India Holi and Tigers with Art Wolfe

This photography tour combines two wonderful aspects of India, the kaleidoscope of color that is the Holi festival and the magnificent and powerful tiger! The Holi Festival is a fantastic celebration that marks the arrival of spring and signifies the victory of good over evil. Riotous, vibrant color envelops India as revelers throw powdered dye with abandon, spraying water, and flooding the streets for raucous fun. Holi may be traditionally Hindu, but everyone is equal during this holiday.

Following the Holi Festival we will travel to Bandhavgarh National Park where a highlight will be the chance to photograph elusive tigers and leopards. In addition to the Bengal tiger, the park has a rich diversity of fauna and flora, including leopard, striped hyena, macaques, langur monkeys, sambar and chital deer, Indian wolves, Indian hare, monitor lizards and a great diversity avifauna.

Bicycle Birding

A reddish egret dances across the water while pursuing a fish.

A reddish egret dances across the water while pursuing a fish.

Story and Photos by Budd Titlow

If you are a bird photography aficionado, I have some great news!

The proliferation of “Rails-to-Trails” conversion projects throughout our nation has created a fantastic new modus operandi for practicing your passion. Plus, it also benefits your health by providing daily exercise. I call this activity bicycle birding and here’s how it works for me.

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Winter in Yellowstone with Daniel J. Cox

2019 Winter in Yellowstone Photography Tour – Photograph the “Winter Wonderland” of Yellowstone National Park in the comforts of a private luxury snow coach with wildlife photographer Daniel J. Cox.

Along the snowy trails, we’ll stop to photograph the beautiful landscapes and mountain vistas surrounded by steamy geysers, along with a variety of wildlife, including the majestic elk, mammoth bison, coyotes, swans, and bald eagles. These creatures, big and small, find warmth near many of the thermal areas, creating unique and stunning imagery. We’ve had some years with great wolf viewing and hope to have similar opportunities again in 2019.

NANPA Member in the News: Cindy Miller Hopkins and Five Penguins

The Pew Bertarelli Ocean Legacy Project interviews NANPA member Cindy Miller Hopkins.

The Pew Bertarelli Ocean Legacy Project interviews NANPA member Cindy Miller Hopkins.

What’s so special about a photo of five penguins?  You could get that at a local zoo.  Certainly, during NANPA member and travel and photographer Cindy Miller Hopkin’s trip last year to the far reaches of the South Atlantic, she had plenty of photos of penguins.  But one shot, from off the South Sandwich Islands, turned out to be unique.

As she was editing and captioning her shots, Cindy noticed that there were five different species of penguins in one frame.  That seemed unusual and she brought it to the attention of an ornithologist on the tour who told her he’d never seen an image with five species in the same place, at the same time.  Further research revealed that no one else had either.

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How I Got The Shot: Ezo Red Fox in Hokkaido

Ezo red fox on patrol, Eastern Hokkaido, Japan.

Ezo red fox on patrol, eastern Hokkaido, Japan.

Story and photos by Alyce Bender

Early morning, when the roads were still frosted over and there were more deer than people awake, I rolled out my warm hotel on the eastern coast of Hokkaido to visit a place I had never been. This is par for the course with me, but this was a bit of a different situation as I was heading for a relatively unheard of location that a new friend told me about. She had promised there would be Steller’s sea eagles and White-tailed eagles feeding on the leftover fish guts that ice fishermen discard on a frozen lake. Too good a potential photography opportunity for me to pass up, so I made the hour-long drive along the coast on a cold, wintery morning. It could not have been a better choice!

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Volunteer Profile: John E. Marriott

Photographer John E. Marriott in the rainforest.

Photographer John E. Marriott in the rainforest.

Volunteers are the life blood of membership organizations.  At NANPA and the NANPA Foundation, volunteers serve on committees, help plan conferences, present webinars, judge competitions and evaluate grant applications.  Volunteers serve on the Board of Directors and play other key roles in keeping NANPA vibrant, relevant and growing.

This is the second of an occasional series of volunteer profiles, saluting those whose hard work, ideas, passion and commitment benefit NANPA and its members.

NANPA recently had the opportunity to ask NANPA volunteer John E. Marriott a few questions about his volunteer experiences.

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NANPA 2019 Outstanding Photographer of the Year: Florian Schulz

Outstanding Photographer of the Year Florian Schulz.

Outstanding Photographer of the Year Florian Schulz.

The Outstanding Photographer of the Year Award goes to an individual who has demonstrated unquestioned skill and excellence as a nature photographer through his or her past work and who has produced extraordinary recent work of significance to the industry.  That would be a pretty good description of the career of Florian Schulz, the 2019 Outstanding Photographer of the Year.

Schulz is a photographer, filmmaker, speaker and teacher, specializing in wildlife and conservation photojournalism. He is a Senior Founding Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers and serves on the iLCS board. He’s been published in publications like National Geographic magazine and is an in-demand speaker.

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Kenya Photography Tour with Daniel J. Cox

1 FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED – LAST SPACE!

Our 14th KENYA PHOTOGRAPHY EXPEDITION is among the best locations to photograph wildlife in the world. If you’ve never visited this magical country, be prepared for incredible wildlife and cultural experiences. From the monkeys trying to get into your tent to the lion prides of the Mara, YOU WILL ENJOY! The photography opportunities are endless and your stories will be shared for many years to come.

We’ll fly between lodges, and this year we’ve also added two extra nights on safari (2 nights in Nairobi and 12 nights at the lodges) along with a private encounter at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust elephant orphanage. Only 3-4 guests max per safari vehicle! Kenya will not get better than it is now—join us!

A Turning Point in My Photography: NANPA’s High School Scholarship Program

Owl on alert in the forest.

Owl on alert in the forest.

Story and photos by Ashleigh Scully

I was a participant in the 2017 NANPA High School Scholarship Program and spent a week in the Great Smoky Mountains working with some incredible mentors, broadening my interests in photography and learning from some very talented kids my age as well.

This program was a turning point for me–it showed me just how much I want to inspire the younger generation to learn more about conservation and photography. Working with and learning from 9 other students from across the country was not what I expected it to be. I had assumed we would all stick to the certain aspects of photography we were comfortable with, but instead we all motivated each other to try a little bit of everything.

During that week in the Smokies, I got to experiment with flash and night photography and use some of the cameras, lenses, and flashes that Canon sent to as loaners. I now have knowledge of the settings to use for star and night photography, something that will definitely come in handy for me in the future. We also hiked out to a waterfall and attempted slow motion waterfall photos to capture the blur of the water. Using the loaner flashes, we also found little salamanders and toads and used white backgrounds for the “Meet Your Neighbors” technique that  Andrew Snyder, one of the mentors, taught us. Some of the kids were so in love with this new technique, it was all they did!

Do you know a talented young nature photographer? NANPA’s High School Scholarship Program is seeking 10 high school student photographers to attend a five-day field event where they can learn from the industry’s top shooters. Apply now for this immersive, hands-on education program to be held in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park July 1–6, 2019. Combining classroom and field-based instruction, students will have the chance to improve their nature photography skills, learn about NANPA, meet industry professionals, and gain an appreciation of the Smoky Mountains’ rich natural history. The last day to apply is January 31, 2019, so don’t wait. Apply now!

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How I Got The Shot: The Captive

White-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys) seen through bars, dangles from the door frame of his enclosure

White-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys) seen through bars, dangles from the door frame of his enclosure evoking a sense of frustration, boredom, loneliness at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Story & photo by Haley R. Pope

Most of what makes a wildlife photograph great is the photographer’s ability to get inside the head of the animal and show the world through their eyes. What are they thinking? How do they see their environment? How do they see us? What is their story? In other words, a photographer needs to create an emotional connection to the subject or elicit an emotional response in the viewer. Emotion creates a layer of dimensionality that help us suspend judgments and see honestly.

The rest of what makes a great photograph is the photographer’s ability to correctly, and technically, control the camera so as to represent the scene as one saw and felt it. How am I going to tell the story? What landscape elements should I include? Do I need a shallow or wide depth of field? Should I over or underexpose the shot? How fast should I set my shutter speed? Do I have enough lighting? Where should I physically be positioned? These questions should be in your mind as you think about how to communicate your message and how to set yourself up to create your photo.

The two questions I ask myself before and during every photo shoot is: 1) what story do I want to tell and 2) how am I going to craft my image so the story is clear to viewers?

A Day at the Zoo

I have never been a fan of zoos, but on a warm day in June I decided to go. After I arrived, it wasn’t difficult to decide what story to tell. I wanted to tell the story of what it’s like to be locked up against one’s will. I wanted us to put ourselves in the animal’s shoes, so to speak, so I needed the emotional connection to be strong and our similarities to be obvious. I wanted us to consider what role we should play in other animals’ lives and whether or not there is even a need for animal exhibits like zoos.

As I passed through each exhibit and looked at the faces and body language of the animals inside, I was overcome with emotions of loneliness, sadness, boredom, and frustration; emotions I felt emanating from the animals themselves. Emerging from the kangaroo exhibit, I crossed the paved walkway and entered the primate center. No animal that day seemed to express the story so noticeably or poignantly than the white-cheeked gibbon. I knew this is where I would find my shot.

I watched the male gibbon for several minutes without picking up my camera and took note of his environment and behavior. I noticed whether the gibbon made eye contact with me and how he moved around the space. Then I circled the enclosure while thinking about how I’d like to compose the shot. What elements will help drive home my message and how I should represent the being inside?

I decided to include the metal bars of the enclosure as a frame for my subject since that’s exactly what they are. I also wanted to include both man-made and natural elements to provide context and juxtaposition. Focusing on the gibbon’s body language would illustrate both how similar our bodies are and how misplaced his own seems in contrast to the surrounding concrete and metal.

At one point, the gibbon stood up from where he sat and walked towards the interior door. With his back to me, he dangled from the door by its hinges and swayed back in forth in the characteristic way of under-stimulated animals. This was it. I raised my camera and snapped the shot. But I felt guilty as I turned and left him, embarrassed that I could just walk away while he stayed there, hanging and swaying.

Nature photographers don’t typically strive to capture disturbing situations. We want to show how beautiful the natural world is, in its raw form, and how we are all connected. But that is only half the story. If we never represent the other side of reality, we can become passive and complacent. I wanted to capture the other side of reality during my zoo visit. Because all animals are part of nature and zoos are not filled with happy carefree animals. They are filled with captives.

 

See the full gallery here: https://www.terralensphotography.com/zoos-for-none.

 

About Haley Pope:

Haley R. Pope is a zoologist and conservationist with a passion for photography and writing. She uses those mediums to explore wildlife conservation topics and share biological knowledge in a visual story-like format to inspire awe of our planet’s inherent beauty and encourage the responsible treatment of nature. As the president and owner of TerraLens Photography LLC, she offers freelance photography, writing, and photo archiving services to other companies.

Haley is also a trip leader for Habitat for Humanity’s Global Village program, which operates in more than 40 countries and builds houses for those in need. In the future, she’d like to lead ecological and photography focused trips. Connect with her below!

 

Connect with Haley:

Website: www.TerraLensPhotography.com

Instagram: @TerraLensPhotography

Facebook: @TerraLensPhotography

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/HaleyRPope/

Travel: www.HabitatsForGlobalVillage@wordpress.com