Iceland with Betty Sederquist

On this winter trip we’ll be exploring the south side of this photogenic island in a large van. I’m partnering with Strabo Tours to seek the best winter light. Iceland in winter is cold, yes, but not as cold as you’d think, with the Gulf Stream keeping coastal temperatures around freezing. Expect beautiful beached icebergs, lots of waterfalls, and with luck, the aurora borealis and ice caves. We’ll be based at an Icelandic horse ranch for a couple of days to marvel at these photogenic creatures and also detour to the Blue Lagoon for a soak in the hot waters. The people of Iceland are kind, friendly folks and that will be a highlight of the trip. We stay in comfortable, warm hotels and you will eat well. Prior to the trip we’ll go over gear needs carefully.

NATIONAL PARKS: Petrified Forest National Park Story and photographs by Jerry Ginsberg

Rainbow near sunset over the Painted Desert in Petrified Forest National Park, AZ.

Rainbow near sunset over the Painted Desert in Petrified Forest National Park, AZ. © Jerry Ginsberg

After searching for new and fresh images on federal lands for more than two decades, I can say that there seems to be two types of national parks: those that are heavily visited and those that are too often overlooked in favor of the big names, such as Yosemite and Yellowstone.

One of the less well-known precious gems is Petrified Forest National Park on the eastern edge of Arizona. Weighing in at about 300 square miles, one can easily drive the single road in this compact national treasure from end-to-end in less than half a day. Ah, but then you would be missing all the fun!

President Theodore Roosevelt invoked the Antiquities Act to create Petrified Forest National Monument in 1906 to protect enormous fossilized trees that have actually been turned into brilliant multicolored stone by some 220 million years of water, heat and pressure. The Petrified Forest became a national park in 1962. The park is a treasure trove of the fossilized bones and remains of dinosaurs and other Triassic creatures—such as the recently discovered skull of a phytosaur named Gumby. A trip here can be a fascinating experience for anyone. Continue reading

Montana’s HWY 1, The Pintler Scenic Byway by Pam W. Barbour

Flint Creek by Pam Barbour

Flint Creek by Pam Barbour

Text and Images by Pam W. Barbour

While looking at a map of Montana, if you draw a diagonal line between Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks, the center of that line nears a special place called the Pintler Scenic Byway (recently renamed the Pintler Veterans Memorial Scenic Byway). This byway is about 60 miles long and unlike many byways in Montana, it’s completely paved for its entire length. This scenic spur gives you a break from interstate driving but at the same time doesn’t deviate too far so you can get back on track if you’re headed somewhere specific. Also known as MT HWY 1, it was the first state highway to be paved. Going east on I-90 from Missoula, you can start at the north end of the byway in the town of Drummond. Going west on I-90 from Butte, you can start at the south end near the town of Anaconda. We’ll start in Drummond. Continue reading