal a cheetah is capable of chasing down and capturing smaller prey, a favorite being a Thomson’s gazelle.  Adult male cheetahs often form coalitions with siblings.  When teamed up they are capable of bringing down much larger prey, like wildebeest.  We wanted to see this two-male coalition in action.

On January 31, during our morning game drive we happened upon a lone cheetah that had climbed onto a fallen tree.  It started calling and before we identified the gender we suspected a female calling for her young.  As we looked more closely we realized it was a male and that it was injured.  His mouth was wounded and his elbows rubbed raw.   This was one of the brothers, only his sibling was nowhere in sight.  Our best guess was that the two cheetahs had been victims of a lion attack during the night.  Either the second male had been killed or severely injured, or he escaped and ran in another direction.

Injured cheetah searching for his brother.

A closer look at his mouth injury.

The wounded cheetah wandered from tree to tree, sniffing for signs of his brother and then sending a stream of his own urine toward the tree.  Like all cats, cheetahs have a keen sense of smell and can identify an individual by its unique scent.  During this time he called continuously with a forlorn cry, presumably with the hope of vocally contacting his sibling.  Occasionally he would leap onto a fallen tree to search and call from a higher vantage point.  Allowing enough distance to avoid interference we followed the lone male for over an hour.  During that time his pace was constant, his conviction never faltered. Continue reading

A feeling is worth a thousand pictures

Story and photography by Tim Irvin

We were deep in the Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia, Canada (about 500 miles northwest of Seattle), the home of the white spirit bear. Before us was what we had hoped for. The bear had accepted our presence and was now perched on a rock mid-stream scanning the creek for salmon. Her white fur was wet from overnight rain and steam rose from her back in the morning sun. It was like a scene from National Geographic television – only this was live.

Spirit bears (also known as Kermode bears) are an exceedingly rare sub-species of American black bear with a recessive genetic trait that makes their fur white. There are perhaps only 200 to 400 in existence and they are found only in British Columbia's Great Bear Rainforest. © Tim Irvin

Spirit bears (also known as Kermode bears) are an exceedingly rare sub-species of American black bear with a recessive genetic trait that makes their fur white. There are perhaps only 200 to 400 in existence and they are found only in British Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest. © Tim Irvin

Our group of photographers and nature buffs was thrilled. Between snapping photos we glanced at each other – smiling widely, giving each other the thumbs up. We never could have imagined this exact scene beforehand, but the hope of being part of something like this was why we had come. Continue reading

Getting to know you; A year-long project

Story and photography by Kathy Lichtendahl

I admit it…I am spoiled by where I live. Northwest Wyoming, with its easy access to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, is a nature photographer’s paradise. In the summer months I can be in Lamar Valley within two hours. In early winter, an hour’s drive south puts me in range to capture that magnificent moment when two bighorn rams collide with incredible force and in spring I have the joy of photographing young pronghorn and elk literally in my backyard.

Heart Mountain, October 24, 2016 © Kathy Lichtendahl

Heart Mountain, October 24, 2016
© Kathy Lichtendahl

But even in this amazing environment, there are those months when the photo doldrums set in and I wonder if I will ever get another opportunity to shoot something that makes my heart beat a little bit faster. That is why, every January 1, I try to come up with a personal photo project instead of the typical New Year’s resolution. I started this practice a couple years ago when I felt the need for a challenge to get me through the long cold months that stretched to spring. Continue reading

THIS BIRDING LIFE: Sandhill Cranes Blanketing the Sky & Land

Story and photo by Budd Titlow

A pair of Sandhill cranes feeding in a marshy wetland. © Budd Titlow

A pair of sandhill cranes feeding in a marshy wetland. © Budd Titlow

The brisk spring air was punctuated by a gusty wind as I stood in breathless anticipation beside the main gates. Once inside, we stealthily crept up the steps of the permanent wooden blind where we could see silhouettes of thousands of birds blanketing the riverbed’s shallow channels and naked sandbars.

The world’s oldest surviving bird species, the sandhill crane still appears curiously archaic. With legs dangling and bent in an awkward landing posture, and neck and wings extended, it is reminiscent of the ancient pterodactyl, the extinct flying reptile. Fossilized remains of the sandhill have been found in Nebraska sediments dating from the Lower Pliocene, some nine million years ago. This has led scientists to theorize that today’s sandhill crane has remained unchanged since that long-ago epoch. Continue reading