Winter in Yellowstone with Daniel J. Cox

2019 Winter in Yellowstone Photography Tour – Photograph the “Winter Wonderland” of Yellowstone National Park in the comforts of a private luxury snow coach with wildlife photographer Daniel J. Cox.

Along the snowy trails, we’ll stop to photograph the beautiful landscapes and mountain vistas surrounded by steamy geysers, along with a variety of wildlife, including the majestic elk, mammoth bison, coyotes, swans, and bald eagles. These creatures, big and small, find warmth near many of the thermal areas, creating unique and stunning imagery. We’ve had some years with great wolf viewing and hope to have similar opportunities again in 2019.

Northern Lights with Gordon and Cathy Illg

Photograph the aurora from right outside your room! We’ll be staying in backcountry lodges with all the amenities, and photographing the lights each night if they show. We’ll also photograph an ice museum and the International Ice Art Championships.

Everglades and Florida West Coast with Tom Mace

Join us as we take you on an exciting photography journey through some of the best locations to photograph Birds, Alligators, Land and Seascapes Florida has to offer. We have seasonally visited many of these South Florida hot spots for wildlife while living in South Florida for 2 years. The mild winter weather in Florida at this time of year is amazing. Hundreds of photographers each year flock to Florida to chase the huge populations of birds migrating and nesting in this warm climate wonderland. If you are looking to escape the chill of winter in what many believe are the best birding photography locations in the country, then this is the trip for you. Due to the popularity of this adventure, we are offering two back to back trips to accommodate demand. This trip is all inclusive, all ground transportation, lodging, meals, park fees, and all the little things are taken care of. See our site for more details
This trip starts in Fort Meyers, FL
We are authorized park permittees in all government regulated locations, this includes National Parks and Wildlife Refuges.
3 key destinations.
Everglades National Park
Naples, FL, and refuges in the area
Ft. Meyers, FL and refuges in the area.

Yellowstone in Winter with Sandy Zelasko

Join us as we travel into the magical winter landscape called Yellowstone!

Emerge yourself! Concentrate on photographing winter wildlife and mystic landscapes during this week of intense photography in the best place on earth! The trip itinerary has been carefully planned to maximize photographic opportunities for YOU! Arranged for the nature photo enthusiast as a unique journey to explore the wonders of Yellowstone National Park during winter season. All photographic skill levels are welcome. Our goal is for you to enjoy your time with fellow photographers and leave with outstanding images from the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

All transportation from Bozeman, MT included, six nights total. Two days of Snowcoach travel in the interior of the park and one night at the historic Snow Lodge at Old Faithful. See the itinerary for full details.

Yellowstone/Teton In Winter with Gordon and Cathy Illg

Come photograph the best of Yellowstone & Grand Teton National Parks in winter! We’ll spend 6 days with iconic features and wildlife, including the National Elk Refuge, staying overnight in Old Faithful Village & the wildlife-rich Lamar Valley.

Wind River Bighorns with Sandy Zelasko

Join the National Bighorn Sheep Center and professional photographer Sandy Zelasko for a day of winter bighorn sheep photography in the Whiskey Basin of the Wind River Mountain Range.

Improve your overall knowledge of one of the largest wintering wild sheep herds in North America while fine tuning your photographic skills in winter environments. Learn why depth of field is an important tool when photographing wildlife and conquer exposure in snow conditions. Never be fooled by your camera’s metering system again!

Transportation to all viewing spots is included in the cost of the workshop. Bagged lunch is available for an additional fee.

Good Images In Bad Weather

Story and photography by F.M. Kearney

 

Blizzard conditions by reservoir in Central Park.  New York, NY © F.M. Kearney

 

Blizzards – a time to cuddle up by the fire (or a good heater) with a nice hot bowl of soup and watch the wonders of nature unfold from within the confines of your warm home. This may be the ideal way to ride out “bad” weather to some people, but to nature photographers, it’s a golden opportunity to capture some unique images under very unique conditions.

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Facing the Howling Blizzard with Your Camera

Story and Photographs by Hank Erdmann

© Hank

Peninsula Ice © Hank Erdmann

Facing the Howling Blizzard with Your Camera by Hank Erdmann

Winter is a wonderful time to pursue the art of nature and outdoor photography. Too many photographers put their cameras away once the leaves have fallen and don’t take them out again until cherry trees blossom. Photographing in winter does however take some dedication or at least enjoyment of the outdoors regardless of the weather. Just as when weather changes and rain begins to fall, some of your best shots will be made when those weather changes start or end. But as with rain, snow and cold weather require some precautions to protect your equipment and yourself.

In cold weather you have to get to the subject and safely back. Common sense says if you are cold, wet, shaking and miserable, the quality of your photographs will reflect your mental and physical state. Your comfort zone is a range of temperature that your body can operate effectively in and be relatively unaffected by uncomfortable conditions. That zone is different for all of us, narrower for some and wider for others. If you are not reasonably comfortable, your photography will reflect that fact. Its hard to get tack sharp, correctly exposed images if you are shaking, even with your camera mounted securely on a tripod. It will be impossible to concentrate on exposure and composition if your mind is preoccupied with keeping your body warm. Remember, you are supposed to be enjoying yourself, only those crazy enough to pursue nature photography as a full-time profession actually need to be out taking photographs in the winter. Whether it is for a vacation or occupation it makes sense to spend some time preparing yourself and your gear to stay within your comfort zone in cold weather. Continue reading

FIELD TECHNIQUE: Capturing the Holiday Spirit

Story and Photographs by F.M. Kearney

Photographing outdoor holiday decorations is fun. It’s even better if you don’t have to deal with hordes of tourists tripping over your tripod. Probably best of all is when the decorations are in a natural setting that most tourists (and residents) don’t know about.

In addition to the annual, world-famous lighting of the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree in New York, there’s also the lighting of a slightly smaller display in Central Park. Each year, a flotilla of 13 trees is launched on a tiny “island” in the less-visited, northern section of the park. When I first saw it years ago, I actually thought it was a real island. I shot it at night and used the usual combo for best quality, i.e., low ISO and small aperture. As you may suspect, the results were less than successful. Although I didn’t detect it at the time, the subtle but constant movement of the artificial island ruined every shot due to the long exposures.

ISO 400, f/8

ISO 400, f/8

That was in the days of film when you were locked into a single ISO setting for all the pictures on the roll. Thankfully, today’s digital cameras are much more versatile. Not only can you change the ISO at will, but the resulting noise at the higher settings is much less than what you would have gotten with film. Additionally, more detail can be pulled out of the highlights and shadows due to their greater dynamic range capabilities. If the contrast is too strong, however, you may need to turn to HDR software.

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NATIONAL PARKS: Yellowstone in Winter

Story by Jerry Ginsberg. Photography by Kevin Horsefield

Winter Wonderland

Winter Wonderland © Kevin Horsefield

Yellowstone, the world’s very first national park and one of the most popular, was established in 1872. Most of us think of it as a place to visit in spring, summer and fall, but certainly not in winter.

Wyoming winters can be brutally cold with great snow accumulations. The Yellowstone Plateau where the park sits averages 8,000 feet of elevation. This high elevation makes the sun more intense and the alpine weather patterns more dynamic and unpredictable.

Sound forbidding? Well, it can be. Indeed, the park was pretty much devoid of wintertime visitors until the advent of specialized cold-weather tourism several years ago. Since the cold is often intense and the snows deep, what’s the point, you might ask? Continue reading