Mysterious Bird Disease Disappears but Threats Persist

Screenshot of Audubon article about the bird disease disappearing.
Screenshot of Audubon article.

By Frank Gallagher, NANPA Blog Coordinator

Earlier this year, birds started coming down with swollen eyes and “crusty discharges,” neurological symptoms, and blindness which all too often led to death. The disease spread quickly through 11 mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes states, as far south as Florida and as far west as Indiana, prompting state wildlife agencies and Audubon chapters to urge people to take down feeders. Bodies of dead birds were sent to labs for analysis, hoping to pinpoint the pathogen responsible. To date, there has been no firm diagnosis. As the summer ended, so did reports of ill birds. Just as swiftly and mysteriously as it started, so this disease seems to be abating.

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Finding Rare Species during a BioBlitz

Photo of an alligator or caiman head above the water looking at the camera.. Something was observing me back. © Judd Patterson
Something was observing me back. © Judd Patterson

By Frank Gallagher, NANPA Blog Coordinator

A BioBlitz is a great opportunity to get out into nature and observe all the species of plants and animals (and fungi) that inhabit an area, whether that’s a local park or meadow or someplace you have traveled. During a BioBlitz, participants observe, photograph, and upload their observations to iNaturalist. During NANPA’s recent Nature Photography Day BioBlitz, more than 9,000 observations were logged, covering more than 3,000 species, 97 of which were threatened. The date contributed by participants becomes available to scientists and researchers—a true citizen-science project. We’ve profiled several participants (here, here, and here) already. Today, we turn our attention to Judd Patterson, who works for the National Park Service and pursues nature photography in his spare time. He logged observations of several rare and/or threatened species.

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Making a Living as a Nature Photographer 2021 Part II

Photo of Jack Graham teaching other photographers at a location workshop in the desert, with mountains in the background.
Teaching at a location workshop.

By Jack Graham

In part one of this article, I covered some of the training and skills needed to become a professional nature photographer, gave some tips about marketing, and explored the various income streams available. If you haven’t already, it’s worth going back and starting there. Once you’ve absorbed part one, it’s time to dive into part two.

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Making a Living as a Nature Photographer 2021, Part I

Photo of Jack Graham teaching other photographers at a location workshop in the desert, with mountains in the background.
Teaching at a location workshop.

By Jack Graham

A few years back I authored an article about making a living as a nature photographer. It has been widely read, shared, and remains quite popular. Over the intervening 6 years or so, , the photography industry and the way we make our living has changed tremendously. It is time to do an update.

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New Copyright Grab … by a Museum

MoMA Photo Club

By Frank Gallagher, NANPA Blog Coordinator

We’ve written many times about copyright issues that NANPA’s Advocacy Committee, chaired by Jane Halperin and assisted by Sean Fitzgerald, is following and the actions NANPA has taken to protect the intellectual property rights of photographers. Yet another troubling example has surfaced of an initiative that tramples on photographers rights and, this time, from a surprising source: the Museum of Modern Art in New York, also known as MoMA.

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Conservation Kids

Photo of a group of young conservation photographers in the making on a Conservation Kids outing. © Daniel Dietrich
A group of young conservation photographers in the making on a Conservation Kids outing. © Daniel Dietrich

By Frank Gallagher, NANPA Blog Coordinator

Today’s young people will become tomorrow’s conservationists and nature photographers if, and maybe only if, they are able to get out and experience the wonders of nature. They’ll be the ones whose dollars keep camera companies innovating, whose votes protect the wild and beautiful, and whose vision and aesthetics take photography in exciting new directions if they learn to appreciate our precious natural world. But too many young people don’t have easy access to wild places and aren’t getting the transformative experiences that will inspire them to take up the challenges of documenting, advocating for, and protecting nature. That dilemma inspired Daniel Dietrich to create Conservation Kids.

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Big Changes for Commercial Film Permits

Shadows of photographers and badlands, Twenty Mule Team Canyon, Death Valley National Park, California. © Sean Fitzgerald
Shadows of photographers and badlands, Twenty Mule Team Canyon, Death Valley National Park, California. © Sean Fitzgerald

By Sean Fitzgerald, Co-Chair of NANPA Advocacy Committee

If you mention the topic of commercial film permits to most professional photographers, the response may range from an irritated growl to a wall of invective that would make a sailor blush. And for good reason, too. The statutes and regulations governing when a photographer needs a commercial permit are confusing at best and vary depending on factors such as whether or not the activity involves stills or video, is considered commercial filming, uses props, sets or models, and more. They are sometimes even prone to inconsistent and arbitrary application and even abuse when applied by park rangers and administrators in the real world

For those reasons, NANPA has long advocated for reform and simplification of the commercial film and still photography permit laws and regulations.

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Young Photographers to Follow: Justina Martelli

Photo of mother bird flying down to branch where her young are waiting © Justina Martelli
I vividly remember encountering these six young barn swallows under the blue skies of Ithaca, New York. The cattails that surrounded the pond were dancing with the wind. In a heartbeat, a pair of majestic wings crashed into the scene, causing a beautiful blur of rusty orange feathers. It was the curious eyes twinkling under the sun through the parent’s perspective, as it dove and kissed its young ones, regurgitating the wings of a crunchy blue damselfly. In another heartbeat, she was gone. The younglings fluffed and stretched as they smirked at their own begging performances. Now and then, they would turn to look at me in wonder. This moment was among the greatest photography experiences of my life. © Justina Martelli

Interviewed by Frank Gallagher, NANPA Blog Coordinator

Like most of us, Justina Martelli was not expecting 2020 to turn out like it has. She had been chosen as one of NANPA Foundation’s High School Scholarship Program participants and was looking forward to a week at the Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont, immersed in nature photography with NANPA instructors and other participants. Instead, the coronavirus outbreak forced the cancellation of that event. Justina did not let the global pandemic stop her from achieving her goals.

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Weekly Wow! Week of November 23, 2020

Showcase 2020 Top 100 Winner: “Rialto Beach Sunset, Olympic Peninsula, Washington” © Don Larkin
Showcase 2020 Top 100 Winner: “Rialto Beach Sunset, Olympic Peninsula, Washington” © Don Larkin

All of this week’s Weekly Wow! images can be seen in the slideshow on the NANPA homepage at nanpa.org.

The following Showcase images have been selected to appear on the NANPA home page for the week beginning Monday, November 16, 2020.  To view all of the top 250 photographs from NANPA’s 2020 Showcase competition, see the photo gallery on the NANPA website. The 2020 edition of Expressions contains all of the top 250 photos from the Showcase competition as well as interesting and insightful articles. Order your copy here!

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Young Photographers to Follow: Ryan Reynolds

Interviewed by Frank Gallagher, NANPA Blog Coordinator

Ryan Reynolds has lived in South Korea, Thailand, and Ukraine (his parents work for the US State Department). Currently, he’s back in the US and attending the University of Portland. His photography journey began when he was nine years old and living in South Korea. He had a little point-and-shoot camera and used to take photos walking home from soccer practice just outside an army base there. He loved framing helicopters above apartment buildings as the sun set.

Photo of helicopters flying over Seoul skyline at dusk. “Sunset in Seoul” - South Korea, 2013 © Ryan Reynolds
“Sunset in Seoul” – South Korea, 2013 © Ryan Reynolds

Ryan’s grandparents are both landscape and wildlife photographers and he’s always been fascinated by the images they create. His initial interest in photography comes partly from them and partly from his life-long interest in and enjoyment of nature. At first, getting outside was the draw and photography was a byproduct. Now, photography is a reason to go out into nature. “Almost every weekend, I’m out with my photography friends,” he says. “I do it because I love it.” Ryan enjoys most genres of photography, but his favorite images to make are long-exposure shots at night, when he does light painting or takes pictures of the stars.

“Polaris” - A single 20 minute exposure centered on the north star © Ryan Reynolds
“Polaris” – A single 20 minute exposure centered on the north star © Ryan Reynolds

He really got into photography while in Ukraine. He took photography courses, watched a lot of YouTube videos on photography techniques and started doing photography for his school yearbook. He also had the opportunity to photograph concerts at a large performance hall and some of his photos were chosen for exhibitions in Kyiv. Eventually, he branched out and started making portraits, starting a small portrait and event photography business. Ryan’s most meaningful memory in Ukraine occurred while he was a Boy Scout there. A part of attaining the rank of Eagle Scout is to plan, develop, and lead a service project. Ryan’s project was doing family photo shoots of internally-displaced persons who had fled their homes in eastern Ukraine during the conflict between the government in Kyiv and Russian-backed separatists. He had to raise funds for printing and framing the photos and arrange visits to places where the refugees were learning English. Ryan says that it hardly felt like work because he was helping people and doing what he enjoyed. It was really moving to see the families’ reactions when he delivered the framed photos.

Backlit photo of young man playing a guitar in concert. “The Guitarist” - Taken at a Scream Inc. concert in Kyiv, Ukraine © Ryan Reynolds
“The Guitarist” – Taken at a Scream Inc. concert in Kyiv, Ukraine © Ryan Reynolds

His times in Asia rank among his favorite. “It’s just amazing there,” he says. “I have to go back.” He told us about one particularly memorable experience during a camping trip in Chiang Mai, Thailand, when he stumbled upon a hidden canyon. He had been out hiking when he leaned up against a tree and his hand was immediately covered by a swarm of weaver ants. He jumped, lost his footing, and slid/ran/stumbled down the side of a hill into this canyon. “It was midday and the bright light made visible every small sapling, every thriving piece of carpet moss, every leaf. I was surrounded by vivid shades of greens and browns. It was like I was in the midst of a painting.”

Today, the coronavirus continues to disrupt Ryan’s plans. He had hoped to earn some extra income while in college by running a small event and portrait business, but the pandemic has made that difficult. He did, however, land a job as a photographer for the university newspaper. Ryan has also gotten several chances to explore and photograph different parts of Oregon.

A view of Mt. Hood from Trillium Lake (left). Sunset at Yaquina Head Lighthouse (right). © Ryan Reynolds
A view of Mt. Hood from Trillium Lake (left). Sunset at Yaquina Head Lighthouse (right). © Ryan Reynolds

At the University of Portland, he’s an Environmental Science major hoping to eventually work in ecological research and conservation. Ryan is also in the Army ROTC program and expects to go into the army after college. Will photography continue to be important? Ryan says, “I hope it’s more than just a hobby. I definitely think I’ll always be interested in and passionate about photography.”

To see more of Ryan’s photos, follow him on Instagram @theryan_reynolds or Facebook at theryanreynolds