Mammoth Cave National Park

Story and photography by Jerry Ginsberg

 

Unique limestone formations deep within an open area of Mammoth Cave. © Jerry Ginsberg

 

To my knowledge, there are just five cave systems within our 59 national parks, at least those that are open to the public. While other caverns are found in some national monuments, let’s stick to these big 5 for now.

Continue reading

Book Review – “Treasured Lands,” by QT Luong

Treasured Lands – A Photographic Odyssey through America’s National Parks by QT Luong. – Forward by Dayton Duncan

Book Review by Gary Crabbe

Photographs by QT Long

 

Treasured Lands, by QT Luong

 

I’m sure it’s fair to assume most of us have a bookshelf or two filled with titles that have become personal favorites we’ve collected over time. For many of us, some of those prized items take the form of large, coffee table-format books. The coffee table designation itself implies a place of highest honor where a book can be seen, picked up, and enjoyed by any visitor. For lovers of the American landscape and photography alike, no book is more deserving of this hallmark designation than Treasured Lands by QT Luong.

Continue reading

A Time to Reflect

Tropical Waterlillies © F.M. Kearney

Story and Photographs by F.M. Kearney

The beginning of a new year is a time when many of us make resolutions to end bad habits, or to start that special project we’ve been putting off for months. It’s a time to take stock of our lives and to reflect upon our accomplishments (or lack thereof).

That got me thinking about literal reflections in photography. A perfect mirror image of a subject in a body of water is a great way to add interest and creativity to a photo. The amount of water can be as small as a dew drop on a stem that magically encompasses a floral portrait, to a river that reflects a mighty landscape.

Some reflections are easy to spot. I shot the two waterlilies above at a botanical garden in a reflecting pool – making it practically impossible not to include their reflection. It did take a bit of time, however, to find a “clean” composition where the reflection wasn’t obscured by any of the surrounding lily pads.

Continue reading

Meet David Lester – NANPA Blog Coordinator

David C. Lester, NANPA Blog Coordinator © David C. Lester

Greetings!  I am the new NANPA Blog Coordinator, and have been meaning to write an introductory post since I started in this position several months ago.  I worked with Rebecca Spriggs for several months, and she did a great job of training me in the general mechanics and finer points of WordPress, the platform for our blog.  We were all sorry to see Rebecca leave NANPA for another position, but certainly wish her well in her new work.

I live in Atlanta, and completed a career in health care information technology in 2012.  I’ve been a nature and wildlife photographer for a little over a decade, and started a business with my brother in 2011 called NatureBook Photography.  While I’ve been photographing nature for a while, I also began writing about nature nearly two years ago.

Continue reading

Morgan Heim – Young Photographer Profile

Photographs by Morgan Heim

Interview by David C. Lester

Morgan Heim in the field. © Sara Thomas WWF

Morgan Heim is a full-time freelance nature and wildlife photographer who brings unparalleled intensity and compassion to her work.  The easiest way to appreciate this is to take a look at her website, morganheim.com and go through the projects she has tackled over the past eleven years.  From photographing the work of drug trafficking organizations (primarily the dismantling of their work by scientists and law enforcement agents) that run industrial-scale marijuana growing operations in California forests with an estimated value of $31 billion, and that have a terrible impact on the environment, to stopping along the road to memorialize animals that have been killed by motor vehicles, Morgan’s approach to conservation photography leaves a deep and contemplative impression on the viewer that doesn’t pass quickly.

While Morgan feels lucky to get to work steadily on projects, there is still a tremendous amount that she  wants to do.  “My overarching goal is to have the work that I do provide a meaningful contribution to conservation,” Morgan says.  “I’ve gotten a good start on a lot of things, but there’s a lot left to do, both on the projects I’ve already undertaken, as well as new projects in the future.  For example, fishing cats are still endangered, and a little money was raised to help them, but my work won’t save the fishing cat,” she says.  Morgan says that when she works on a project, she wants to be part of the process and part of the community.  She enjoys the journey and the challenge.  She’s not only excited about creating images, but how she is able to use them.

Continue reading

From the President – Don Carter

NANPA President Don Carter

One of the great things that I get to do as president of NANPA is work with our High School and College Scholarship Program students. During the Summit event, college students work with a client on a multimedia project; they also meet NANPA members and participate in Summit activities. Over the past several years they have produced projects for the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the North Florida Land Trust.

During the summer NANPA brings the high school students to the Great Smoky Mountain Institute at Tremont. This past year all of the NANPA instructors for the high school group were themselves past college participants.

These students are the future of NANPA; they will be our Board of Directors, committee chairs and volunteers. One of these past scholarship winners serves on the current Board. The NANPA Foundation raises the funds for these two programs and the majority of the donations come from our members. We all have lots of activities to attend with families and friends over the holidays but I hope each of you can donate $5.00 to the Foundation. These donations will help NANPA introduce these young photographers to all of the things we hold in high regard–nature photography, education, and being an ethical photographer in the field.

Susan Day, our executive director, wrote about the coming Nature Celebration in Jackson, WY, May 20 – 22, 2018 in her last newsletter column. I want to remind everyone about the presence of Canon, Fujifilm, Olympus, Panasonic, Sigma, and Tamron at the Celebration and that they will be lending the participants gear to be used out in the field. It’s not often we will have access to so many cameras and lenses to use especially in such a beautiful location. Our presentations will be held at the Jackson Center for the Arts, a 500-seat theater located just off the center of downtown Jackson. We have a great line-up of speakers who will be making “Ted Talk” style presentations. I’m really excited about hearing the presentation by Dennis Jorgensen titled “Buffalo-People: The Path Back for Bison and Plains Tribes,” and Jenny Nichols’ presentation, “The Power of Multi-Disciplinary Projects” among others. Check the schedule to see a listing of all the other wonderful presentations at this event.

If you’re looking for a warm place to photograph this winter, NANPA has one event that still has space available in January—at Lake Hodges in southern California. Registration deadline is December 28th.

During the upcoming year NANPA will be offering several new locations for regional events and workshops. The committee is exploring possible locations along the Oregon coast, Moab, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and Madera Canyon in Arizona. We’ll update you as soon as more information is available.

Wishing you and yours a Festive and Peaceful Holiday Season.

Don Carter, NANPA President

 

 

 

From the Executive Director- Susan Day

Susan Day- NANPA Executive Director

 

Hello! As 2017 comes to an end, I have been reflecting on all that happened in NANPA over the last 12 months. As I jotted down highlights, it occurred to me that you also might like to see an overview of NANPA’s past year.

2017 Snapshot of NANPA by the Numbers

1 – 2017 Nature Photography Summit in Jacksonville, FL —attended by nearly 650 members, speakers, and vendors.

5 – Regional Events – Adirondacks, NY; Bosque del Apache, NM; Chincoteague, VA: Southern Illinois; and Yellowstone, MT for spring wildlife.   Total of 100 attendees and 11 leaders.

Continue reading

Truth In Captioning – An Interview with Melissa Groo and Don Carter

Photographs by Melissa Groo

Interview by David C. Lester

 

A Great Horned Owl in Fort Myers, Florida. © Melissa Groo

Although little introduction is needed, Don Carter is the president of NANPA, and Melissa Groo, in addition to being a world-renowned wildlife photographer, is chair of NANPA’s Ethics Committee.  Over the past several years, significant ethical considerations around nature photography have arisen, along with the need to honestly and accurately caption the details of images.

After several years of work, NANPA has developed a new “Truth in Captioning” statement that addresses these and other issues.  I recently sat down with Don and Melissa to talk about ethical considerations in wildlife photography, as well as the work done on this document.

Continue reading

Andrew Snyder – Young Photographer Profile

Photographs by Andrew Snyder

Interview by David C. Lester

Andrew Snyder in the field. © Liz Condo

Andrew Synder is finishing up his Ph.D. in biology at the University of Mississippi.  His dissertation is entitled “Biodiversity and Evolution in the Guyana Shield.”  He is a scientist and a professional photographer, but more about his work later.

Andrew got involved with NANPA in 2013 as one of the college scholarship winners.  “I consider that weekend of the NANPA conference, and spending the week with other members of my team working on a project as one of the defining moments of my photography career,” Andrew says.  Their project was to document Amelia Island off the coast of Jacksonville.  A number of pro photographers were with the students to give guidance and to make sure things went well.  “The presentation of our group was done at the 2013 summit, and this experience set the tone for how I wanted to guide my photography work,” he adds.

Continue reading