Wind River Bighorns with Sandy Zelasko

Join the National Bighorn Sheep Center and professional photographer Sandy Zelasko for a day of winter bighorn sheep photography in the Whiskey Basin of the Wind River Mountain Range.

Improve your overall knowledge of one of the largest wintering wild sheep herds in North America while fine tuning your photographic skills in winter environments. Learn why depth of field is an important tool when photographing wildlife and conquer exposure in snow conditions. Never be fooled by your camera’s metering system again!

Transportation to all viewing spots is included in the cost of the workshop. Bagged lunch is available for an additional fee.

Joshua Tree NP with Margo Taussig Pinkerton

We are returning to the park where its nearly 800,000 acres have seen human habitation for at least 5,000 years. From the earliest-known Pinto Culture to the ranchers, miners, and homesteaders of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, there is a wealth of archeological and historic sites protected by the park. Not only are there the iconic park namesakes, the Joshua trees, but there are wonderful rock formations created by early volcanic and tectonic action and sculpted by erosion. This is a location where the light creates all sorts of surprises and patterns, and you will find plenty to photograph ….

With workshops limited to 12 participants (a maximum 6:1 ratio, students to instructors), you can be assured of nearly as much one-one time as you want/need. We also welcome those whom we affectionately call our “Spousal Units,” those spouses and SOs who return so often to our workshops.

More details. Discount to NANPA members

“Bosque Wildlife” at Bosque del Apache NWR with Sandy Zelasko and Irene Hinke-Sacilotto

Situated along the Rio Grande River, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge covers more than 57,000 acres and is a major wintering ground for cranes and waterfowl. Refuge personnel manage the water levels of its wetlands and impoundments to simulate what was once the seasonal flow of water from the Rio Grande before the river was damned and the flow altered. To feed the huge number of birds visiting the refuge each year, nearby fields are planted with corn, winter wheat, millet, and other grains. Loop roads transect the refuge marshes and fields and provide prime sites for wildlife viewing and photography. Species that may be seen include shovelers, buffleheads, pintails, teal and other ducks; bald and golden eagles; kestrels and other hawks; turkey; meadowlarks; quail; roadrunners; coyotes; mule deer; and more. In November, large flocks of snow geese and sandhill cranes will be present. At night to escape predators, the birds flock to the marshes and shallow pools. With dawn, the snow geese and other waterfowl rise in mass from the wetlands and sweep overhead on their way to nearby fields to feed. Each day we will spend the early morning and late afternoon hours at the refuge photographing birds and many other species of wildlife which are present at the sanctuary.

Your Support is Needed

Why NANPA is supporting a copyright small claims tribunal and why you should too

by Jane Halperin, NANPA Advocacy Committee

Let’s face it, the current U.S. copyright system does not work for the majority of photographers who  operate as individuals or small business owners for a variety of reasons, including the complexity of registration. But perhaps the most significant reason is due to the inability of photographers whose work product is not low volume/ high value to enforce their ownership rights against infringers.

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From the Executive Director- Susan Day

Susan Day- NANPA Executive Director

 

A few years ago, NANPA adopted the tagline, “Connecting the Nature Photography Community,” and as I drafted this month’s article I thought about the many “connection” opportunities available within NANPA. Here are just a few:

Based on feedback from surveys and comments from you, NANPA developed a new meeting format for off-summit years. You asked for less time in meeting rooms and more time outside to photograph and hang out with fellow photographers. You asked for a less expensive venue in a gorgeous location with economical lodging options. NANPA listened — and registration opened recently for our 2018 Jackson Nature Photography Celebration. Instead of being in a giant hotel/convention center, you’ll pick your own lodging (we negotiated some great rates in several hotels—plus you’ll find plenty of campgrounds nearby.)  We will meet from May 20-22, 2018 at the Center for the Arts in Jackson, Wyoming to learn, share, connect, and celebrate! Each day will follow a different theme—the State and Future of Photography and Yellowstone’s Ecosystem—and we’ll celebrate nature and photography at keynote presentations, educational sessions, Lightning Talks, a Photo Gallery Crawl, and a new vendor format where you can check out and test equipment outside. Our keynote speakers are Rick Sammon, Henry Holdsworth, Dan Cox, and Geoff York who will inspire us to stretch our creativity. Continue reading

From the President- Don Carter

Don Carter- NANPA President

As we all know, wildlife photography can provide us with some great stories and, perhaps, some moments of embarrassment. Here is one of those moments that happened to my good friend Walt and me.

Sweetwater Wetlands Park is a small 60-acre park on the west side of Tucson. It is known for its multitude of bird species including the Belted Kingfisher, Gila Woodpecker, hawks, falcons and, of course, Coots galore. Sweetwater’s wonderful birding opportunities aside, we had come to find it’s somewhat elusive bobcat (Lynx Rufus). On a crystal clear Wednesday morning, Walt and Carol Anderson (Mr. and Mrs. Better Beamer Flash Extender) and I started our search. While several friends had seen the bobcat, I had not had the opportunity to photograph the beautiful animal and I wanted this disappointing streak to end. Continue reading

Outer Banks Lighthouses with Margo Taussig Pinkerton

The Outer Banks are a long, thin strip of barrier islands that protect the North Carolina Coast. Preserved to a large extent by the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, it is a visual feast of historic lighthouses spaced between long stretches of wild beaches and pristine sand dunes. The Outer Banks are part of our own back yard that we know so well, and we will go to great locations where you can seek your own vision and make wonderful photographs …

With workshops limited to 12 participants (a maximum 6:1 ratio, students to instructors), you can be assured of nearly as much one-one time as you want/need. We also welcome those whom we affectionately call our “Spousal Units,” those spouses and SOs who return so often to our workshops.

More details. Discount for NANPA members.

 

Five great tips Galen Rowell taught me

Story and photographs by Gary Crabbe

Editor’s note: On October 31 the photo gallery founded by Galen Rowell and lovingly managed by his wife Barbara Rowell called Mountain Light will close. The Rowells died 15 years ago in a plane crash near their hometown of Bishop, California, while returning from a photography workshop in Alaska. Author Gary Crabbe’s first real job was as a manager of Rowell’s 400,000-photo library for nine years. Now a successful photographer living near San Francisco, he offers five things he learned from Rowell that helped boost his career from amateur to professional.

It was 15 years ago last August that internationally renowned photographer Galen Rowell and his wife, Barbara, perished in a plane crash near their hometown in Bishop, California. They were on the very last leg of a long return voyage home after teaching a workshop in the Arctic. In a moment, we lost one of the best-known photographers who helped pioneer the genres of climbing and adventure travel photography and helped to elevate the genre of landscape photography with what he called the “dynamic landscape.” Continue reading

From the Executive Director- Susan Day

Susan Day- NANPA Executive Director

Do you register your photos with the US. Copyright Office? Most photographers don’t, which is a shame, because if your work is ever used without your permission, your chances of compensation are reduced—or unlikely—for unregistered work. One of the main reasons photographers and artists don’t register their images is because it’s a lot of work and takes a lot of time.

NANPA has been involved with a visual artists’ coalition for approximately 20 years, and two of their ongoing goals have been streamlining the copyright registration process and in recent years, developing a process for small claims filing for copyright violations. Continue reading