The Navajo Nation: A Photography Guide

The famed Mittens, calling card of Monument Valley Tribal Park, Utah and Arizona. © Jerry Ginsberg
The Famed Mittens, Calling Card of Monument Valley Tribal Park © Jerry Ginsberg

Story and photos by Jerry Ginsberg

These days, whenever I think of the innumerable terrific photo destinations throughout our county, especially the great Southwest, my reaction has become, “Wait until next year.” With travel planning now stuck in limbo waiting out the coronavirus, it doesn’t hurt to catalog some of the places that await us when we are once again free to roam around in search of great places and great images. High on that list are the lands of the Diné Bikéyah or Navajo Nation.

At over 27,000 square miles in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, this sprawling tract is home to about 180,000 Native Americans. Tragically, they have been hit very hard by the coronavirus. As a result, the reservation has been locked down and prohibiting visitors for some time with an end not yet in sight.

Looking forward to brighter days, let’s take stock of some of the region’s visual highlights.

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Nightline: Overwhelmed by “Insta-crowds”

NANPA member and regular blog contributor Jerry Ginsberg was a a consultant to and interviewed on ABC’s Nightline program last night (July 29th) in a feature that examined the balance between access and protection at precious natural places, like the Wave, Zion, Horseshoe Bend and other unique, but fragile, locations.
NANPA member and regular blog contributor Jerry Ginsberg was a a consultant to and interviewed on ABC’s Nightline program last night (July 29th) in a feature that examined the balance between access and protection at precious natural places, like the Wave, Zion, Horseshoe Bend and other unique, but fragile, locations.

Story by Jerry Ginsberg

As some confirmed night owls and insomniacs reading this may have noticed, I recently appeared on ABC TV’s Nightline.

Aside from simply showcasing my good looks (Ha!!), the story made a serious and thoughtful point.

Social media, and especially Instagram, have contributed very significantly to over-crowding in our National Parks and other federal lands originally set aside for their ability to help us re-connect with Nature.

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