Viral Images and Photographer Licensing

Story by Sean Fitzgerald, NANPA Past President

A  Manatee Image Goes Viral

An interesting article in PetaPixel raises a whole host of troublesome issues for the modern photographer. https://petapixel.com/2017/09/13/shot-hurricane-irma-photo-went-viral-wasnt-paid-dime/ Michael Sechler, a self-professed “photography enthusiast”, shot a very fine image of a manatee beached out of the water by the tidal surge from Hurricane Irma.

He posted it to Facebook, the image went viral, and then the real fun started. Fox News called. The Associated Press called. Everyone wanted to use the image in news stories, but they all wanted it for free.

Color me shocked. Continue reading

Must Attend Event of 2017

2017summitad_regopen

From the President

sfitzgerald_headshot_costaricaMy, how time flies. I am coming to the end of my term as president of NANPA and it feels like I just started. It is thrilling to see how NANPA has evolved to adapt and thrive. Where many similar organizations are shrinking or dying, NANPA stands tall, and we are well-positioned for the future.

Do we still have challenges? Oh yes! We must reach new audiences and attract new members, including younger ones. We need to provide our diverse membership more relevant benefits. And we have to continue to adapt to today’s challenges while staying true to NANPA’s values. Continue reading

The “Old School” Graduated ND Filter

It is easy for digital photographers to get lazy out in the field — “Oh, I can fix it digitally, later. . . .”

There is nothing necessarily wrong with that approach, but I like to try to get it right in the field, preferably all in one shot. And sometimes that takes a few tricks.

Take the image below I just photographed.

A long exposure can give a nice abstract feel to an image. Using a polarizer slows down your shutter speed about 2 stops helps give you that longer exposure. Combined with a small aperture and low ISO, I had a nice long 30 second exposure to really abstract the water on the lake.

But what about the sky?  It is a lot brighter than the darker foreground here and will overexpose.  I could shoot it in two different exposures and add in the properly exposed sky later, but I’d rather get it one shot.

So I pulled my 3 stop Graduated Neutral Density filter out of my bag and held it over the lens to bring down the light in the bright sky and equalize the exposure.  Voila – you get the image all in one shot. A little more work up front, sure, but worth it to me. (And less work on the computer, later!).

Sean Fitzgerald

Dock at Sunset on Bitter Lake