Costa Rica with Jeff Mauritzen and Steve Morello

Learn from two of the best nature photographers in one workshop! National Geographic Photographer Jeff Mauritzen & photographer Steve Morello will be instructing a one week workshop at Crocodile Bay Resort, located on the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica. Described by National Geographic, as one of “the most biologically intense paces on Earth”, the Osa Peninsula will offer us a chance to photograph all 4 species of monkeys that reside here, birds such as the Scarlet macaw and Chestnut-mandibled toucan, as well as a wealth of trees and poison dart frogs, snakes, turtles and of course, the beautiful rainforest!

Jeff and Steve have both led photo programs for National Geographic & Lindblad Expeditions all over the world, including many in Costa Rica. In our words, “We’ve set up this intensive wildlife photography workshop to bring you the best photo opportunities that Costa Rica has to offer.” Although we will have formal classroom instruction and feedback on your photos, the emphasis on teaching will be in the field, while we are on our excursions. This workshop is an opportunity to learn from two photographers who truly are experts in their field. Their combined experience covers every continent, every habitat, and years of working in the most difficult environments on the planet. Their experience will provide you with a once in a lifetime opportunity to hone your photo skills and learn from the best.

For more details please visit the photo workshop link included here.

Metamorphosis by Robin Moore

 

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Story and Photographs by Robin Moore

Metamorphosis spawned out of a conversation I had one day in early 2012 with conservationist Gabby Wild. We were discussing the difficulties of raising concern for the plight of the most threatened group of all vertebrates, the amphibians, and committed to concocting a publicity campaign. We wanted to do something different, something that would make people look twice, or see amphibians in a new light. A few months later, we were in a studio in Los Angeles decorating a body-painted Gabby with live frogs and newts.

In my time as an amphibian biologist and a photographer I have shot (with a camera) a lot of frogs, but this shoot was different. Rather than wading mosquito-riddled swamps or hacking through thick jungle to find and photograph elusive frogs in their natural habitat, I was bringing them into the controlled environment of a studio and shooting them against the canvas of the human body. In doing so, I had to learn a whole new way of shooting. Instead of finding or waiting for the right light, I had to craft my own, and instead of patiently waiting for the action to unfold in front of me, I had to conceptualize and create compositions around a theme. It was both testing and creatively invigorating.  Continue reading