Danube Delta Scouting Tour with Jeff Parker

Because this is a SCOUTING TRIP this photo tour is offered at a very special low price: $2500 (all-inclusive; double occupancy – single is available).

Group size is limited to six (6)

During this Danube Delta photo tour, we’ll explore this biosphere reserve with cameras in-hand. This protected river network, famous with birders the world over, is Earth’s northernmost sub-tropical forest.

With over 5,500 species of flora and fauna, the Danube Delta is one of the world’s most bio-diverse places and hosts plenty of lens-fodder!

We already know birding here is awesome so we’ve organized this scouting trip to determine just how great the photography can be. As with our other scouting trips, this photo tour is offered only this once at this special price.

Mid-May is the to visit the Danube Delta. While the bird activity is at its peak, the temperatures are still relatively low compared to what they’ll be in the summer.

The Danube Delta is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and World Biosphere Reserve, encompassing about 1.6 million acres of rivers, canals, marshes, tree-fringed lakes, floating reed islands, and sand dunes. The waters of the Delta meander to the Black Sea.

What Winning NANPA Foundation’s Philip Hyde Grant Means

 

Cullinan Ranch levee breach - The 1500 acre Cullinan Ranch was purchased by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as part of San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge in 1991. It was diked off from tidal action and drained in the 1800’s to grow oat hay. It is now being restored for endangered species and other wildlife.

Cullinan Ranch levee breach – The 1500 acre Cullinan Ranch was purchased by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as part of San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge in 1991. It was diked off from tidal action and drained in the 1800’s to grow oat hay. It is now being restored for endangered species and other wildlife.

Story and photographs by Beth Huning, 2011 Philip Hyde Grant Recipient

As photographers, many of us are good at telling our conservation stories through imagery.  We use our photos to support projects that protect or restore the earth, its ecosystems, and inhabitants. Philip Hyde was a pioneer in using photographs for conservation and I have long admired his achievements. A native Californian, he was passionate about protecting the American West, and his photographs were influential in many conservation campaigns.

From the Editor: Applications for the 2018 Philip Hyde Grant and the 2018 Janie Moore Greene Grant are encouraged and will be accepted through midnight, October 31st. Details are at the end of the article.

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