How NANPA’s High School Scholarship Program Impacted Me: A Turning Point

Owl on alert in the forest.

Owl on alert in the forest.

Story and photos by Ashleigh Scully

I was a participant in the 2017 NANPA High School Scholarship Program and spent a week in the Great Smoky Mountains working with some incredible mentors, broadening my interests in photography and learning from some very talented kids my age as well. This program was a turning point for me–it showed me just how much I want to inspire the younger generation to learn more about conservation and photography. Working with and learning from 9 other students from across the country was not what I expected it to be. I had assumed we would all stick to the certain aspects of photography we were comfortable with, but instead we all motivated each other to try a little bit of everything. During that week in the Smokies, I got to experiment with flash and night photography and use some of the cameras, lenses, and flashes that Canon sent to as loaners. I now have knowledge of the settings to use for star and night photography, something that will definitely come in handy for me in the future. We also hiked out to a waterfall and attempted slow motion waterfall photos to capture the blur of the water. Using the loaner flashes, we also found little salamanders and toads and used white backgrounds for the “Meet Your Neighbors” technique that  Andrew Snyder, one of the mentors, taught us. Some of the kids were so in love with this new technique, it was all they did!

Do you know a talented young nature photographer? NANPA’s High School Scholarship Program is seeking 10 high school student photographers to attend a five-day field event where they can learn from the industry’s top shooters. Apply now for this immersive, hands-on education program to be held in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park July 6–11, 2020. Combining classroom and field-based instruction, students will have the chance to improve their nature photography skills, learn about NANPA, meet industry professionals, and gain an appreciation of the Smoky Mountains’ rich natural history. The NANPA Foundation funds this and other educational programs. January 31, 2020 is the last day to apply, so don’t wait. Apply now! This article was originally published in January, 2019.

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A Day of Service

Volunteers cleaning a beach. Photo by Brian Yurasits on Unsplash.
Volunteers cleaning a beach. Photo by Brian Yurasits on Unsplash.

The next time you’re out in the wild, enjoying our parks and state and federal lands, spend a moment in gratitude for the often unseen and unglamorous work that makes your visit possible. And it might just be one of your friends or neighbors you have to thank for the smooth trails you walk or the trash-free landscape you photograph. The National Park Service, with an unfunded maintenance backlog of almost $12 billion, relies on a lot of volunteers to maintain trails and help make visitors’ experience pleasant. Many state and local parks are also chronically underfunded and reliant on volunteers.

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Weekly Wow! Week of January 20, 2020

Showcase 2020 Top 100 winner: " Atlantic Puffin Working in the Rain, Scotland, UK " © Sunil Gopalan.
Showcase 2020 Top 100 winner: ” Atlantic Puffin Working in the Rain, Scotland, UK ” © Sunil Gopalan.

All of this week’s Weekly Wow! images can be seen in the slideshow on the NANPA homepage at nanpa.org.

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, January 20, 2020.  To view all of the top 250 photographs from NANPA’s 2020 Showcase competition, see the photo gallery on the NANPA website. The 2020 edition of Expressions contains all of the top 250 photos from the Showcase competition as well as interesting and insightful articles. Order your copy here!

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Getting the Most From Your Long Lens: A NANPA Webinar

Sandhill Cranes flying together © Bob Coates.
Sandhill Cranes © Bob Coates.

You have a long telephoto lens or you’re lusting after one. There’s nothing like that long reach to zoom in on birds and wildlife. But telephotos are not the easiest things to use and the longer the reach the more precise you have to be. Are you using your long glass to its full potential? Find out how you can squeeze all the possibilities (and then some) out of you long lenses in a NANPA webinar presented by Bob Coates on Thursday, February 13, at 6:00pm EST.

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Finding Community in NANPA

Sunset over water. Photo by Mark Kreider.
Photo by Mark Kreider.

Story and photos by Mark Kreider

I have been a NANPA member for a year and a half. Even in that short time, NANPA and its supportive community have influenced me in many meaningful ways. Life seems to be full of wonderful flukes, and my introduction to NANPA was one such instance. One morning in November of 2012, when I was a high school senior, I received word from a fellow photographer of a great photographic opportunity that existed for high school students. Though just three days away from the deadline of NANPA’s High School Scholarship Program application, I immediately jumped at the opportunity. I quite honestly remember thinking it looked too good to be true – a chance to spend a week in the field and at the NANPA Annual Summit, all the while learning and being inspired. I wondered to myself a little incredulously, How could I not have heard of NANPA before? It looks awesome!

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Weekly Wow! Week of January 13, 2020

Showcase 2020 Top 100 winner: "Star Trails Over Mono Lake, Mono Lake, Eastern Sierra California © Alice Cahill.
Showcase 2020 Top 100 winner: “Star Trails Over Mono Lake, Mono Lake, Eastern Sierra California © Alice Cahill.

All of this week’s Weekly Wow! images can be seen in the slideshow on the NANPA homepage at nanpa.org.

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, January 13, 2020.  To view all of the top 250 photographs from NANPA’s 2020 Showcase competition, see the photo gallery on the NANPA website. The 2020 edition of Expressions contains all of the top 250 photos from the Showcase competition as well as interesting and insightful articles. Pre-order your copy by January 17 and save $5!

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Obituary: Walt Anderson

Walt Anderson. Photo by Don Carter.
Walt Anderson. Photo by Don Carter.

Story and Don Carter

NANPA has just lost a great member and friend, Walt Anderson. Walt passed away on December 20, one day short of his 71st birthday.

Walt was the founder of Visual Echoes, Inc., which produced and sold the “Better Beamer” flash extender and the Panning Plate. He loved to share his knowledge of the use of flash with his Sunshine in your Pocket program and his thoughts on the ethical use of a flash with wildlife. He was also a great photographer and loved to travel: Florida for birds, the Smoky Mountains and the southwest for landscapes, and of course Yellowstone.

Walt was widely published and received many awards, what I will remember about him the most, was his sweet tooth. He never turned down the opportunity for a good chocolate donut or a piece of pie. If we were not traveling together, I would always consult Walt for some of his favorite locations to photograph in the areas where I would be, he would always start the conversation with the locations of the best donut shops.

Walt loved to be part of the NANPA community. He attended most of all the Summits, led a few NANPA Regional Events and helped with the college scholarship students as a mentor. He will be missed by the photography community. Walt is survived by his wife of 38 years, Carol.

Rest well my friend,

Don

Don Carter currently serves as NANPA’s Vice President, and is a past president. He is a retired university professor who takes photographs full time while traveling the country with his wife and springer spaniel in their RV.

Photographing Gateway Arch National Park

The Gateway Arch rises majestically 630 feet over St. Louis and the Mississippi River in Gateway Arch National Park, MO.
The Gateway Arch rises majestically 630 feet over St. Louis and the Mississippi River in Gateway Arch National Park, MO.

Story and photos by Jerry Ginsberg

One of the nation’s newest National Parks is a tiny speck of land on the west bank of the mighty Mississippi River. At a mere 91 acres, Gateway Arch National Park is by far the smallest of our sixty-one National Parks.

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Photographing Roses in Colonial Park

A single rose with water droplets.
Rudolf W. van der Goot Rose Garden, Colonial Park, Somerset, NJ.

Story and photos by Sastry Karra

The rose garden inside the Colonial Park in Somerset, New Jersey, is named in honor of Rudolf W. van der Goot, the first horticulturist with the County Park Commission, as a tribute to his efforts in designing and developing the garden. It is only one acre in size but contains more than 3,000 roses covering 325 varieties. From late spring through fall, these roses present an unending variety of colors, fragrances and, above all, appearances.

Photographing roses also presents unending opportunities, especially after a rainy night or while it is drizzling. The park being very close to my home, I visit often.  Recently, I went once while it was drizzling and again on a bright sunny day.

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Weekly Wow! Week of January 6, 2020

Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: "Dueling Bats Spar Over Night Nectar, Costa Rica" © Karen Leperi.
Showcase 2019 Top 100 winner: “Dueling Bats Spar Over Night Nectar, Costa Rica” © Karen Leperi.

All of this week’s Weekly Wow! images can be seen in the slideshow on the NANPA homepage at nanpa.org.

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, January 6, 2020.  To view all of the top 250 photographs from NANPA’s 2019 Showcase competition, see the photo gallery on the NANPA website. 

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