Winter in Yellowstone with Juan Pons

“The Serengeti of North America”
Yellowstone has been called the Serengeti of North America and with good reason; it contains the largest concentration of free-roaming wildlife in the lower 48 states. The numbers are staggering, sixty-seven different mammals live here, including grizzly bears, black bears, gray wolves, wolverine, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, pronghorn, linx, elk, bison, moose, coyotes, foxes as well as other numerous small mammals.

Any description of Yellowstone will be filled with superlatives; First National Park in the world, greatest concentration of thermal features in the word, up until recently the largest National Park in the lower 48 states, home to the largest Bison herd in the world, and of course, it is home to, perhaps, the most famous geyser in the world, Old Faithful.

What sets my Yellowstone photo workshops apart
First know that I have been leading winter photo workshops in Yellowstone for 16 years, every year. In Yellowstone it is imperative that you have a guide that knows the park very well. Yellowstone is vast, and you need to know the trends in the animal behaviors to know where to find them and how to photograph them in the bets possible way.

I believe that in order to truly enjoy your time and get the most out of a photography tour and/or workshop you need to have small groups, and a very high ratio of instructors to participants. My Yellowstone workshops are very unique in that the group is very small, no more than 6 participants with 2 instructors, that is a 3:1 ratio! The reason our Yellowstone groups are so small is very simple, I want EVERY participant to have their own door and window out of the vehicles. This provides participants with the best opportunities to capture those images when speed is of the essence in exiting the vehicles and setting up or when it is necessary to shoot out of the window. Additionally I want to make sure you have plenty of room for your gear and warm clothing.

Compare that most other tours were you have one instructor and up to 14 participants in a single van, with no operable windows! With me you are assured to have the best vantage point at all times, and never be held back by sitting in an overcrowded van.

As a photo workshop leader I take my responsibilities seriously. I work closely with the National Parks and I always operate with all the proper insurance, permits and certifications. I am an Authorized Permittee of the Yellowstone National Park.

What you will learn
You will be accompanied by Juan, an accomplished professional photographer, and photographic educator who has a deep passion for the outdoors. I believe that the best way to teach is by demonstrating, and to this end, I will be shooting alongside you, demonstrating my vision, technique and sharing my love and knowledge of Yellowstone. However, my priority is always YOU, and helping you get the best images YOU can get. Additionally, I freely share my equipment with you in order to give you some “in-the-field” experience with some of the equipment you may have been thinking of acquiring.

The biggest advantage of having small groups is the flexibility they provide for customizing and adjusting both the schedule and agenda to suit the interests of the group while being able to maintain the flexibility required by variable weather. This allows us to cover only those topics that you are all interested in, including:

• How to create asthetically pleasing wildlife and landscape photographs
• Storytelling thru natural history photography
• Best use of equipment
• Digital Workflow
• Adobe Lightroom basics
• Image presentations and critiques

What to expect
My workshops are pretty intense, and as such you should not expect this to be a leisurely vacation. My goal is to capture the best images we can during our tour. What this means is that our days are long, typically starting before dawn and ending after sunset. However, we typically will take a long lunch to rest and recouperate.

Within 2 working days of registering for the workshop you will receive a confirmation email with a request for your deposit. Once I receive your deposit, I will email you a registration confirmation as well as the details you will need to book your airfare. I will then be emailing you periodically with any pertinent information about the workshop, including checklists for clothing and gear to bring.

About 6 to 8 weeks prior to the workshop, you then start hearing from us on a more regular basis. At that point I will provide you with detailed lodging and contact information, go over more details of the workshop and get you excited and thinking about the images you want to capture during the workshop. At this time you will also receive from us a list of recommended clothing, equipment and even discounts for equipment you may want to acquire for this once on a lifetime trip.

However, I am always available to answer any questions you may have leading up to the workshop.

What is Included
• All Lodging
• All Meals
• Ground transportation including private Snowcoach
• Snacks and water in the vehicles at all times
• All permits & fees
• Instruction
• Inspiration
• Camaraderie
• A great time

Winter in Yellowstone with Juan Pons

“The Serengeti of North America”
Yellowstone has been called the Serengeti of North America and with good reason; it contains the largest concentration of free-roaming wildlife in the lower 48 states. The numbers are staggering, sixty-seven different mammals live here, including grizzly bears, black bears, gray wolves, wolverine, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, pronghorn, linx, elk, bison, moose, coyotes, foxes as well as other numerous small mammals.

Any description of Yellowstone will be filled with superlatives; First National Park in the world, greatest concentration of thermal features in the word, up until recently the largest National Park in the lower 48 states, home to the largest Bison herd in the world, and of course, it is home to, perhaps, the most famous geyser in the world, Old Faithful.

What sets my Yellowstone photo workshops apart
First know that I have been leading winter photo workshops in Yellowstone for 16 years, every year. In Yellowstone it is imperative that you have a guide that knows the park very well. Yellowstone is vast, and you need to know the trends in the animal behaviors to know where to find them and how to photograph them in the bets possible way.

I believe that in order to truly enjoy your time and get the most out of a photography tour and/or workshop you need to have small groups, and a very high ratio of instructors to participants. My Yellowstone workshops are very unique in that the group is very small, no more than 6 participants with 2 instructors, that is a 3:1 ratio! The reason our Yellowstone groups are so small is very simple, I want EVERY participant to have their own door and window out of the vehicles. This provides participants with the best opportunities to capture those images when speed is of the essence in exiting the vehicles and setting up or when it is necessary to shoot out of the window. Additionally I want to make sure you have plenty of room for your gear and warm clothing.

Compare that most other tours were you have one instructor and up to 14 participants in a single van, with no operable windows! With me you are assured to have the best vantage point at all times, and never be held back by sitting in an overcrowded van.

As a photo workshop leader I take my responsibilities seriously. I work closely with the National Parks and I always operate with all the proper insurance, permits and certifications. I am an Authorized Permittee of the Yellowstone National Park.

What you will learn
You will be accompanied by Juan, an accomplished professional photographer, and photographic educator who has a deep passion for the outdoors. I believe that the best way to teach is by demonstrating, and to this end, I will be shooting alongside you, demonstrating my vision, technique and sharing my love and knowledge of Yellowstone. However, my priority is always YOU, and helping you get the best images YOU can get. Additionally, I freely share my equipment with you in order to give you some “in-the-field” experience with some of the equipment you may have been thinking of acquiring.

The biggest advantage of having small groups is the flexibility they provide for customizing and adjusting both the schedule and agenda to suit the interests of the group while being able to maintain the flexibility required by variable weather. This allows us to cover only those topics that you are all interested in, including:

• How to create asthetically pleasing wildlife and landscape photographs
• Storytelling thru natural history photography
• Best use of equipment
• Digital Workflow
• Adobe Lightroom basics
• Image presentations and critiques

What to expect
My workshops are pretty intense, and as such you should not expect this to be a leisurely vacation. My goal is to capture the best images we can during our tour. What this means is that our days are long, typically starting before dawn and ending after sunset. However, we typically will take a long lunch to rest and recouperate.

Within 2 working days of registering for the workshop you will receive a confirmation email with a request for your deposit. Once I receive your deposit, I will email you a registration confirmation as well as the details you will need to book your airfare. I will then be emailing you periodically with any pertinent information about the workshop, including checklists for clothing and gear to bring.

About 6 to 8 weeks prior to the workshop, you then start hearing from us on a more regular basis. At that point I will provide you with detailed lodging and contact information, go over more details of the workshop and get you excited and thinking about the images you want to capture during the workshop. At this time you will also receive from us a list of recommended clothing, equipment and even discounts for equipment you may want to acquire for this once on a lifetime trip.

However, I am always available to answer any questions you may have leading up to the workshop.

What is Included
• All Lodging
• All Meals
• Ground transportation including private Snowcoach
• Snacks and water in the vehicles at all times
• All permits & fees
• Instruction
• Inspiration
• Camaraderie
• A great time

Winter in Yellowstone with Daniel J. Cox

2019 Winter in Yellowstone Photography Tour – Photograph the “Winter Wonderland” of Yellowstone National Park in the comforts of a private luxury snow coach with wildlife photographer Daniel J. Cox.

Along the snowy trails, we’ll stop to photograph the beautiful landscapes and mountain vistas surrounded by steamy geysers, along with a variety of wildlife, including the majestic elk, mammoth bison, coyotes, swans, and bald eagles. These creatures, big and small, find warmth near many of the thermal areas, creating unique and stunning imagery. We’ve had some years with great wolf viewing and hope to have similar opportunities again in 2019.

Morgan Heim – Young Photographer Profile

Photographs by Morgan Heim

Interview by David C. Lester

Morgan Heim in the field. © Sara Thomas WWF

Morgan Heim is a full-time freelance nature and wildlife photographer who brings unparalleled intensity and compassion to her work.  The easiest way to appreciate this is to take a look at her website, morganheim.com and go through the projects she has tackled over the past eleven years.  From photographing the work of drug trafficking organizations (primarily the dismantling of their work by scientists and law enforcement agents) that run industrial-scale marijuana growing operations in California forests with an estimated value of $31 billion, and that have a terrible impact on the environment, to stopping along the road to memorialize animals that have been killed by motor vehicles, Morgan’s approach to conservation photography leaves a deep and contemplative impression on the viewer that doesn’t pass quickly.

While Morgan feels lucky to get to work steadily on projects, there is still a tremendous amount that she  wants to do.  “My overarching goal is to have the work that I do provide a meaningful contribution to conservation,” Morgan says.  “I’ve gotten a good start on a lot of things, but there’s a lot left to do, both on the projects I’ve already undertaken, as well as new projects in the future.  For example, fishing cats are still endangered, and a little money was raised to help them, but my work won’t save the fishing cat,” she says.  Morgan says that when she works on a project, she wants to be part of the process and part of the community.  She enjoys the journey and the challenge.  She’s not only excited about creating images, but how she is able to use them.

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NATURE’S VIEW: My favorite megafauna of all time

Story and photography by Jim Clark

Okay, here’s one for you:  What did the mama buffalo say to her little boy in the morning when he left to go to school? “Bison!”

I know, corny as all heck, but it’s the only joke I can remember. Besides, bison are my most favorite charismatic megafauna of all time. I can spend hours in Yellowstone’s Hayden or Lamar Valley just watching a herd of bison grazing, rutting, playing, swimming, running, wallowing or whatever; it doesn’t matter.

Bison graze near Slough Creek, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. © Jim Clark

Bison graze near Slough Creek, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. © Jim Clark

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Yellowstone Bison Story with Happy Ending

Story and photos by Kathy Lichtendahl

© Kathy Lichtendahl

© Kathy Lichtendahl

A couple days ago my husband and I were headed home from a meeting in Gardiner, Montana by taking the preferred shortcut through Yellowstone’s Lamar Valley. As we approached the confluence of the Soda and Lamar Rivers, we noticed two young bison standing on a small island in the middle of the rushing water. One of the youngsters plunged into the water in an attempt to cross the Soda and was quickly swept off his feet. A look of panic came over his face as he struggled to turn and regain his place on the island. Luckily for him, he was successful and he and his partner then crossed the wider and slightly safer Lamar to more solid ground. Continue reading