Digital Black and White Capture to Print with Mary Louise Ravese

Experience the full life cycle of black and white photography from selecting a subject, to shooting, editing and printing in this unique long-weekend workshop. In this hands-on workshop, Mary Louise will explain how to identify and pre-visualize scenes with strong black and white image potential. Participants will then spend a day practicing these techniques photographing at nature photography locations in the region and other unique items like antiques. Just on site at the 20-acre Mountain Lens training center there is a serene pond, a scenic waterfall, two footbridges, and a mile of trails along meandering creeks and a forested hillside. Then it’s on to the digital darkroom where Mary Louise will share her step-by-step approach for optimally converting images from color to black and white using Adobe’s Lightroom program. Joining Mary Louise in teaching will be master printer and Mountain Lens co-founder Jeff Miller, who will explain how to produce the best black and white photographic prints. Over the weekend in addition to photographing in the field, participants will work on editing their own images with input, guidance and feedback from Mary Louise and Jeff. The workshop culminates with each participant printing one of their images to take home.

$645 – $745

Take your Photography to the Max! – Online Class with Lewis Kemper

Lewis Kemper’s Master Class Take your Photography to the Max! – Online Class

Photography is not rocket science. There are no magic formulas for taking great images. All it takes is careful seeing, and a conscience effort to take advantage of light, color and composition to make a great picture. Once that picture is created, a good, strong working knowledge of how best to process the image to bring out all its potential is essential, and is what elevates a good picture, to a great picture.

I have been teaching photography and writing articles and books for over 45 years. I have taught online classes for many years, both at Betterphoto.com and the Arcanum. I am combining the techniques I have learned through all of my experiences to make this the best learning opportunity possible. We all have busy lives, nobody can take weeks off to study. But with this class you get ten lessons to complete in a five-month period.

Unlike other classes, in this class, there will be video lessons, assignments, live one-to-one reviews, group hang outs, unlimited Q&A, group review and group interaction. Not only will you have access to Lewis Kemper, but also, all the students will be able to see all the reviews and interact with each other, coaching, questioning and learning together as an enhanced group experience.

Lessons will be given out every two weeks and you have two weeks to watch the lessons and do the assignments, upload your images, get advice from fellow students and then finally present your work for a live screen share lesson review with the instructor. Reviews will average 15 – 30 minutes. That is up to 4.5 hours of indvidual review time per student! All reviews will be recorded and shared with the group, so you can see what took place with your fellow students and learn together. We will also schedule time to try (it is not always possible for everyone to attend) to have 3 group screen share meetings, where you can ask questions, meet each other and share ideas.

And the best part of the whole thing is we can be flexible; if you can’t get one lesson done in time, just make it up later as long as you complete all ten lessons in the five month period.

We will be using a Facebook social learning group for the platform (all reviews and group meetings will be private and only accessible to group members). You will need to have a Facebook account, to participate.

It is like taking a whole college semester at your own pace, when it’s convenient for you!

The goal, of this five-month course, is to learn to recognize and use light, color, and composition as elements of your designs. And then learning the skills to accentuate the star of your image, and compel and guide, your viewers eye throughout your image.

Ansel Adams used to say, “The negative is my score and the print is my performance.”

We are going to learn to properly use the tools of light, color and composition to create the perfect score and then use the tools of Adobe Camera Raw/Lightroom Develop module to create the perfect performance.

Click the link to see the whole class outline.

Instagram for Nature Photographers

Story and Photos by Greg Vaughn

NANPA-Instagram-profile-page

Fun facts about Instagram: as of January 2016, there were 400 million Instagrammers uploading over 80 million photos every day. The hugely popular social media platform may be best known as a favorite of fan-hungry celebrities and with those who want to quickly share a snap of their latest meal, but it is much more than that. Instagram has become a showcase for outstanding photography of all genres, including nature, wildlife and landscape. Continue reading

Making a Molehill out of a Mountain by Mitch Baltuch

An arctic ground squirrel posing in Denali National Park.  It is sitting surrounded by tundra vegetation at the height of fall color in late August. Photo by Mitch Baltuch.

An arctic ground squirrel posing in Denali National Park. It is sitting surrounded by tundra vegetation at the height of fall color in late August. Photo by Mitch Baltuch.

Text and Images by Mitch Baltuch

With the advent of digital photography, the proverbial shoebox moved from cardboard to silicon. The computer, or more correctly, the hard drive, became the shoebox. Along with this change came a significantly larger amount of images. The cost of film and processing no longer applied and everyone felt very comfortable in both shooting more images and using the high-frame rate capture setting on their camera. The result: a huge mountain of images. For many, this meant a mountain of chaos if they did not have a workable digital image management strategy.

Interestingly, with the advent of workflow-centric software tools, it is easier than ever to manage the images we capture and provide rapid, efficient search capabilities that allow us to find any image, for any purpose, in a very small amount of time. In addition, while not exactly fun, the job is no longer the mind-numbing, tedious task that it used to be.

To make a molehill out of the mountain that is digital image management, there are two requirements:

  • An image management workflow
  • A complimentary tool that allows one to efficiently perform that workflow

Continue reading

When Color Doesn’t Cut It by Lee Hoy

American Bison by Lee Hoy

American Bison by Lee Hoy

Text and Images by Lee Hoy

As a wildlife and landscape photographer, I am constantly amazed at the plethora of colors that even a tiny damselfly can exhibit. It is capturing the palette of nature’s colors that often lures us out of bed early each morning, but what do we do when color just doesn’t cut it? What about when we are trying to communicate texture, form, grandeur, or movement and color becomes a distraction?

As a young boy, my parents would take me to the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma where I was captivated by a giant woolly beast that embodied the American west. I have photographed the American bison on many occasions and often find color images to be disappointing. It was only after I bought Silver Effex Pro 2.0 and began to learn its capabilities that I realized black-and-white images were the ticket to revealing to others what drew me to bison in the first place. The deep crevices in the shaggy coat, the splintering of the tips of the horns, the soulfulness of the eyes, and the jagged wrinkles in their hindquarters were expertly represented through black-and-white. Continue reading

PHOTOGRAPHER PROJECT: Painting with Light by Ralph A. Clevenger

Story and photographs by Ralph A. Clevenger ©

RAC_130227_004Photographically painting with light has been around for about 100 years. It was made popular by distinguished photographers Man Ray and Barbara Morgan in the 1930s and 1940s. Photographer and inventor Aaron Jones was a master of the hosemaster light painting system and brought the technique into the commercial photography world in the 1980s (see http://aaronjonesphoto.com/). Personally, I’ve been fascinated by it ever since seeing O. Winston Link’s steam locomotive images from the 1950s. Continue reading