Winter in Yellowstone with Juan Pons

“The Serengeti of North America”
Yellowstone has been called the Serengeti of North America and with good reason; it contains the largest concentration of free-roaming wildlife in the lower 48 states. The numbers are staggering, sixty-seven different mammals live here, including grizzly bears, black bears, gray wolves, wolverine, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, pronghorn, linx, elk, bison, moose, coyotes, foxes as well as other numerous small mammals.

Any description of Yellowstone will be filled with superlatives; First National Park in the world, greatest concentration of thermal features in the word, up until recently the largest National Park in the lower 48 states, home to the largest Bison herd in the world, and of course, it is home to, perhaps, the most famous geyser in the world, Old Faithful.

What sets my Yellowstone photo workshops apart
First know that I have been leading winter photo workshops in Yellowstone for 16 years, every year. In Yellowstone it is imperative that you have a guide that knows the park very well. Yellowstone is vast, and you need to know the trends in the animal behaviors to know where to find them and how to photograph them in the bets possible way.

I believe that in order to truly enjoy your time and get the most out of a photography tour and/or workshop you need to have small groups, and a very high ratio of instructors to participants. My Yellowstone workshops are very unique in that the group is very small, no more than 6 participants with 2 instructors, that is a 3:1 ratio! The reason our Yellowstone groups are so small is very simple, I want EVERY participant to have their own door and window out of the vehicles. This provides participants with the best opportunities to capture those images when speed is of the essence in exiting the vehicles and setting up or when it is necessary to shoot out of the window. Additionally I want to make sure you have plenty of room for your gear and warm clothing.

Compare that most other tours were you have one instructor and up to 14 participants in a single van, with no operable windows! With me you are assured to have the best vantage point at all times, and never be held back by sitting in an overcrowded van.

As a photo workshop leader I take my responsibilities seriously. I work closely with the National Parks and I always operate with all the proper insurance, permits and certifications. I am an Authorized Permittee of the Yellowstone National Park.

What you will learn
You will be accompanied by Juan, an accomplished professional photographer, and photographic educator who has a deep passion for the outdoors. I believe that the best way to teach is by demonstrating, and to this end, I will be shooting alongside you, demonstrating my vision, technique and sharing my love and knowledge of Yellowstone. However, my priority is always YOU, and helping you get the best images YOU can get. Additionally, I freely share my equipment with you in order to give you some “in-the-field” experience with some of the equipment you may have been thinking of acquiring.

The biggest advantage of having small groups is the flexibility they provide for customizing and adjusting both the schedule and agenda to suit the interests of the group while being able to maintain the flexibility required by variable weather. This allows us to cover only those topics that you are all interested in, including:

• How to create asthetically pleasing wildlife and landscape photographs
• Storytelling thru natural history photography
• Best use of equipment
• Digital Workflow
• Adobe Lightroom basics
• Image presentations and critiques

What to expect
My workshops are pretty intense, and as such you should not expect this to be a leisurely vacation. My goal is to capture the best images we can during our tour. What this means is that our days are long, typically starting before dawn and ending after sunset. However, we typically will take a long lunch to rest and recouperate.

Within 2 working days of registering for the workshop you will receive a confirmation email with a request for your deposit. Once I receive your deposit, I will email you a registration confirmation as well as the details you will need to book your airfare. I will then be emailing you periodically with any pertinent information about the workshop, including checklists for clothing and gear to bring.

About 6 to 8 weeks prior to the workshop, you then start hearing from us on a more regular basis. At that point I will provide you with detailed lodging and contact information, go over more details of the workshop and get you excited and thinking about the images you want to capture during the workshop. At this time you will also receive from us a list of recommended clothing, equipment and even discounts for equipment you may want to acquire for this once on a lifetime trip.

However, I am always available to answer any questions you may have leading up to the workshop.

What is Included
• All Lodging
• All Meals
• Ground transportation including private Snowcoach
• Snacks and water in the vehicles at all times
• All permits & fees
• Instruction
• Inspiration
• Camaraderie
• A great time

Lofoten Islands Arctic Winter with Juan Pons

In our Lofoten Islands Arctic Winter Photo Tour, we spend a week photographing the best landscape the islands have to offer. Norway’s Lofoten Islands are a near dreamlike landscape of rugged mountain peaks rising directly from the deep blue sea. Located 200 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle, Lofoten is a true land of the midnight sun, where it will circle the summer sky without setting – or not rise at all during the dark months of winter. With the northern lights dancing over the islands from September to April and the temperate currents of the gulf stream softening the deep freeze of the Arctic, Lofoten has become a coveted winter photography destination in recent years. And beyond the landscape, the coast of Lofoten is lined with scenic fishing villages and their traditional Rorbu cabins, often perilously situated on the rocky shoreline.

We will split our base camps between Sakrisøy in the Reine area, with glacial carved granite peaks just outside the door and Hattvika Lodge in Ballstad, Lofoten’s largest working fishing village to this day. In both locations, we stay in traditional Rorbuer cabins, used by Lofoten’s fishermen for generations. From each location, we are only a stone’s throw away from innumerable photo opportunities, and at times, we may simply choose to go and explore by foot. Should the weather cooperate with clear skies, then we’ll have many locations in reach for photographing the dance of the northern lights as they fill the sky over snowy mountain peaks and wild beaches.

Winter in Yellowstone with Juan Pons

“The Serengeti of North America”
Yellowstone has been called the Serengeti of North America and with good reason; it contains the largest concentration of free-roaming wildlife in the lower 48 states. The numbers are staggering, sixty-seven different mammals live here, including grizzly bears, black bears, gray wolves, wolverine, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, pronghorn, linx, elk, bison, moose, coyotes, foxes as well as other numerous small mammals.

Any description of Yellowstone will be filled with superlatives; First National Park in the world, greatest concentration of thermal features in the word, up until recently the largest National Park in the lower 48 states, home to the largest Bison herd in the world, and of course, it is home to, perhaps, the most famous geyser in the world, Old Faithful.

What sets my Yellowstone photo workshops apart
First know that I have been leading winter photo workshops in Yellowstone for 16 years, every year. In Yellowstone it is imperative that you have a guide that knows the park very well. Yellowstone is vast, and you need to know the trends in the animal behaviors to know where to find them and how to photograph them in the bets possible way.

I believe that in order to truly enjoy your time and get the most out of a photography tour and/or workshop you need to have small groups, and a very high ratio of instructors to participants. My Yellowstone workshops are very unique in that the group is very small, no more than 6 participants with 2 instructors, that is a 3:1 ratio! The reason our Yellowstone groups are so small is very simple, I want EVERY participant to have their own door and window out of the vehicles. This provides participants with the best opportunities to capture those images when speed is of the essence in exiting the vehicles and setting up or when it is necessary to shoot out of the window. Additionally I want to make sure you have plenty of room for your gear and warm clothing.

Compare that most other tours were you have one instructor and up to 14 participants in a single van, with no operable windows! With me you are assured to have the best vantage point at all times, and never be held back by sitting in an overcrowded van.

As a photo workshop leader I take my responsibilities seriously. I work closely with the National Parks and I always operate with all the proper insurance, permits and certifications. I am an Authorized Permittee of the Yellowstone National Park.

What you will learn
You will be accompanied by Juan, an accomplished professional photographer, and photographic educator who has a deep passion for the outdoors. I believe that the best way to teach is by demonstrating, and to this end, I will be shooting alongside you, demonstrating my vision, technique and sharing my love and knowledge of Yellowstone. However, my priority is always YOU, and helping you get the best images YOU can get. Additionally, I freely share my equipment with you in order to give you some “in-the-field” experience with some of the equipment you may have been thinking of acquiring.

The biggest advantage of having small groups is the flexibility they provide for customizing and adjusting both the schedule and agenda to suit the interests of the group while being able to maintain the flexibility required by variable weather. This allows us to cover only those topics that you are all interested in, including:

• How to create asthetically pleasing wildlife and landscape photographs
• Storytelling thru natural history photography
• Best use of equipment
• Digital Workflow
• Adobe Lightroom basics
• Image presentations and critiques

What to expect
My workshops are pretty intense, and as such you should not expect this to be a leisurely vacation. My goal is to capture the best images we can during our tour. What this means is that our days are long, typically starting before dawn and ending after sunset. However, we typically will take a long lunch to rest and recouperate.

Within 2 working days of registering for the workshop you will receive a confirmation email with a request for your deposit. Once I receive your deposit, I will email you a registration confirmation as well as the details you will need to book your airfare. I will then be emailing you periodically with any pertinent information about the workshop, including checklists for clothing and gear to bring.

About 6 to 8 weeks prior to the workshop, you then start hearing from us on a more regular basis. At that point I will provide you with detailed lodging and contact information, go over more details of the workshop and get you excited and thinking about the images you want to capture during the workshop. At this time you will also receive from us a list of recommended clothing, equipment and even discounts for equipment you may want to acquire for this once on a lifetime trip.

However, I am always available to answer any questions you may have leading up to the workshop.

What is Included
• All Lodging
• All Meals
• Ground transportation including private Snowcoach
• Snacks and water in the vehicles at all times
• All permits & fees
• Instruction
• Inspiration
• Camaraderie
• A great time

Winter in Yellowstone with Daniel J. Cox

2019 Winter in Yellowstone Photography Tour – Photograph the “Winter Wonderland” of Yellowstone National Park in the comforts of a private luxury snow coach with wildlife photographer Daniel J. Cox.

Along the snowy trails, we’ll stop to photograph the beautiful landscapes and mountain vistas surrounded by steamy geysers, along with a variety of wildlife, including the majestic elk, mammoth bison, coyotes, swans, and bald eagles. These creatures, big and small, find warmth near many of the thermal areas, creating unique and stunning imagery. We’ve had some years with great wolf viewing and hope to have similar opportunities again in 2019.

NATIONAL PARKS: Yellowstone in Winter

Story by Jerry Ginsberg. Photography by Kevin Horsefield

Winter Wonderland

Winter Wonderland © Kevin Horsefield

Yellowstone, the world’s very first national park and one of the most popular, was established in 1872. Most of us think of it as a place to visit in spring, summer and fall, but certainly not in winter.

Wyoming winters can be brutally cold with great snow accumulations. The Yellowstone Plateau where the park sits averages 8,000 feet of elevation. This high elevation makes the sun more intense and the alpine weather patterns more dynamic and unpredictable.

Sound forbidding? Well, it can be. Indeed, the park was pretty much devoid of wintertime visitors until the advent of specialized cold-weather tourism several years ago. Since the cold is often intense and the snows deep, what’s the point, you might ask? Continue reading

A Tale of Two Winters by Kathy Lichtendahl

Mystic Falls © Kathy Lichtendahl

Mystic Falls © Kathy Lichtendahl

Although Yellowstone National Park is a photographer’s paradise any time of year, it is truly magical in the winter months. But a visit to the Park in the cold season requires a certain amount of research and planning. Many of the roads close down completely in late October and re-open to supervised over-snow travel in mid-December, remaining open until the end of February before closing once again for spring plowing. One exception is the road between Mammoth Hot Springs and Cooke City, Montana, through the well-known Lamar Valley. The road is Cooke City’s only automobile access to the outside world in winter and so it is kept open year round. Continue reading

FIELD TECHNIQUES: Show the Snow by F.M. Kearney

W-300 Story and photograph by F.M. Kearney

This winter has certainly been one for the record books. While most people probably long for the warm days of summer, I personally can never get enough of the cold and everything that comes with it.

There’s nothing better than photographing a freshly snow-covered landscape glistening in bright sunlight. For an added dynamic effect, I sometimes include the sun and position it partially behind a tree branch, to create an eye-catching starburst. Although stunning images like these “after the snow” photos are well-worth capturing, I recently began experimenting with taking pictures during the actual snowfall. Continue reading

IN THE FIELD: Christmas Presence

Story and Photographs by F.M. Kearneykearney-PN_21a

A light to moderate snow had fallen the night before, coating the ground with a few inches of powdery goodness. The snow muffled my footsteps as I forged a new trail in the New York Botanical Garden. As an Early Morning Pass holder, I was able to enter the garden several hours before its official opening to the general public—allowing me one of the first unspoiled looks at what nature had delivered overnight. Continue reading