Assateague Island with Irene Hinke-Sacilotto

This nature photography workshop on Assateague Island is designed for those with a basic knowledge of the operation of a 35 mm SLR digital camera an interest in nature photography and who desire to improve their photographic skills and optimize the use of their camera. Program includes field sessions on Assateague Island, instructive slide programs, and critiques of participant images. Topics discussed include 1) equipment selection and operation, 2) composition, creativity and perspective, 3) metering and exposure, 4) lighting, 5) digital media and image storage, 6) basic image manipulation and 7) locating, approaching and photographing wildlife.

During the Friday evening orientation, departure times, current field conditions, potential subjects, equipment needed, safety, field ethics, and other logistical topics will be discussed. Prior to dawn on Saturday, the class participants will depart for the beach to photograph sunrise and take advantage of the soft, warm early morning light. Potential subjects include the sunrise, sand dunes, shells, the surf, beach vegetation, fisherman, the wild horses of Assateague Island, and local wildlife including whitetail deer, fox, raccoons, herons, rails, geese, ducks, shorebirds and other resident and migratory species. Mid-day will be set aside for editing images, followed by a critique of photos taken during the morning. The remainder of the afternoon will be devoted to more photography of island inhabitants, the beach and sunset. Sunday, photography will begin at dawn and continue through the morning. Mid-day editing will be followed by a final critique of images.
12 max # of participants.

Charleston with Margo Taussig Pinkerton

Charleston has many faces. Not only is she a southern belle, complete with handsome architecture, famous charm, beautiful tree-shaded streets and squares, wonderful wrought iron, old cemeteries, and an interesting waterfront, but nearby, there are historic plantations, the ocean and estuaries, and and we must not forget the wonderful, magnificent swamps with their graceful cypress trees, knees rising out of the water, and reflections amongst spring flowers. There is much to explore and inspire your artistic eye …

Landscapes may be found in the wilderness as well as in urban environments.

With workshops limited to 12 participants (a maximum 6:1 ratio, students to instructors), you can be assured of nearly as much one-one time as you want/need. We also welcome those whom we affectionately call our “Spousal Units,” those spouses and SOs who return so often to our workshops.

More details. Discount to NANPA Members.

Using Your Vehicle as a Photography Blind

Female Great Horned owl returning to her nest to continue incubation of her eggs. © Robert Strickland

Story and photographs by Robert Strickland

 

As you age, your ability to walk around is limited, so I have started using my vehicle as photography blind. Occasionally I get out of the car, use the tripod, and hike to a hot spot, but generally, I’m shooting photos from the car especially if I’m on a driving trail such as a loop road.

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NANPA Weekly Wow

Mother leopard and cub tender moment , Botswana. © Adolfo Rapaport

 

Each week www.nanpa.org highlights 7 images from the top 100 submissions of the 2018 NANPA Showcase competition. This week’s images are by:

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From the Executive Director- Susan Day

Susan Day- NANPA Executive Director

 

Hello! As 2017 comes to an end, I have been reflecting on all that happened in NANPA over the last 12 months. As I jotted down highlights, it occurred to me that you also might like to see an overview of NANPA’s past year.

2017 Snapshot of NANPA by the Numbers

1 – 2017 Nature Photography Summit in Jacksonville, FL —attended by nearly 650 members, speakers, and vendors.

5 – Regional Events – Adirondacks, NY; Bosque del Apache, NM; Chincoteague, VA: Southern Illinois; and Yellowstone, MT for spring wildlife.   Total of 100 attendees and 11 leaders.

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Kika Tuff – Young Photographer Profile

Photographs by Kika Tuff

Interview by David C. Lester

 

Kika Tuff in the field with her young daughter. © Kika Tuff

“It’s the music that does it for me,” laughs Kika Tuff, a professional photographer and filmmaker who first connected with NANPA during the 2015 college scholars program.  “Photos can be an incredibly powerful storytelling tool, but there is something about combining imagery and music that really makes films life-changing.

Before the NANPA college scholars program, Kika had considered  photography a hobby, her favorite hobby, and science was going to be her career.  After the program, however, everything about her career goals shifted.  The college scholars program allowed Kika to meet young people with similar interests, to learn about film and photography as conservation tools, and to engage with photographers dedicating their lives and careers to storytelling.  She says the experience totally changed her life.

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“Bosque Wildlife” at Bosque del Apache NWR with Sandy Zelasko and Irene Hinke-Sacilotto

Situated along the Rio Grande River, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge covers more than 57,000 acres and is a major wintering ground for cranes and waterfowl. Refuge personnel manage the water levels of its wetlands and impoundments to simulate what was once the seasonal flow of water from the Rio Grande before the river was damned and the flow altered. To feed the huge number of birds visiting the refuge each year, nearby fields are planted with corn, winter wheat, millet, and other grains. Loop roads transect the refuge marshes and fields and provide prime sites for wildlife viewing and photography. Species that may be seen include shovelers, buffleheads, pintails, teal and other ducks; bald and golden eagles; kestrels and other hawks; turkey; meadowlarks; quail; roadrunners; coyotes; mule deer; and more. In November, large flocks of snow geese and sandhill cranes will be present. At night to escape predators, the birds flock to the marshes and shallow pools. With dawn, the snow geese and other waterfowl rise in mass from the wetlands and sweep overhead on their way to nearby fields to feed. Each day we will spend the early morning and late afternoon hours at the refuge photographing birds and many other species of wildlife which are present at the sanctuary.

Volunteer Profile – jon holloway

jon holloway is a professional photographer who concentrates on nature and wildlife subjects, along with other types of work.  jon has been a photographer for over twenty years, and has been a member of the Art Department faculty at Lander University in Greenwood, South Carolina for the last seven years.  jon serves on the NANPA Board of Directors, and has been involved with the organization since its earliest days.  He believes in the power of the image to inspire thought and promote awareness of global issues pertaining to us all.  His work has been nationally and internationally exhibited, and collected by private and corporate clients, museums, and galleries.

 

After earning an undergraduate degree in Biology, jon worked on a ranch in Montana, and got to know California photographer William Neill during one of Neill’s workshops.  During the summer of 1993, jon biked across America, and that’s when he really fell in love with nature photography.  Afterward, he decided to pursue a photography degree at the Savannah College of Art & Design (SCAD) at the main Savannah, Georgia campus.  jon points out that this was a great experience, and was “a great time for me to really explore photography.”

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