Winter in Yellowstone with Daniel J. Cox

2019 Winter in Yellowstone Photography Tour – Photograph the “Winter Wonderland” of Yellowstone National Park in the comforts of a private luxury snow coach with wildlife photographer Daniel J. Cox.

Along the snowy trails, we’ll stop to photograph the beautiful landscapes and mountain vistas surrounded by steamy geysers, along with a variety of wildlife, including the majestic elk, mammoth bison, coyotes, swans, and bald eagles. These creatures, big and small, find warmth near many of the thermal areas, creating unique and stunning imagery. We’ve had some years with great wolf viewing and hope to have similar opportunities again in 2019.

Glacier National Park with Tom Mace

This unique National Park offers endless sunrise and sunset opportunities; whether backdropped against a mountain range, reflections on water, or sunrise in an open field of elk it is truly awe inspiring. There is an abundance of wildlife throughout the park; Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goats, Elk, Moose, Bears (Black and Grizzly), Deer, and Birds to name a few. If you are looking to learn both landscape and wildlife photography, this may be one of the best places in America to achieve both. Not only are your group leaders experts in photographing and navigating these magnificent landmarks; they pride themselves on maintaining and respecting the natural environment of all parks they visit.

This is an all inclusive workshop. All workshops, ground transportation, hotel, meals, fees, and the little things are included in the price.

Grand Teton National Park with Andrew Slaton

Grand Teton is one of the best national parks for landscapes and wildlife, so on this exciting workshop, we will focus on several iconic locations, but we will also discuss the use of filtration, and post processing, and if possible, we will shoot night landscapes & star pictures. Summer is a great time of year in the Tetons, because the temps are warm, animals abound, wildflowers flourish, and summer storms create dynamic light and incredible cloud drama.

Grand Teton National Park with Tom Mace

The Grand Tetons is a photographer’s playground. From capturing the abundant wildlife to the magnificent landscapes with the Tetons as your backdrop, our clients will have ample opportunity to explore everything this amazing National Park offers. We plan several trips to the Grand Tetons each year during Spring, Summer, and Fall as the park offers many unique perspectives as the seasons change. Our Spring Trips focus on the babies born during late winter and early spring. Bears, Bison, Elk, Moose, and many other animals present their new family members in spring, and May is one of the best times to safely photograph mothers and their young. The landscape is also quickly transforming from snow pack to rising rivers, green fields, and flowers blanket the valley. Based on the time of year, we know the specific locations animals frequent throughout the park and we get you safely in position to seize the opportunity of photographing nature at its finest. Not only are your group leaders experts in photographing and navigating these magnificent landmarks; they pride themselves on maintaining and respecting the natural environment of all parks they visit

This is an all inclusive photography workshop. All workshops, ground transportation, hotel, meals, fees, and the little things are included in the price.

Great Smoky Mountains Spring with John Slonina

Great Smoky Mountains Spring

Majestic waterfalls, streams, wildflowers, mountain ranges, reflections. Home to black bears, turkey, elk, and deer and many other surprises.

This is the height of spring. We usually photograph several black bears.

This workshop is led by professional nature photographer John Slonina who has been leading tours there for several years.
Authorized permittee of the national park.

Small Group Size

Transportation Provided from Hotel to Field Locations. You do not have to rent a car.

All skill levels

John Slonina
Slonina Photography
Email: jtslonina@aol.com
Phone: 508-736-1167
http://www.sphotography.com

Channel Islands National Park – America’s Galapagos

Story and Photography by Jerry Ginsberg

 

Camping on Anacapa will allow you to capture a great sunrise from spectacular Inspiration Point at the island’s east end.  © Jerry Ginsberg

                               
We are accustomed to driving to our national parks. This is definitely not the case with Channel Islands National Park. This little archipelago of a half-dozen rocks jutting out of the Pacific Ocean a few miles off the coast of central California is reachable only by a short boat ride. This rather contradictory blend of remoteness and accessibility offers some unique opportunities for us photographers.

The Channel Islands are called America’s Galapagos – and for good reason. A wide variety of birds and pinnipeds are in plentiful supply. Western gulls find safety here. Continue reading

NATIONAL PARKS: Wrangell-St. Elias National Park

Story and photography by Jerry Ginsberg

Towering Wrangell Mountains in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, Alaska.

The Wrangell and St. Elias mountain ranges contain some of the largest volcanoes in North America. © Jerry Ginsberg

Ever wonder which of our 59 national parks is really the biggest? No, it’s not mighty Yellowstone or even sprawling Death Valley. Measuring a vast 13,200,000 acres, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, tucked into the southeast corner of Alaska, is far and away the biggest national park around, equal to six Yellowstones! It is larger than Massachusetts and New Hampshire combined, and includes two entire mountain ranges – the Wrangells and the St. Elias. Together with contiguous Kluane National Park across the border in Canada, the combined cross-border tract totals more than a whopping 25,000,000 acres and is the biggest wilderness area in the world.

While size does indeed matter, there is more to this sprawling wilderness than volume. Stunning peaks such as Sanford, Drum, Blackburn, Wrangell, St. Elias and others fill this rugged park. Continue reading

Autumn in Yellowstone

Story and photography by D. Robert Franz

© D. Robert Franz

© D. Robert Franz

Autumn,  (The Quiet Season). Yellowstone, the world’s first national park, holds an endless fascination for travelers from all over the world and for good reason. With its unrivaled natural geologic wonders and abundant wildlife the park is a magnet for people seeking adventure. The crowds pose a bit of a problem for nature photographers, who generally prefer to pursue their passion with a bit more solitude. Continue reading

Shenandoah National Park

Story and photography by Jerry Ginsberg

In addition to my usual narrative on a particular park, this month I would like to make a special mention of the centennial celebration of the National Park Service. (See https://www.nps.gov/subjects/centennial/index.htm.) There is no time like the present to get out and spend some time in one of America’s most special places. So pack your gear and visit a national park! Or, two.

Hawksbill Summit

Hawksbill Summit © Jerry Ginsberg

Now let’s jump into Shenandoah National Park.

Among the premier drives located east of the Mississippi, the 105-mile-long Skyline Drive is certainly one of them. This great road runs across the top of the Blue Ridge above the Shenandoah Valley. The views along its route are so majestic that many folks would be drawn here just for the ride, even if this were not Shenandoah National Park.

The northern end of the drive begins at Front Royal, Virginia, near the junction of Interstates 66 and 81. Its southern terminus connects with the north end of the famed 469-mile Blue Ridge Parkway. In between are several entrances to the park and many scenic stops and trailheads. Continue reading

Capitol Reef National Park

Story and photography by Jerry Ginsberg

Waterpocket Fold is Capitol Reef's hallmark geological feature.

Waterpocket Fold is Capitol Reef’s hallmark geological feature.

Wonderfully scenic and filled with dramatic and seemingly endless red rock, Utah boasts five national parks within its borders. Least well-known among these is long-and-narrow Capitol Reef National Park found just about smack in the middle of the state.

As is the case with many places in Utah, nineteenth-century Mormon pioneers settled here for a while and then moved on. In their wake, they left behind many remnants. As you drive the short piece of Route 24 that traverses this desert park you will see evidence of the Mormons in the wonderfully preserved one-room schoolhouse and apple and peach orchards that once marked the small Fruita settlement.

Continue reading