Japan Winter Wildlife with Daniel J. Cox

Encounter and photograph the wild and mystical wildlife of Japan, including the charismatic “hot tubbing” snow monkeys (Japanese macaques) in central Honshu. These fun-loving monkeys are curious and human-like, playing, chasing, and even throwing snowballs at each other like little children in a snowball fight.

We’ll travel north to the island of Hokkaido where bird life dominates the winter landscape. The elegant Japanese crane will dance in and out of our lenses while one of the world’s largest raptors, the Steller’s sea eagle, performs in the sky above us. We’ll also have great opportunities for red fox and deer.

Soak in the onsen next to a playful snow monkey, photograph a pirouetting crane, or just simply have tea at one of the many traditional charming ryokans. Japan will be an unforgettable experience—join us in 2020!

Winter Yellowstone with Jennifer King

Our 2020 photo workshop is a special celebration of Winter in Yellowstone. We will be staying inside the park during our workshop so that we may have access to Old Faithful at night. Private Snow Coaches will escort us through the corners of the park for photographing landscapes and wildlife. We also have arranged for a full day of photographing Lamar Valley in search of the wolves. Please join us for INSIDE YELLOWSTONE: A WINTER TO REMEMBER!

Snow quietly falls and covers the trees and the land, and we awaken to a winter wonderland to explore and photograph. Our private snow coach will take you to places where waterfalls freeze, geysers burst with light and steam, and wildlife wanders through the snow covered valleys.

Churchill Polar Bears with Ken Lee

Every autumn, polar bears concentrate along the shores of the Hudson Bay eagerly anticipating the annual freeze-up which provides them access to their favorite prey, seals. Churchill, Manitoba, on the southern tip of the bay, is one of the first places where the Hudson freezes solid. That’s why Churchill is known as the Polar Bear Capital of the World and the premier place to capture portfolio worthy images of polar bears and other arctic wildlife in their natural habitat. Majestic wildlife, check.

At this time of year, the days are short, but the sun never climbs too high in the sky, so it’s golden hour most of the daylight hours. Great light, check.

We’ve timed this adventure to coincide with the darkest skies of the month. With any luck, we’ll get a shot or two at Aurora Borealis (northern lights) photography. Bonus!

Ken will be right there throughout the expedition to provide tips, critiques, and coaching. Formal instruction, discussions and one-on-one coaching are all parts of the toolkit that Ken uses to help you reach the next milestone on your journey as a photographer.

Practice is just as important as knowledge and you’ll have tons of distraction free time among a small group of like-minded individuals to practice what you’ve learned, refine your skills and sharpen your creative vision.

Winter in Yellowstone with Daniel J. Cox

2019 Winter in Yellowstone Photography Tour – Photograph the “Winter Wonderland” of Yellowstone National Park in the comforts of a private luxury snow coach with wildlife photographer Daniel J. Cox.

Along the snowy trails, we’ll stop to photograph the beautiful landscapes and mountain vistas surrounded by steamy geysers, along with a variety of wildlife, including the majestic elk, mammoth bison, coyotes, swans, and bald eagles. These creatures, big and small, find warmth near many of the thermal areas, creating unique and stunning imagery. We’ve had some years with great wolf viewing and hope to have similar opportunities again in 2019.

The Color of Winter: Techniques to Enhance Winter Photos

The Pool frozen over at sunrise Central Park New York, NY

The Pool frozen over at sunrise, Central Park, New York, NY (HDR compilation of 5 images).

Story & photography by F.M. Kearney

That time is quickly approaching. That time of year when many photographers will pack away their gear and patiently wait for the first colorful blooms next spring. Yet, winter isn’t completely devoid of color, as some might assume. In fact, if you carefully plan what you shoot and when you shoot, you may be surprised at the amount of color you can coax out of this often-overlooked season.

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February Blues

Story and photography by F.M. Kearney

 

Snow-covered trees in Central Park New York, NY (HDR 5-image compilation) © F.M. Kearney

It may be the shortest month of the year, but to some, it can feel like the longest. Many of its days are dull and dreary. The few sunny days there are don’t last that long because it will be at least a month before Daylight Savings Time begins. Even people who love winter may be feeling that it’s high time to pack up the parka. As nature photographers, we find ourselves stuck in a sort of limbo between the last snowstorms of winter and the first blooms of spring. February can be a bit challenging in many ways, but when it comes to photography, it doesn’t have to be a barren wasteland.

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Good Images In Bad Weather

Story and photography by F.M. Kearney

 

Blizzard conditions by reservoir in Central Park.  New York, NY © F.M. Kearney

 

Blizzards – a time to cuddle up by the fire (or a good heater) with a nice hot bowl of soup and watch the wonders of nature unfold from within the confines of your warm home. This may be the ideal way to ride out “bad” weather to some people, but to nature photographers, it’s a golden opportunity to capture some unique images under very unique conditions.

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Facing the Howling Blizzard with Your Camera

Story and Photographs by Hank Erdmann

© Hank

Peninsula Ice © Hank Erdmann

Facing the Howling Blizzard with Your Camera by Hank Erdmann

Winter is a wonderful time to pursue the art of nature and outdoor photography. Too many photographers put their cameras away once the leaves have fallen and don’t take them out again until cherry trees blossom. Photographing in winter does however take some dedication or at least enjoyment of the outdoors regardless of the weather. Just as when weather changes and rain begins to fall, some of your best shots will be made when those weather changes start or end. But as with rain, snow and cold weather require some precautions to protect your equipment and yourself.

In cold weather you have to get to the subject and safely back. Common sense says if you are cold, wet, shaking and miserable, the quality of your photographs will reflect your mental and physical state. Your comfort zone is a range of temperature that your body can operate effectively in and be relatively unaffected by uncomfortable conditions. That zone is different for all of us, narrower for some and wider for others. If you are not reasonably comfortable, your photography will reflect that fact. Its hard to get tack sharp, correctly exposed images if you are shaking, even with your camera mounted securely on a tripod. It will be impossible to concentrate on exposure and composition if your mind is preoccupied with keeping your body warm. Remember, you are supposed to be enjoying yourself, only those crazy enough to pursue nature photography as a full-time profession actually need to be out taking photographs in the winter. Whether it is for a vacation or occupation it makes sense to spend some time preparing yourself and your gear to stay within your comfort zone in cold weather. Continue reading

FIELD TECHNIQUE: Capturing the Holiday Spirit

Story and Photographs by F.M. Kearney

Photographing outdoor holiday decorations is fun. It’s even better if you don’t have to deal with hordes of tourists tripping over your tripod. Probably best of all is when the decorations are in a natural setting that most tourists (and residents) don’t know about.

In addition to the annual, world-famous lighting of the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree in New York, there’s also the lighting of a slightly smaller display in Central Park. Each year, a flotilla of 13 trees is launched on a tiny “island” in the less-visited, northern section of the park. When I first saw it years ago, I actually thought it was a real island. I shot it at night and used the usual combo for best quality, i.e., low ISO and small aperture. As you may suspect, the results were less than successful. Although I didn’t detect it at the time, the subtle but constant movement of the artificial island ruined every shot due to the long exposures.

ISO 400, f/8

ISO 400, f/8

That was in the days of film when you were locked into a single ISO setting for all the pictures on the roll. Thankfully, today’s digital cameras are much more versatile. Not only can you change the ISO at will, but the resulting noise at the higher settings is much less than what you would have gotten with film. Additionally, more detail can be pulled out of the highlights and shadows due to their greater dynamic range capabilities. If the contrast is too strong, however, you may need to turn to HDR software.

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NATIONAL PARKS: Yellowstone in Winter

Story by Jerry Ginsberg. Photography by Kevin Horsefield

Winter Wonderland

Winter Wonderland © Kevin Horsefield

Yellowstone, the world’s very first national park and one of the most popular, was established in 1872. Most of us think of it as a place to visit in spring, summer and fall, but certainly not in winter.

Wyoming winters can be brutally cold with great snow accumulations. The Yellowstone Plateau where the park sits averages 8,000 feet of elevation. This high elevation makes the sun more intense and the alpine weather patterns more dynamic and unpredictable.

Sound forbidding? Well, it can be. Indeed, the park was pretty much devoid of wintertime visitors until the advent of specialized cold-weather tourism several years ago. Since the cold is often intense and the snows deep, what’s the point, you might ask? Continue reading