Costa Rica – Osa Peninsula with Steve Gettle and Nicole Sudduth

Traveling to Osa Peninsula is an adventure into the heart of wildlife abundance. Osa is the gem of Costa Rica. This area hosts the largest population of Scarlet Macaws in the country, all four species of monkeys, both species of sloths, Costa Rica’s largest remaining population of jaguars and tapirs, over 100 species of reptiles and a huge diversity of frogs. The colors and sounds will excite and amaze you as we spend our entire tour in this magical place.

National Geographic named Osa peninsula as one of the most incredibly biologically intense places on earth and we will be in the heart of it. We will begin at a 750-acre forest reserve at a point where the Gulfo Dulce meets the Pacific Ocean. We will then move down the coast until we are literally at the doorstep of Corcovado National Park, the largest lowland rainforest in Central America.

Osa is where the rainforest meets the sea. Explore lush gardens and hiking trails that take us from pristine beaches with tide pools to spring-fed rivers and waterfalls to rich rainforest jungle where monkeys howl. Imagine flocks of macaws, toucans, and parrots, coatis, kinkajous, agoutis, and sloths as daily visitors that we may have the opportunity to photograph.

This is a location where we have the chance to photograph all four species of Costa Rica’s monkeys: Capuchin, Spider, Mantled Howler, and the endangered Squirrel monkey.

More than 460 species of birds call this place home. Bird photographers will enjoy enormous variety of species that range from tropical rainforest birds to raptors to ocean and wetland species. In addition to Scarlet Macaws which the place is known for, we may see Red-capped Manakins, Blue-crowned manakins, Yellow-billed and Turquoise Cotingas, Tinamou, trogons, honeycreepers, Black-mandibled toucans, red-lored parrots, and so many more!

Macro is also fun in this area as we shoot subjects such as Leaf-Cutter Ants, Red-Eyed Tree Frogs and Poison Dart Frogs and other small creatures. Over 10,000 species of colorful and unique insects and over 100 species of reptiles and amphibians are found here.

Costa Rica with Steve Gettle and Nicole Sudduth

Costa Rica – The nature photographers’ paradise! There is so much wildlife here, that you won’t want to sleep for fear of missing an incredible photo opportunity. Seriously! Costa Rica is home to more than 800 bird species including a huge variety of Hummingbirds, the amazing Resplendent Quetzal, Toucans, Macaws, and the vibrant Honey Creepers and Tanagers.

Along with those beautiful birds, we will get up close and personal to photograph a wide variety of insects, lizards, snakes, and those brightly colored poison dart frogs.
As if that weren’t enough to keep those shutters clicking, we will see monkeys, sloths, and other mammals too!

A trip to Costa Rica certainly wouldn’t be complete without experiencing the exotic orchids and other unique flora of Costa Rica, along with the beautiful jungle scenery and picturesque landscapes.

As a nature photographer, it should not come as a surprise that Costa Rica is one of our favorite places in the world to photograph wildlife. We will take you to the best and most iconic locations for nature photography in all of Costa Rica!

Also for your enjoyment, we will be bringing our high-speed flash system for our participants to use while photographing hummingbirds in flight when we visit the cloud forest. You will walk away with breathtaking photographs of hummingbirds in flight that without this specialized equipment, would be impossible to do.

One important piece of advice should you decide to join us on this trip… Bring lots of memory cards, charged batteries, and a very large hard drive for all your images, because you will need it!

Metamorphosis by Robin Moore

 

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Story and Photographs by Robin Moore

Metamorphosis spawned out of a conversation I had one day in early 2012 with conservationist Gabby Wild. We were discussing the difficulties of raising concern for the plight of the most threatened group of all vertebrates, the amphibians, and committed to concocting a publicity campaign. We wanted to do something different, something that would make people look twice, or see amphibians in a new light. A few months later, we were in a studio in Los Angeles decorating a body-painted Gabby with live frogs and newts.

In my time as an amphibian biologist and a photographer I have shot (with a camera) a lot of frogs, but this shoot was different. Rather than wading mosquito-riddled swamps or hacking through thick jungle to find and photograph elusive frogs in their natural habitat, I was bringing them into the controlled environment of a studio and shooting them against the canvas of the human body. In doing so, I had to learn a whole new way of shooting. Instead of finding or waiting for the right light, I had to craft my own, and instead of patiently waiting for the action to unfold in front of me, I had to conceptualize and create compositions around a theme. It was both testing and creatively invigorating.  Continue reading